Brotherhood of St Laurence

New Book List 2022

This list contains 167 titles

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Victorian community organisations' submission to the Australian Energy Regulator (AER) 'Regulating Gas Pipelines Under Uncertainty' Information Paper / BSL ; Renew

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Renew.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2022Description: 21 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This joint submission has been prepared by the Renew and Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL), with consultation with other community organisations. We represent residential, and particularly vulnerable, consumers. For households facing financial stress and other forms of disadvantage, ensuring that energy remains affordable while we transition to a zero-carbon economy is crucial. Regulators must ensure that the risks to households are mitigated while facilitating a transition away from fossil gas in line with Australia’s international commitments, including by coordinating with governments and rejecting proposals by energy businesses that increase risk. Although the AER has invited responses to the Information Paper as part of the current Victorian gas network access arrangements, this submission also comments on the general principles raised by the paper, relating to both the Victorian access arrangements and future processes. Given the paper’s indication of a preliminary view that accelerated depreciation ‘would be appropriate if there is sufficient evidence to demonstrate and quantify the pricing risk and stranded asset risk arising from demand uncertainty’, the main focus of this submission is on accelerated depreciation. Our views on the other potential options put forward in the paper are summarised in the Appendix. -- p. 1 ; Contents: Victorian community organisations’ submission to the Australian Energy Regulator (AER) ‘Regulating Gas Pipelines Under Uncertainty’ Information Paper 1 -- Summary 4 -- 1 NETWORK BUSINESSES DO NOT HAVE A REGULATORY ENTITLEMENT TO ACCELERATED DEPRECIATION (OR OTHER MEASURES) TO RESOLVE THE RISKS OF UNCERTAINTY 7 -- 1.1 The stranding risk facing the gas network businesses is not primarily caused by policy decisions 7 -- 1.2 The level of the regulated Rate of Return does not entitle networks to accelerated depreciation 7 -- 1.3 The Revenue and Pricing Principles do not guarantee a return of capital 8 -- 1.4 Consumers bear demand risk through take-or-pay tariff structures 9 -- 2 ACCELERATED DEPRECIATION DOES NOT MANAGE THE RISKS FOR CONSUMERS ASSOCIATED WITH ELECTRIFICATION, AND MAY INCREASE THEM 9 -- 2.1 An electrification scenario poses potential risks, as well as benefits, to residential energy consumers 9 -- 2.2 Accelerated depreciation does not address the risk of electrification for consumers 9 -- 2.2.1 Accelerated depreciation may accelerate disconnection from the gas network, so that early depreciation does not recover contribution from a larger customer base 10 -- 2.2.2 Measures to enable all customers to access electric appliances will be required 10 -- 2.2.3 Measures will be needed to establish a transition schedule for network assets, and to safeguard affordability as the gas network becomes underutilised 10 -- 2.2.4 Other measures will be needed to mitigate the potential impact of electrification on the electricity network 11 2.3 Accelerated depreciation may increase risks for consumers 11 -- 2.3.1 Accelerated depreciation will increase consumer gas tariffs 11 -- 2.3.2 An accelerated unplanned consumer exit from the gas network is more likely to be unmanaged 11 -- 2.3.3 Risk mitigation may make networks more likely to propose inefficient investment 11 -- 2.4 Where assets don’t become stranded, accelerated depreciation will risk the financial viability of network service providers 12 -- 2.5 A continual adjustment of depreciation time frames would be particularly high-risk for customers 12 -- 2.6 Voluntarily exit from the gas network must be better understood, and accounted for 13 -- 3 ADDRESSING UNCERTAINTY WILL REQUIRE CHANGES TO REGULATIONS AND COORDINATION WITH GOVERNMENT 13 -- 3.1 Government support will be needed to manage consumer risks in an electrification scenario, and especially if parts of the network are wound down 13 -- 3.2 The NGO should be revised to include decarbonisation as a core objective 14 -- 3.2.1 The AER should optimise investment to support efficient decarbonisation even without revision to the NGO and NEO (National Electricity Objectives) 14 -- 3.3 The NGL should facilitate optimal energy objectives, not consider gas in isolation 15 -- 3.4 The NGL should not encourage growth in gas connections or consumption 15 -- 4 RISK MITIGATION FOR NETWORK BUSINESSES SHOULD ONLY BE CONSIDERED WHERE CONSUMER RISKS ARE ALSO ADDRESSED 15 --- 4.1 Adequately addressing consumer risks may require negotiation with the networks 15 -- 4.2 The expected timeline for decarbonisation is not a reason to overlook consumer rights in a transition process 16 -- 4.3 Accelerated depreciation should not be considered where networks are being augmented, or new customers are being connected 16 -- 4.4 Accelerated depreciation should not be considered where revenue is being invested in future gas projects 17 --4.5 Accelerated depreciation should not be considered without a framework that establishes appropriate ownership of assets, management of early depreciation payments and Decommissioning at the end of the depreciation timeframe 18 -- 4.6 An adequate framework may also require asset revaluation 18 -- 5 Appendix – Other proposed measures 20 -- 6 References. 21Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Joint submission to the Australian Energy Regulator (AER) from Victorian community organisations re 2023-27 APA Victorian Gas Transmission System Access Arrangement / BSL ; Renew

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Renew.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2022Description: 23 p. PDF.Other title: 2022 Victorian gas access arrangements – joint submission from community organisations.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This joint submission has been prepared by Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL), and Renew, in consultation with other community organisations. We represent residential, and particularly vulnerable, consumers. For households facing financial stress and other forms of disadvantage, ensuring that energy remains affordable while we transition to a zero-carbon economy is crucial. Regulators must ensure that the risks to households are mitigated while facilitating a transition away from fossil gas in line with Australia’s international commitments. This submission represents our preliminary response to the issues presented by the draft proposals – with the possibility that our position may be refined as the process progresses. ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
NDIS workforce final report / Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

by Australia. Parliament. Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme [author,, issuing body.] | Andrews, Kevin James, 1955- [organiser.].

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme, 2022Description: xi, 134 p. PDF.Other title: National Disability Insurance Scheme, NDIS workforce final report.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is one of Australia’s most ambitious public policy initiatives. Critical to the sustainability of the NDIS, is a workforce of sufficient size to meet demand, and which has the appropriate skills, qualifications and expertise to deliver safe, quality supports to participants. It is estimated that the NDIS workforce will need to grow by an additional 83 000 full time equivalent staff to support participants at the scheme’s projected peak. However, attracting and retaining a suitably skilled, qualified workforce continues to prove a significant challenge, with the sector increasingly seen as overworked, underpaid, undervalued and poorly trained. On 9 December 2020, the committee tabled an interim report for this inquiry. Aware that the Australian Government was, at the time, developing a national workforce plan for the NDIS, the report examined the range of issues facing the NDIS workforce, made 14 recommendations on how such matters should be addressed and outlined what the content, scope and focus of the forthcoming NDIS workforce plan should be. The committee welcomed the release of the NDIS National Workforce Plan: 2021-2025 (Workforce Plan; the Plan) in June 2021, along with other measures identified by the Australian Government in response to the committee’s interim report. However, evidence provided to this inquiry has demonstrated that ambitious action is needed to adequately address issues within the NDIS workforce and to safeguard the availability of safe and quality supports for NDIS participants into the future. This second and final report for this inquiry makes eight recommendations to further address such matters. The recommendations relate to: increasing NDIS workforce data collection ; consulting NDIS workers and other key stakeholders in all NDIS pricing review processes ; improving employment opportunities for people with disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people within the workforce ; addressing the funding and resourcing implications of new training and upskilling initiatives ; increasing student placement opportunities within the workforce ; developing clear and measurable outcomes for the initiatives in the NDIS National Workforce Plan 2021-2025; and developing a comprehensive consultation strategy for the implementation of measures under the Workforce Plan. p -- ix Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Model Disability Survey (MDS) : survey manual / WHO ; World Bank

by World Health Organization | World Bank.

Publisher: Geneva, Switzerland : World Health Organization, 2017Description: 138 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The World Health Organization's Model Disability Survey (MDS) Manual is a tool to help implement the MDS in countries and to improve the quality of the interview process. This manual is intended to provide practical information about the survey instruments and their use during interviews. This manual is to be used as a training tool for interviewers when administering the questionnaire. The manual is intended for all parties responsible for implementing the Model Disability Survey and using the resulting data. The various parties include a wide range of people from interviewers, field staff, supervisors and principal investigator(s), laboratory and data entry technicians and statisticians, to public health officials in the Ministry of Health and/or any health institutions. [Introduction] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Orange Book 2022 : policy priorities for the federal government / Danielle Wood, Brendan Coates, Stephen Duckett (GI)

by Wood, Danielle | Grattan Institute | Coates, Brendan | Duckett, Stephen et al.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2022Description: 141 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Briefing Pack | Website (incl chart data) Summary: Elections are times for political parties to articulate their policy vision. And for the 2022 federal election, held in the third year of a global pandemic, a program of bold and well-designed policies is more important than ever. This report sets out the policies we think should be part of that program. [Overview]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Remote Indigenous housing requires ongoing policy focus : submission to the Review of the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement / Michael Dillon (Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research)

by Dillon, Michael | Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.

Canberra, ACT : Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (ANU) 2022Description: iv, 18 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This Topical Issues paper identifies remote Indigenous housing as a structural gap in the nation’s overarching housing policies. The paper reproduces a submission to the current Productivity Commission review of the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement (NHHA) which argues for a much stronger focus to be placed upon remote Indigenous housing in the renewal of the NHHA scheduled for 2023. The submission outlines the extent and systemic underpinnings of the substantial Indigenous housing shortfall in remote Australia and assesses the adequacy of current policy frameworks to meet that need and thus mitigate ongoing adverse social, health and economic consequences. In particular, the submission argues that the national housing target in the National Agreement on Closing the Gap is, in its current form, an inadequate mechanism to address remote housing need. The submission makes a number of specific recommendations designed to ensure that remote Indigenous housing needs are effectively addressed going forward. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Really proper dangerous one : Aboriginal responses to the first wave of COVID-19 in the Kimberley / Kathryn Thorburn ; Kate Golson ; Catherine Ridley et al. (Nulungu Research Institute)

by Thorburn, Kathryn | University of Notre Dame Australia. Nulungu Research Institute | Golson, Kate | Ridley, Catherine et al.

Publisher: Broome : Nulungu Research Institute, The University of Notre Dame Australia, 2022Description: 119 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report brings together both qualitative and quantitative data sources to describe how Aboriginal people and organisations responded to the threat of COVID-19 across the Kimberley in 2020, how the various government policies and approaches rolled out, and how they were received on the ground.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Behind the line : poverty and disadvantage in Australia 2022 / Alan Duncan (Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre)

by Duncan, Alan | Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre.

Publisher: Bentley WA : Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre, 2022Description: 76. p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report, the ninth in the Focus on the States series, provides the latest examination of the prevalence of poverty within Australia, how this has changed over time, and which groups in society face the greatest risks of financial hardship and material deprivation. The report looks at how income poverty has changed through the experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic and examines how Australia’s states and territories compare in the prevalence of poverty and disadvantage. and seek to understand more about people’s journeys into poverty, and the pathways and supports to escape from financial hardship. The measurement of income poverty in the report assesses the number of people whose incomes fall below a poverty line as a representation of a basic living standard. But much of this Focus on the States report looks ‘behind the line’, exploring deeper issues that highlight how poverty affects people’s livelihoods and life chances, and their sense of wellbeing. The report reveals the scarring effects of childhood poverty on life outcomes in adulthood, and shows the extent to which prolonged experiences of poverty affect mental health and exert psychological trauma. It also puts forward for consideration a range of policy recommendations that would go some way to alleviating and assisting people to escape the poverty trap. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Precarious housing and wellbeing : a multi-dimensional investigation / Rachel Ong ViforJ ; Ranjodh Singh ; Emma Baker et al. (AHURI)

by Ong ViforJ, Rachel | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Singh, Ranjodh | Baker, Emma et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2022Description: iv, 54 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This research examines how the bi-directional relationship between housing precariousness and wellbeing varies across population subgroups and over time; sheds light on the dimensions of housing precariousness that affect wellbeing, and vice versa; and considers how policy interventions to effectively minimise negative impacts of precarious housing on wellbeing. Wellbeing is a critical and internationally recognised yardstick of societal progress and policy impact, putting individuals at the centre of evaluation. Precarious housing includes household-based conditions such as forced moves and living in unaffordable housing or overcrowded housing, and area-based precarious housing conditions, such as living in an area of relative socio-economic disadvantage or in a higher crime area. Singles, households with no children, low-income households, private renters and residents of major cities have lower wellbeing when precariously housed compared to when they are not precariously housed. Young people are more likely to fall into or remain in precarious housing than older people. Among the 25–34-years age band, 19 per cent fall into precarious housing and 24 per cent stay in precarious housing from year to year. On the other hand, only 4 per cent of the 65+ years age group fall into precarious housing and just 12 per cent stay in precarious housing from year to year. Unaffordable housing—ranging from an average incidence of 6 per cent to 8 per cent over the study timeframe—is a more common form of housing precariousness than forced moves and overcrowding. The experience of physical violence is a key driver that precipitates a fall into precarious housing or extends a spell of precarious housing [Website].Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
WGEA Review Report : review of the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012, December 2021 / Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

by Australia. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : The Department, 2021; © Commonwealth of Australia 2021Description: 96 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: WGEA Review Report.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This report proposes ten recommendations to accelerate progress on gender equality in workplaces and streamline reporting for employers to the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA). The headline recommendations are: Recommendation 1: make it easier for employers to report to WGEA and improve WGEA’s data collection by enabling WGEA to use data employers have already provided to government and investing in a way to assist employers to extract other data from their own employer systems using a digital solution. It is proposed that a new Gender Data Steering Group led by senior officials will oversee research and stakeholder consultation to drive this work. Recommendation 2: publish organisation gender pay gaps at an employer level – not just at an industry level as currently happens – to accelerate action to close them. Recommendation 3: bridge the ‘action gap’ with new gender equality standards that set targets by requiring large employers (500 or more employees) to commit to, achieve, and report to WGEA on measurable genuine targets to improve gender equality in their workplaces. Recommendation 4: reduce the regulatory burden for employers by replacing and refining particular ‘pain point’ questions in the WGEA reporting components including removing the ‘reporting levels to CEO’ question. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Covid, inequality and poverty in 2020 and 2021 : How poverty & inequality were reduced in the Covid recession and increased during the recovery/ Peter Davidson (ACOSS) (University of New South Wales)

by Davidson, Peter | Australian Council of Social Service | University of New South Wales.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. : Australian Council of Social Services ; UNSW Sydney, 2022Description: 49 p.. : ill. (Online Resource).Other title: A tale of two pandemics : COVID, inequality and poverty in 2020 and 2021.Online Access: Website Summary: This report summarises evidence on the impact of the COVID recession and recovery on income inequality and poverty in Australia, including new ABS data tracking inequality during 2020 and 2021. The data tell a tale of two very different pandemic experiences: In 2020, income inequality and poverty declined during the ‘Alpha’ wave of the pandemic despite the deepest recession in a century and an ‘effective unemployment rate’ reaching 17%, due to robust public income supports – JobKeeper Payment and Coronavirus Supplement. In the first half of 2021, employment and earnings recovered but these income supports were withdrawn. The available evidence indicates that income inequality and poverty increased above pre-pandemic levels. In September 2021, with half the population back under lockdown in response to the ‘Delta’ wave of the pandemic, the effective unemployment rate was 9%. COVID income supports in response to the Delta wave were much weaker, as over 80% of people on the lowest income support payments were excluded from the COVID Disaster payment. Those payments have now been phased out. The legacy of the two pandemic experiences is likely to be higher inequality and poverty than beforehand, despite remarkable progress in reducing both in 2020. By September 2021 there were 1.7 million people on the lowest income support payments (25% more than before the pandemic) and those payments still sit below the poverty line. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Fixing temporary skilled migration : a better deal for Australia / Brendan Coates, Henry Sherrell, and Will Mackey (GI)

by Coates, Brendan | Grattan Institute | Sherrell, Henry | Mackey, Will.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2022Description: 76 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Website (incl chart data) Summary: This report calls for a new visa, the Temporary Skilled Worker (TSW) visa, to replace the existing Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa. Employers would use the Temporary Skilled Worker visa to sponsor workers in any occupation, provided the job pays more than $70,000 a year and the worker is paid at least as much as an Australian doing the same job. Labour agreements, which permit sponsorship for lower-wage jobs, would also be abolished. We calculate that under our plan, the number of full-time jobs eligible for temporary sponsorship would rise from about 44 per cent today to up to 66 per cent. The new TSW visa should be made portable, so temporary skilled migrants could more easily switch sponsoring employers should they find a better job once in Australia. This would enable migrants to walk away from employers who mistreat them. The federal government should better enforce the rules on temporary sponsorship, and uphold the labour rights of sponsored workers. Enforcement today appears almost non-existent. Compliance activities must increase to weed out bad-faith employers who abuse their workers. The Department of Home Affairs should conduct more random audits and invest more capacity in data-matching, to ensure employers are paying sponsored workers what they were promised. Exclusively targeting high-wage jobs for temporary sponsorship would mean sponsorship could be simplified for employers. A monthly fee should replace most upfront costs. Labour-market testing doesn’t work and should be scrapped. Sponsorship should be streamlined foraccredited employers who sponsor especially high-wage workers. A better-targeted, streamlined temporary skilled work visa would lift Australians’ living standards, attract global talent, boost the budget, and reduce exploitation of workers. That’s a good deal for all Australians Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Return to the family safety net? : economic security as Life Chances participants turn 30 / Ursula Harrison and Dina Bowman (SPARC)

by Harrison, Ursula | Brotherhood of St Laurence Social Policy and Research Centre | Bowman, Dina.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 42 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: At a glance: Turning 30 has been associated with the establishment of a career, financial independence, family formation, home ownership and other signifiers of adulthood. Over the past three decades, economic and social change means that these expectations have been shaken and no longer hold true for many 30-year-olds. Of course, families have always provided support, but policy that relies on such support entrenches inequities, as not all families can provide the same level of support. This need to rely on the family safety net is a thread which runs through our examination of economic security among the 30-year-olds in our study. Dive deeper: The longitudinal Life Chances study arose from BSL’s concern about the level of child poverty in Australia and a desire to better understand what affects children’s life chances. It began with the parents of 167 infants born in two suburbs in inner Melbourne in 1990. The children were a representative cross-section of all births in the suburbs at that time (Gilley 1993). Each stage of the study has highlighted the impacts of advantage and disadvantage on life chances. Stage 12 focuses on economic security and financial wellbeing as participants approached 30, a threshold age. This report draws on: 85 About myself survey responses, collected in mid 2019 from the 125 remaining members of the original 167 Life Chances participants 26 interviews conducted in late 2019 (before the COVID-19 pandemic) with the (almost) 30-year-old participants, selected based on gender and childhood family income 14 interviews conducted in 2020 with parents from the original sample, to examine expectations and opportunities in 1990 and 2020. Changes in social and economic policies, and an increasingly targeted and conditional social security system, place greater emphasis on individual responsibility and personal resources, self-reliance and self‑provision. For some 30-year-olds, knowing that they could ‘lean into their privilege’ and call on the family safety net when times were tough, the impacts of financial insecurity were somewhat cushioned. Others did not have the same options, and without secure ongoing employment building a savings buffer or buying a house were retreating dreams. Policies that force a return to reliance on family support, described by Esping-Andersen (1999) as familialism, reinforce intergenerational social inequalities because families with limited resources have less capacity to provide this support. Reversing the drift towards familialism requires a commitment to policies focused on creating a just and equitable future for all. This would see investment in sustainable and inclusive jobs, quality education, affordable health care, housing and child care. It would include providing adequate social security to meet current and future challenges. ; CONTENTS: Summary 4 -- 1 INTRODUCTION 8 -- Changing policy context 8 -- Social and economic policy has increased intergenerational inequalities 12 -- A longitudinal approach can shed light on the impacts of these shifts 13 -- Structure of the report 13 -- 2 STAGE 12 OF THE LIFE CHANCES STUDY 14 -- Recruitment 14 -- Data collection 14 -- Analysis 16 -- Ethics 17 -- Limitations 17 – 3 INEQUALITIES AND THE UNEVEN IMPACTS OF ECONOMIC INSECURITY 18 -- A broken compact between education and employment 19 -- Increasingly conditional income support 22 -- Gendered financial impacts of parenting 24 -- The retreating dream of home ownership 26 -- Financial wellbeing undermined 31 -- 4 DISCUSSION 35 -- The steps to secure work are uncertain 35 -- Patterns of gender inequality persist, especially for parents 35 -- Home ownership is being displaced by investment 35 -- Economic insecurity increases reliance on the family safety net 36 -- 5 CONCLUSION 37 -- A return to the family safety net exacerbates inequality 37 -- Investment in social infrastructure would even up the odds 38 -- Next steps 39 --REFERENCES 40Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
VET as a re-engagement pathway for early school leavers / Patrick Lim (NCVER)

by Lim, Patrick | National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, SA : National Centre for Vocational Education Research, 2022; © Commonwealth of Australia, 2022Description: 44 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: School non-completion and non-completers’ subsequent pathways into employment or back into education are enduring issues for policy-makers in Australia. Understanding the factors that predict a higher probability of leaving school before completing Year 12, as well as those that increase the chance of reengaging with education, can inform action on how best to support young people in their decision-making. An analysis of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) confirms that vocational education and training (VET) is an important pathway to educational re-engagement for young people who leave school before completing Year 12. This analysis also highlights the importance of providing career information not only to young people before and after they leave school, but also to their parents or guardians. For school leavers, having parents with aspirations for them is influential in determining whether early school leavers re-engage with education, demonstrating the value of ensuring that parents also have access to high-quality career information. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Public hearing 10 : education and training of health professionals in relation to people with cognitive disability / Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability

by Australia. Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability.

Publisher: [Brisbane] : Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect & Exploitation of People with Disability. 2022Description: ii, 83 p. PDF.Other title: Education and training of health professionals in relation to people with cognitive disability.Online Access: Research report | Research report (easy read version) | Website Summary: This hearing examined the education and training of health professionals and allied health professionals, including medical practitioners, nurses, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and speech pathologists, in relation to the health care and treatment of people with cognitive disability. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Cry me a river : the tragedy of the Murray-Darling basin / Margaret Simons.

by Simons, Margaret [author.].

Publisher: Carlton, VIC : Black Inc., 2020Description: 150 p.Other title: Quarterly essay. | QE 77 2020.Summary: The Murray-Darling Basin is the food bowl of Australia, and it's in trouble. What does this mean for the future - for water and crops, and for the people and towns that depend on it? In Cry Me a River, acclaimed journalist Margaret Simons takes a trip through the Basin, all the way from Queensland to South Australia. She shows that its plight is environmental but also economic, and enmeshed in ideology and identity. Her essay is both a portrait of the Murray-Darling Basin and an explanation of its woes. It looks at rural Australia and the failure of politics over decades to meet the needs of communities forced to bear the heaviest burden of change. Whether it is fish kills or state rivalries, drought or climate change, in the Basin our ability to plan for the future is being put to the test.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Opening doors : celebrating the work of the Ecumenical Migration Centre 1956 - 2016 / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2016Description: [25 p.] : ill. PDF.Other title: Opening doors.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Ecumenical Migration Centre – which formalised long-held ties with the Brotherhood of St Laurence in 1999 – has been at the forefront of providing practical responses to the challenges of settlement in Australia. This publication captures some highlights over the past 60 years, and in its modest way, offers a mirror to the progress of our diverse nation with its rich waves of migration and refugee settlement that have greatly enhanced our society. The diverse Australians the centre has worked with include European migrants in the 1950s and 1960s, Turkish and Indochinese arrivals in the 1970s and 1980s and, more recently, we have been working with Australians of Middle-Eastern and African descent. I’m proud that my predecessors at the Brotherhood supported the efforts of the precursor European Australian Christian Fellowship in 1956, and then later the union with the Ecumenical Migration Centre. Today, under the banner of the Multicultural Communities Team, we build on this legacy, harnessing community goodwill and volunteer efforts to build cohesion and resilience. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Ask what we want : ensure employment services encourage meaningful work for people with disability / PWDA and the Antipoverty Centre

by O’Connell, Kristin | People with Disability Australia (pwda) | Coonan, Jay | Antipoverty Centre.

Publisher: Surry Hills, Sydney : People with Disability Australia, 2022Description: 88 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Submission (Online Resource) Summary: The issues people with disability face finding long-term sustainable employment are systemic. Our barriers are based in ingrained discrimination in society. Many are the result of accumulated disadvantage that arise from our experiences of education, high rates of poverty, inadequate access to healthcare and exclusion from social participation. Employment services cannot overcome these barriers in isolation. This submission is dedicated to identifying the potential for employment services to support us – people with disability – into sustainable open employment in concert with making other necessary policy changes Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Wirkara Kulpa - Aboriginal youth justice strategy 2022-2032 / Victorian Aboriginal Justice Agreement ; Department of Justice and Community Safety

by Victorian Aboriginal Justice Agreement | Victoria. Department of Justice and Community Safety.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Victorian Government, 2022Description: 60 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Wirkara Kulpa (the Strategy) is the first Aboriginal youth justice strategy in Victoria - it has been developed with the wellbeing of Aboriginal children and young people at its heart. It is a strategy written for and by Aboriginal children and young people and captures the aspirations and changes Aboriginal children and young people want to see in a culturally safe and responsive youth justice system. It is also a strategy that is focused on supporting Aboriginal children and young people so they remain outside the youth justice system and can live culturally rich lives. It has been led by the Aboriginal Justice Caucus, under the umbrella of the Aboriginal Justice Agreement, and is a key initiative of Burra Lotjpa Dunguludja (AJA4), and the Youth Justice Strategic Plan 2020-2030. Like Burra Lotjpa Dunguludja (AJA4), the Strategy aims to further the principle of self-determination and is another important step towards meeting the joint Aboriginal community and Victorian Government commitment to improving justice outcomes for Aboriginal people and closing the gap in the rate of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people under Youth Justice supervision by 2031. It has been developed in parallel with the Koori Youth Justice Taskforce and responds to 56 recommendations of the combined report from the Taskforce and the Our Youth Our Way (2021) Inquiry led by the Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People. The Strategy was developed and led from the outset by the Aboriginal Justice Caucus. This process commenced with a planning workshop in 2018 where Caucus outlined their aspirations for, and approach to, creating Victoria’s first Aboriginal youth justice strategy. Figure 1 is a visual representation of Caucus’ plan developed on that day. -- p. 8 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Covid-19 : housing market impacts and housing policy responses - an international review / Hal Pawson, Chris Martin, Fatemeh Aminpour et al. (ACOSS) (City Futures Research,UNSW)

by Pawson, Hal | Australian Council of Social Service | Martin, Chris | Aminpour, Fatemeh et al | University of New South Wales. City Futures Research Centre.

Publisher: Strawberry Hills, N.S.W. : Australian Council of Social Services ; University of New South Wales, 2022Description: [66 p.] (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report is the third in a series of reports written and produced for the ACOSS/UNSW Sydney Poverty and Inequality Partnership by Hal Pawson, Chris Martin and Fatemeh Aminpour at the City Futures Research Centre at UNSW Sydney along with Kenneth Gibb from the University of Glasgow and Chris Foye from the University of Reading. This report has also received support from Mission Australia, National Shelter (on behalf of NSW Shelter and Shelter WA) and Queensland Shelter. The purpose of this series of reports is to look at the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on housing and homelessness policy. This third report looks at the effects of these policy changes in Australia and other high-income countries including Canada, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Spain and the US. Studying this range of countries gives the opportunity to compare similar jurisdictions with a variety of housing regimes and national governance systems. ; UNSW Sydney-ACOSS Poverty and Inequality Partnership We extend our sincere gratitude to the ACOSS members and philanthropists who continue to support this vital research partnership, including Anglicare Australia; Australian Red Cross; the Australian Communities Foundation Impact Fund (and three subfunds – Hart Line, Raettvisa and the David Morawetz Social Justice Fund); the BB and A Miller Foundation; the Brotherhood of St Laurence; cohealth, a Victorian community health service; Good Shepherd Australia New Zealand; Mission Australia; the St Vincent de Paul Society; the Salvation Army; and The Smith Family. Includes bibliographical references. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
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