Brotherhood of St Laurence

Shelley Mallett

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Steering social innovation : community agencies and the commissioning of Education First Youth Foyers / Shelley Mallett, Danielle Thornton and David Bryant

by Mallett, Shelley | Thornton, Danielle | Bryant, David.

Publisher: Carlton, Vic. : Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG), 2018Description: 12 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: In the late 2000s, conversations between the CEOs of two Melbourne-based non-profits – Tony Nicholson of the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) and Tony Keenan of Hanover Welfare Services1 – revealed a shared frustration with the inadequacy of services designed to address youth homelessness. Both men thought that a narrow focus on crisis support and accommodation had led to a service system that was ill-equipped to address the reasons why some young people become homeless and why many struggle to escape the cycle of poverty and homelessness. They agreed that a new approach was needed, but it took years for a firm proposal to take shape, and longer still for the opportunity for change to present itself. But in the spring of 2010, with a close state election contest on the horizon, the leadership of both organisations saw a chance to win political support for innovation. The idea for a new approach to youth homelessness had fermented for years by the time Nicholson and Keenan developed their proposal for purpose-built student accommodation to be based on the principles of the UK Foyer Federation. There had been Foyers in Australia since the 1990s but none that specifically tied accommodation to participation in education as a precursor to sustainable employment and stable housing ; This case was written by Professor Shelley Mallett of the University of Melbourne and the Brotherhood of St Laurence, and Dr Danielle Thornton and David Bryant of the Brotherhood of St Laurence. It is based on original research conducted by the authors and is intended as a basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate either effective or ineffective handling of a managerial situation.; ANZSOG Case Program 2018-202.1; CC BY-NC-NDAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
From social security to welfare conditionality : the shifting principles behind the trajectory of Australian welfare policy

by Thornton, Danielle | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Bowman, Dina | Mallett, Shelley | Cooney-O'Donoghue, Diarmuid.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence 2018Description: 19 slides [Power point presentation].Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Presentation prepared for symposium Welfare to work in UK and Australia, 25 September 2018. Symposium co-hosted by the Brotherhood of St Laurence and the University of Melbourne. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Making the leap : a practical guide to inter-agency collaboration

by Thornton, Danielle | Bryant, David | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2018; Carlton, Vic. Australia and New Zealand School of Government 2018Description: 11 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Government and community-sector agencies have an equal stake in producing better social services. There is new interest in effective collaboration and pooling of complementary expertise. Making the leap aims to fill a gap in the literature on collaboration by sharing practical insights drawn from interviews with public and community sector managers with recent first-hand experience of inter-agency and cross-sectoral collaboration. It is hoped that the tips contained here will offer concrete guidance for managers who want to ‘make the leap’ from cooperation to genuine collaboration with like-minded agencies. This practical guide is part of a broader research project examining collaborative forms of commissioning, funded by the Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG) and undertaken by the Brotherhood of St Laurence. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Improving the health of older aged care workers

by Hart, Aaron | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Bowman, Dina | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 12 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: A study of older ‘pink collar’ workers in aged care points to the need for policy and practice changes to ensure Australia has enough skilled workers to provide quality care and to protect and support the physical and emotional health of those workers. This study is situated at the confluence of three policy concerns. The first arises from a push to extend the working lives and the participation of older adults in the labour force. Policy makers have argued that this is a justified response to the cost of supporting an ageing population (Department of the Treasury 2015). The second concern is with the effects on workers when aged care is conceptualised as a marketplace in which consumers make informed decisions about the care they wish to receive. Our third concern is with the crisis in the aged care workforce. Maintaining and developing this workforce is critical, and requires a focus on job quality and employment conditions. Our findings suggest that the health of older aged care workers can be improved—and in some instances, working lives extended—through three measures: • mandatory minimum hours of care per client in residential facilities • employment conditions to improve ‘time and income capability’ • a professionalisation agenda with three elements: ―― professional registration to enhance autonomy and care quality ―― clinical supervision to address emotional depletion ―― training and supervision for specialist roles. This small study is one component of the larger Working Well Working Wisely project funded by the Australian Research Council. The ARC Linkage project comprises five studies, each taking a different approach to informing policy development around older workers and their workplaces. It brings together researchers from the Australian National University, the federal departments of Social Services and Employment, the Brotherhood of St Laurence, the University of Melbourne, Safe Work Australia and Queensland Treasury. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Reclaiming social security for a just future : a principled approach to reform

by Bowman, Dina | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Thornton, Danielle | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 12 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Working PaperSummary: In this working paper, the authors propose five indivisible principles to underpin Australia’s social security system so that it contributes to a just, fair and compassionate society. Our social security system is ill equipped to respond to current and future technological, demographic, environmental and geopolitical challenges. The authors argue that social security needs to be reframed as being there for ‘for all of us’, emphasising the unpredictability of life events such as becoming disabled or experiencing an unexpected health downturn, becoming a carer to a child or partner, or experiencing family violence leading to homelessness. Principles from Australia’s past and from overseas provide much food for thought. The aim of this paper is to start a wider conversation about how Australia can enable economic security for all, now and in the future Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Starting a future that means something to you : outcomes from a longitudinal study of Education First Youth Foyers

by Coddou, Marion | Borlagdan, Joseph | Mallett, Shelley | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Launch Housing.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019; Collingwood, Vic. Launch Housing 2019Description: 55 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Education First Youth Foyers outcomes report.Online Access: Report | Summary Notes: Also includes link to "Starting a future that means something to you: outcomes from a longitudinal study of Education First Youth Foyers – summary"Summary: This report presents the outcomes from a five-year longitudinal study of Education First Youth Foyers. Developed by the Brotherhood of St Laurence and Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing) with funding from the Victorian Government, Education First Youth (EFY) Foyers expand upon the original concept of youth foyers by prioritising education as key to a sustainable livelihood. They are better understood as a form of supported student accommodation rather than a crisis housing response. The EFY Foyer model is founded on a capabilities approach, which measures human development by people’s substantive freedoms, or real opportunities, to pursue lives of value to them. EFY Foyers seek to expand young people’s capabilities in two ways: by creating mainstream opportunities aligned with their goals and by developing the resources and skills needed to make the most of them. An Advantaged Thinking practice approach orients practitioners to working with young people in a way that recognises and invests in their aspirations and talents. Three EFY foyers – co-located with TAFEs in Glen Waverley and Broadmeadows in Melbourne and Shepparton in northern Victoria – each house 40 young people in studio-style accommodation with shared communal areas, supported by trained staff. Participants and staff commit to a reciprocal ‘Deal’: young people agree to participate in education and five other EFY Foyer service offers, and in return, foyer staff agree to provide them with accommodation, opportunities and inclusion in a learning community for up to two years. The outcomes study undertaken as part of the EFY Foyer evaluation finds that the model substantively improves participants’ education, employment, housing, and health and wellbeing outcomes, and these improvements are largely sustained a year after exit. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Changing children's trajectories : results of the HIPPY Longitudinal Study / Julie Connolly & Shelley Mallett (BSL.RPC)

by Connolly, Julie | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St. Laurence, 2020Description: 69 p. : . ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The most comprehensive study to date has investigated the impact of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) on the Australian children and parents who take part. At a glance The Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) is an early learning and parenting program targeting four and five-year-old children in low-income households. It provides parents with the confidence, knowledge and tools to support their child's education and helps them create a home learning environment. Doing HIPPY improves their child's school readiness and parent–child relationships. Key findings include: •Not only did parents enjoy the program; they transformed the home learning environment and spent more time on learning activities with their children •At commencement, HIPPY children on average scored below the Australian mean on a test of literacy and numeracy. After completing HIPPY, children’s average score was above the relevant Australian mean. •Their improvement suggests HIPPY leads to a changed learning trajectory for children, not just a developmental gain that might be expected with age. •In this way HIPPY works to redress the negative impact of poverty and financial hardship on child development. Dive deeper Delivered in over 100 Australian communities facing socioeconomic disadvantage, HIPPY is an integrated parenting support and early learning program that works to increase parents’ confidence as their child’s first teacher and to reconfigure the home learning environment in order to improve children’s school readiness. The HIPPY Longitudinal Study found a strong theoretical and empirical foundation for the program design. Parents were successfully engaged, indicating high levels of satisfaction with key aspects of the program. They actively reconfigured the home learning environment using HIPPY’s distinctive pedagogical practices and activities. Attending HIPPY group meetings helped parents improve their child learning outcomes. Close to program commencement, the average performance of HIPPY children on a test of literacy and numeracy skills was below the Australian mean. After completing HIPPY, on average, HIPPY children performed above the relevant Australian mean. This suggests a changed learning trajectory, not just a developmental gain, indicating that HIPPY works to redress the negative impact of poverty and financial hardship on child development. The HLS also revealed a subset of families who face additional challenges owing to their complex circumstances. This suggests opportunities for adaptation and extra support during the transition to school. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Scheduling longer working lives for older aged care workers : a time and income capability approach

by Hart, Aaron | Bowman, Dina | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Time & Society 2020Description: PDF.Notes: From Time & Society 0 (0), 1-21 Article; Authors: Aaron Hart, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. And Brotherhood of St Laurence, Fitzroy, Australia ; Dina Bowman, Brotherhood of St Laurence, Fitzroy, Australia ; Shelley Mallett ,University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. And Brotherhood of St Laurence, Fitzroy, AustraliaSummary: Like many other countries, Australian government policy focuses on extending working life as a response to concern about the cost of an ageing population. In this article, we focus on older aged care workers and highlight how poor employment conditions hinder their capacity to work in later life. Many of these workers are at risk of time and income poverty, since they are on low wage, part-time, low-hour contracts and need to pick up extra shifts to earn a living wage. The interactions between time poverty and income poverty have been developed within a body of literature that analyses the quantities of time individuals and households allocate to paid employment, household, family and caring responsibilities, sleep and self-care. Burchardt’s notion of ‘time and income capability’ brings insights from this corpus into dialogue with the breadth of realistic opportunities for people to do things that they have reason to value. This study uses Burchardt’s construct to analyse qualitative data from interviews with 20 older personal care workers. While all the workers we spoke with engaged in self-sustaining practices, there were varying levels of opportunity to pursue them. Workers with less time and income capability found it more difficult to sustain themselves and their households. Some employer practices diminished workers’ time and income capability: unrealistic workloads necessitating unpaid hours; providing little opportunity for input into rostering; and late-notice roster changes. When time and income capability was too low, workers’ informal care duties, social connections and health were compromised. In the Australian aged care sector, several changes can enable longer working lives: sufficient paid hours to perform the role, wage loading for hours in addition to those contracted, written notice for roster changes, and increased wages.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Better futures : advantaged thinking practice framework / Joe Howie with Emma Cull, Sally James and Shelley Mallett

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Howie, Joe | Cull, Emma | James, Sully | Mallett, Shelley | Victorian Government.

Edition: 2nd ed.Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 69 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: This second edition published in March 2020 The Better Futures Advantaged Thinking Practice Framework is supported by the Victorian Government.; The content for this Practice Framework was developed by the Youth Transitions Service Development Team at the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) supported by the Children, Youth and Families Unit within the Victorian Government Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The BSL team includes: + Joe Howie (Program Manager, Youth Transitions) + Emma Cull (Policy, Research and Service Development Manager, Youth Transitions) + Sally James (Principal Advisor for Youth Transitions) + Professor Shelley Mallett (General Manager, BSL Research and Policy Centre) + Niamh McTiernan (former Practice and Service Development Manager, Youth Transitions) + Jade Purtell (Service Development Coordinator, Out-of-Home and Leaving Care) The Framework draws on the Education First Youth Foyer Practice Framework, which was inspired by the work of Colin Falconer, who first developed Advantaged Thinking during his time as Director of Innovation and Strategy at the United Kingdom (UK) Foyer Federation. We would also like to acknowledge and thank Barwon Child, Youth & Family and Jo Buick, Sinead Gibney-Hughes, Diane Brown, Gail Jessen and Helen Philp for their contribution to the development of this Practice Framework. Summary: Developed by the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services in consultation with the sector, Better Futures is a new practice model guided by this Framework to support young people transitioning from care. For young people to develop skills, networks and capabilities towards sustainable independence they need access to community assets, institutions, services and people within the community who value their individual qualities, experiences and preferences. They also need access to supportive professionals who can help them to see opportunities and work towards their aspirations. As such, this Framework looks at the various aspects of support needed as they relate to practice, collaboration and the service delivery outlined.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Everyone counts : uncovering patterns of Newstart Allowance / Dina Bowman, Marcus Banks, Peter Whiteford, Ashton de Silva, Nandini Anantharama, Zsuzsanna Csereklyei and Shelley Mallett

by Bowman, Dina | Banks, Marcus | Whiteford, Peter | de Silva, Ashton | Anantharam, Nandini | Csereklyei, Zsuzsanna | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 32 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: One line intro What insights about income support can be gained from daily, event-based data about recipients of Newstart Allowance from 2001 to 2016? At a glance This flow data shows that • receiving Newstart Allowance (which preceded JobSeeker Payment) is more widespread than is generally understood. • more than 4.4 million people received NSA at some stage between 2001 and 2016. • the percentage of women among NSA recipients increased from 30% in 2001 to 46% in 2016. • nearly half (46%) of recipients received at least one payment in only one or two of the 16 years, while almost 30% received payments in five years or more. • payment suspensions, which contribute to income volatility, have increased dramatically. Dive deeper Our analysis of administrative social security data aimed to gain a clearer understanding of income volatility in Australia. The focus is on unemployed and underemployed Australians who received Newstart Allowance (NSA1)—a group of individuals highly exposed to the risks of financial insecurity. The study drew on DOMINO (Data Over Multiple Individual Occurrences), a Department of Social Services database that records all interactions with Centrelink since 2001. This daily, event-based data provides an important opportunity to track individual patterns of NSA receipt over a 16-year period (2001–2016). Our findings highlight some significant misunderstandings about the scale, scope and conditionality of Newstart Allowance receipt. While longer-term reliance on NSA is an important policy issue, short-term reliance is underestimated. An increasing share of recipients—especially women—are facing irregular payments due to suspensions. Our analysis raises questions about the extent to which the Australian social security system is fulfilling its mission to improve the lifetime wellbeing of individuals and families. This baseline study is part of a larger research program investigating the relationship between income volatility and social security payments. The program involves researchers from the Australian National University, the Brotherhood of St. Laurence and RMIT University. ; December 2020 Research team: Australian National University Professor : Peter Whiteford ; Brotherhood of St. Laurence : Dr Dina Bowman Professor Shelley Mallett ; RMIT University: Associate Professor Ashton de Silva Dr Marcus Banks Ms Nandini Anantharama Dr Zsuzsanna Csereklyei Bibliography : p. 27-29; Contents : Summary -- 1 Income volatility and social security -- Adequacy and income security – Newstart Allowance -- 2 The study – Method --- 3 Newstart Allowance receipt: a common and uncertain experience --- Many of us receive NSA at some stage – Social security payment suspensions contribute to income volatility – 4 Everyone counts – Next steps – References – Technical note Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Young people and vocational education and training (VET) / Kira Clarke, Joseph Borlagdan & Shelley Mallett, RPC

by Clarke, Kira | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Borlagdan, Joseph | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 7 p. PDF.Other title: Youth and vocational education and training (COVID-19 Insights).Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The economic and social fall-out of the COVID-19 pandemic for young people aged 15 to 24 has been disproportionately severe and will have long lasting effects. Young people who were already experiencing educational marginalisation associated with demographic and geographic characteristics are most at risk of the compounding impact of COVID-19 on their access to employment, education and training opportunities and outcomes. The youth labour market will be slow to recover. Young workers are concentrated in service industries and low-skill jobs that have been most affected by the social distancing measures and economic downturn. Young people are likely to experience slow labour market recovery due to a reliance on sectors with high rates of part-time work, low-skilled work and casualised or precarious work. The digital divide is amplified. The shift of education systems and employment services to digital and remote mass delivery is most difficult for those young people who cannot afford the atest technology or lack confidence using it. The effects on employment and incomes could be long-lasting. Young people who are just beginning their working lives are vulnerable to the long-term scarring effects of labour market exclusion. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Safety net to poverty trap? The twentieth-century origins of Australia's uneven social security system / Danielle Thornton, Dina Bowman and Shelley Mallett (BSL.RPC)

by Thornton, Danielle | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Bowman, Dina | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 39 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Tracing the history of Australia’s social security system helps us to consider what reforms are needed for the present day. This paper explores how our social security system has developed over more than 100 years since Federation, and why it is no longer suitable for our changing world. As it stands, our social security system is a relic of the last century. It was designed to complement a group of economic policies that established employment as the foundation of economic security. Since these policies were dismantled, paid work has become more precarious and incomes have become more volatile. The system designed as a safety net has, for too many households, become a poverty trap. By laying bare the origins of our social security system—the shifting conditions and historical accidents that have shaped it—this paper provides the background for a discussion of the types of reform needed to rebuild a system equipped to respond to the social and economic conditions of this century. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Children and young people on the edge of care, out of home and alone / David Politanski, Joseph Borlagdan, Shelley Mallett, RPC

by Politanski, David | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Borlagdan, Joseph | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 9 p. PDF.Other title: Children on the edge of care, out of home and alone (COVID-19 Insights) | COVID-19 Insights : Children on the edge of care, out of home and alone.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Every year across Australia thousands of children and young people under 16 leave home or go missing from out-of-home care placements. Yet no comprehensive response to this problem exists in any state or territory. Programs to identify children and young people at risk are patchy and under-resourced, and specialist crisis services non-existent. Children may be referred back and forth between service sectors without receiving the care and support they need. COVID-19 is making the problem worse, and unless timely action is taken, more children and young people will fall through the gaps. We propose a new approach based on 'extreme' collaboration across agencies, to provide the care children and young people need to thrive. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Findings briefing : roundtable consultations with disadvantaged learners in VET to inform Skills for Victoria's Growing Economy Review / prepared by Kira Clarke, Shelley Mallett and Joseph Borlagdan (BSL.RPC)

by Clarke, Kira | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Mallett, Shelley | Borlagdan, Joseph.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.), 2020Description: 8 p.Other title: Roundtable consultations with disadvantaged learners in VET to inform Skills for Victoria’s Growing Economy Review.Summary: Engaging with disadvantaged VET learners: During the period July 21 to August 6th, 10 small focus groups were facilitated with a total of 33 current VET learners, recruited from eight Victorian RTOs. The final sample included: 21 women and 12 men ; 13 participants identifying two or more equity characteristics ; 19 participants living with a disability ; 1 indigenous participant ; 11 participants from a language background other than English (LBOTE) ; 9 participants with below Year 12 schooling ; 19 participants who were experiencing or had experience of long term unemployment ; 30 participants in the lowest 3 declines of SEIFA Understanding the learner journey: The focus group interview instrument was informed by the review of existing literature, including the temporal framework offered by Morgan, Chiem and Ambaye (2004) that identifies three stages in the VET experience: participation, progression and outcomes; and the Equity Outcomes Framework, developed through the former National VET Equity Advisory Council (Rothman et al. 2013) that used participation, achievement and transition to gauge the progress made by specific equity groups. Questions were designed to generate an understanding of experiences and challenges faced by disadvantaged learners throughout their VET journey: • Entry to VET: Motivations for engaging in VET; sources of information that shaped VET choices and decisions; expectations of what VET learning would be like and how it would meet learner objectives • Progression through VET: Positive experiences within VET that enabled progression; challenges faced throughout the VET journey; reasons for, sources of and benefits of supports received • Anticipated outcomes from VET: challenges in transitioning to employment and/or further study. – page 1 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Extending the working lives of older personal care workers in the aged care sector [Journal article]

by Hart, Aaron | Bowman, Dina | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Australian Nursing & Midwifery Journal 2020Description: PDF.Notes: From Australian Nursing & Midwifery Journal, Jul-Sep 2020, Volume 26, No.11 Article, pp 36-39; Authors: Aaron Hart, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. And Brotherhood of St Laurence, Fitzroy, Australia ; Dina Bowman, Brotherhood of St Laurence, Fitzroy, Australia ; Shelley Mallett ,University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. And Brotherhood of St Laurence, Fitzroy, Australia; This work was supported by an Australian Research Council linkage Project grant entitled "Working longer, staying healthy and keeping productive". This project brings together research from the Australian National University, the federal department of Social Services and Employment, the Brotherhood of St Laurence, the University of Melbourne, Safe Work Australia and Queensland Treasury. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Environmental scan part 2 : views of experts on effective employment interventions for people with disability / Shelley Mallett, Diane Brown and James Finnis (BSL)

by Mallett, Shelley | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Brown, Diane | Finnis, James.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 26 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Environmental Scan Part 2 (Research Report) | Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability Project [Website] Notes: Environmental Scan part 1 and Environment Scan Part 2 are linked to the Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability project. To learn more about the project click the website link. Summary: This report details findings from Part 2 of an Environmental Scan of current practice of employment interventions and research for people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability. The Environmental Scan includes: 1. A desktop scan of current and recent Australian research; and current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally (2015-2021 inclusive) (Environmental Scan Part 1: desktop review of current research and interventions to promote economic participation of people with a disability). 2. Interviews and focus groups with experts in the disability employment policy and program field (presented in this report). This Environmental Scan is one component of a broader project commissioned by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) designed to examine the scope and evidence for different interventions that improve the economic participation and employment of people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disabilities. The project will help provide the NDIA with the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of different employment interventions. Alongside the Environmental Scan, the full project also includes a Systematic Review, including a review of the theoretical evidence (see Systematic Review Technical Report and Summary Report). Scope of the Environmental Scan Part 2: This report addresses the third question proposed by the NDIA for the Environmental Scan: what are the views of experts in the field on effective employment interventions for people with a disability (with a focus on people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability)? The report details findings from a series of focus groups and interviews with academics and senior government and non-government executives who hold deep expertise in disability employment policy and programs. Interviews and focus groups were conducted over a one-month period at the end of 2020. Participating experts were invited to provide insight into the critical aspects of effective employment programs and practices based on their knowledge and experience. Focus group and interview discussions centred around three key sub-questions in relation to the disability employment intervention field: What is working? ; What is not working? ; What is missing? ; ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Time for good care and job quality : managing stress among older workers in the aged care sector [Journal article] / Aaron Hart, Dina Bowman & Shelley Mallett

by Hart, Aaron | Bowman, Dina | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Journal of Aging & Social Policy, 2021Description: 18 p.Summary: Improved job quality will make longer working lives in the aged care sector more sustainable. We interviewed 20 older aged care workers to identify which job characteristics are significant for health and to identify policy remedies. Workers take pleasure and pride in responding autonomously to a care recipient’s situation, developing understanding, maintaining morale and performing intimate bodily care with dignity. However, a shortage of staff time requires workers to take a task-oriented approach. This causes worker stress and diminishes their desire and capacity to delay retirement. In the Australian context, regulating minimum staffing is the most suitable policy response.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Environmental scan part 1 : current research and evaluation to promote economic participation of people with disability / Diane Brown and Shelley Mallett (BSL)

by Brown, Diane | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 102 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Environmental Scan Part 1 (Research Report) | Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability Project [Website] Notes: Environmental Scan part 1 and Environment Scan Part 2 are linked to the Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability project. To learn more about the project click the website link. Summary: This report details findings from Part 1 of a two-part Environmental Scan of current practice of employment interventions and research for people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability. The Environmental Scan includes: 1. A desktop scan of current and recent Australian research; and current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally (2015-2021 inclusive) 2. Interviews and focus groups with experts in the disability employment policy and program field (presented in a second report, Environmental Scan Part 2: Views of experts in the field on effective employment interventions for people with a disability). This Environmental Scan is one component of a broader project commissioned by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) designed to examine the scope and evidence for different interventions that improve the economic participation and employment of people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disabilities. The project will help provide the NDIA with the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of different employment interventions. Alongside the Environmental Scan, the full project also includes a Systematic Review, including a review of the theoretical evidence (see Systematic Review Technical Report, and Summary Report). Scope of the Environmental Scan Part 1 Part 1 of the Environmental Scan set out to map the current landscape of research and interventions aimed at promoting economic participation of people with a disability (with a focus on the three target populations) and identify promising areas of practice or innovation. This report addresses two of the three questions proposed by the NDIA for the Environmental Scan: 1. What research aimed at improving employment participation of people with either autism, intellectual disability or psychosocial disability is currently underway? 2. What are the applicable current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally? Part 1 of the Environmental Scan is primarily descriptive with some limited analysis of the quality of intervention (using meta-evaluation) and identification of gaps and indicators of innovation. -- p. 3 ; ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Home learning with HIPPY : results and learning from the HIPPY Longitudinal Study and the HIPPY Tutors Study / Julie Connolly and Shelley Mallett (BSL)

by Connolly, Julie | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St. Laurence, 2022Description: 37 slides [Power point presentation]. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Structure of this Presentation: Introduction to the HIPPY program - including a broad overview of the history and the components of the program ; Presentation of the key findings of the HIPPY longitudinal study - Including discussion of the HLS methodology, theoretical foundations, and key findings ; Presentation of key findings of the HIPPY Tutor Study ; Workshop and Systems change and the Home Learning Environment - Core questions are on the following slide ; Key concepts: home learning environment, systems change, enabling organisations, developing capabilities, social justice and relational-cultural system dynamics ; Conclusion -Next steps for HIPPY, including the continued roll out of Age 3 curriculum and the HIPPY Indigenous Study – Slide 3; Presentation to AIFS conference Melbourne, 16 June 2022Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
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