Brotherhood of St Laurence

New Book List 2022

This list contains 166 titles

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Mid-term Review of the Disability Employment Services (DES) Program / Boston Consulting Group ; Department of Social Services

by Boston Consulting Group | Australia. Department of Social Services.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Department of Social Services, 2020Description: 178 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Disability Employment Services (DES) Program was reformed from 1 July 2018, with Grant Agreements in place until June 2023. This report is the mid-term review of the DES program, undertaken by Boston Consulting Group (BCG) on behalf of the Department of Social Services, between May and August 2020. BCG put forward suggestions, such as: Improving the delivery model so that participant and employer needs are better met ; Creating an integrated government approach to the provision of disability and employment support ; Addressing the sustainability of the DES program caseload and expenditure ; Ultimately, improving the number and quality of employment outcomes for people with disability. The Department of Social Services is committed to delivering effective supports to help people with disability into employment. The mid-term review informed improvements to the DES program, announced in the 2020-21 and 2021-22 Budgets. From mid-2021, public consultation will begin on a new disability employment services model to replace the current DES program, following the expiration of current arrangements on 30 June 2023. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Ending homelessness in Australia : an evidence and policy deep dive / Report prepared by Paul Flatau, Leanne Lester, Ami Seivwright et al (Centre for Social Impact)

by Flatau, Paul | Centre for Social Impact | Lester, Leanne | Seivwright, Ami et al.

Publisher: Perth : Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia, 2021Description: pp. col. ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Ending homelessness in Australia research report (Online Resource) | Bulletin No 1 Ending homelessness in Australia (Online Resource) | Bulletin No 2 Findings from the Advance to Zero database (Online Resource) | Website Summary: Ending homelessness in Australia: An evidence and policy deep dive is the latest research report (Feb 2022) in CSI's Deep Dive series, and has been created in partnerhip with the Australian Alliance to End Homelessness (AAEH) and Neami National. Completed by researchers from CSI UWA and UNSW, the objectives of the research are twofold. First, to collate and assess the current evidence base on the state of homelessness in Australia and its key drivers. Second, to set out an evidence-informed policy and practice agenda towards ending homelessness in Australia. Homelessness is a complex problem and, if we are to end it, we need to understand and engage all the levers available to us (whether they’re currently being used or not). This research report puts forward five key actions which are required to end homelessness in Australia: 1. Leadership and proactivity at the Australian Government level and a national end homelessness strategy. 2.An increase in the supply of social and affordable housing directed to an end homelessness goal 3.Comprehensive application of Housing First programs linked to supportive housing for those entering permanent housing with long histories of homelessness and high health and other needs 4.Targeted prevention and early intervention programs to turn off the tap of entry into homelessness which address the underlying drivers of homelessness 5.Supportive systems and programs which build the enablers of an end homelessness program: advocacy, commitment and resource flow to ending homelessness; effective service integration; culturally safe and appropriate service delivery; and improving data quality, evaluation and research around ending homelessness in Australia. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Service innovation deep dive : capturing and leveraging learnings from service innovation during COVID-19 / Centre for Social Impact

by Centre for Social Impact.

Publisher: Centre for Social Impact, 2021Description: pp. col. ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: National research report (Online Resource) | Research summary (Online Resource) | Western Australia research report (Online Resource) | Victoria research report (Online Resource) | New South Wales research report (Online Resource) | Website Summary: Service Innovation Deep Dive: Acknowledging the significant impact of COVID-19 on community services, a team of CSI researchers from UWA, Swinburne and UNSW sought to understand the ways in which organisations in the aged care, disability, and emergency relief sectors innovated during COVID-19, and the learnings, practices and activities they want to continue beyond the pandemic. Representatives from more than 34 organisations in Western Australia, Victoria and New South Wales were interviewed from late 2020 to early 2021 for the five-part Service Innovation Deep Dive, and the research was driven by the core questions: What have services done differently during the COVID-19 crisis and what do they want to do differently in their post-pandemic service delivery? Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Preparing for the Future of Work Across Australia / Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

Publisher: Paris : OECD Publishing, 2021Description: 155 p. (online resource).Other title: OECD reviews on local job creation .Online Access: Website Summary: COVID-19 is likely to leave long-lasting effects on local labour markets. It is accelerating a pre-existing trend towards automation, as firms look even more to new technologies to pandemic proof their operations. While automation offers the opportunity to boost productivity, it can also lead to job polarisation as vulnerable workers who lose their jobs may not have the skills needed in a changing labour market. This OECD report examines the potential impacts of automation on people and places across Australia. It also sheds light on policies and programmes that can help regions and cities to prepare for the future of work. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Class in Australia.

by Threadgold, Steven.(ed.) | Gerrard, Jessica (ed.).

Publisher: Clayton, Vic. Monash University Pub, 2022Description: 1 Volume. viii, 270 p.Summary: Two decades since it was claimed that class is dead, social, economic and cultural inequalities are rising. Though Australia is often described as a ‘lucky country’ with a strong economy, we are witness to intensifying inequality with entrenched poverty and the growth of precarious and insecure labour. The disconnect of the rusted-on Labor voter and the rise of far-right politics suggest there is an urgent need to examine the contemporary functions of class relations. Class analysis in Australia has always had a contested position. The prominence of scholarship from the UK and US has often meant class analysis in Australia has had little to say about its settler colonial history and the past and present dynamics of race and racism that are deeply embedded in social and labour relations. In the post-war turn away from Marx and subsequent embrace of Bourdieu, much sociological research on class has focused on explorations of consumption and culture. Long-standing feminist critiques of the absence of gendered labour in class analysis also pose challenges for understanding and researching class. At a time of deepening inequality, Class in Australia brings together a range of new and original research for a timely examination of class relations, labour exploitation, and the changing formations of work in contemporary Australian society. ‘This book is a powerful and vibrant study of the complex realities of class in modern Australia. It brings to light the intersection of class with gender, race, and the ongoing dispossession of First Nations peoples, and dispels the myth that class division is not relevant to the contemporary age.’ – Sally McManus, ACTU Secretary ‘From colonial inequality to Upper Middle Bogan, this captivating volume dives deep into how class has shaped our nation. Through studies of the unemployed, warehouse workers, unions and school students, this book presents the finest analysis of class that Australian sociology has to offer. Read it to get a richer understanding of poverty, a stronger sense of social status, and a nuanced analysis of how gender, race and sexuality intersect with class.’ – Andrew Leigh MP ‘Class is central to Australians’ lives but it is rarely analysed or even talked about. In this book Threadgold and Gerrard have pulled together the foremost thinkers on class, intersectionality and prejudice in Australia.’ – Hon Dr Meredith Burgmann AM ‘This is a must-read collection for anyone interested in the topic of class in Australia. This collection digs deeps and engages with relevant and timely discussions about class using both an historical and contemporary lens. For anyone who is teaching, studying, or writing about class as theory or method, this book will open up rich and productive conversations. Class is an enduring problematic, both as a descriptor, heuristic device or theoretical framework. This collection aptly responds to this problematic, engaging with class across multiple intersections including gender, race and space. It taps into class as symbolic and ephemeral whilst also highlighting the material, tangible divisions that it produces.’ – Dr. Emma Rowe, Senior Lecturer in Education, Deakin University ‘Class in Australia is a timely provocation to social scientists to rethink class, offering a series of deep reflections on the complexities and opportunities of class-based analysis. An inspiring collection of authors brings new questions, conceptual frameworks and methodologies to class analysis. Acknowledging that the dynamics of settler colonialism are central, this collection is positioned to invigorate familiar approaches focusing on education, migration, and labour, gender, sexuality, and cultural representations. The new class analysis starts here.’ – Johanna Wyn, Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor, The University of MelbourneAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Home Energy Assist - Affordable Retrofits : project evaluation report / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: unpub. © 2019Description: 154 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Victorian Government Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) engaged the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) to deliver the Home Energy Assist Affordable Retrofits Trial (HEAART) to provide access to energy efficiency upgrades and rooftop solar photovoltaics (PV) to 100 low-income and vulnerable Victorian households. The trial provided access to rooftop solar PV and energy efficiency upgrades through a co-funding model, whereby the cost of upgrades was split between the household and a contribution from the program. The upgrade packages represented “deep” retrofits, i.e. multiple upgrades to have a substantial impact on the household’s energy usage and/or comfort. This Evaluation Report should be read in conjunction with the Project Documentation Report (PDR). Revisiting the key metrics from the Project Documentation Report The PDR outlined key components of project delivery. In summary, between June 2019 and December 2018, during the pilot delivery phase: 88 households received upgrade packages ; 315 individual upgrades were installed ; 66 Scorecard assessments were delivered through the HEAART program Of the major upgrades installed, there were 67 reverse cycle air-conditioners, 13 solar PV systems, 16 gas heaters or ducting upgrades, 13 hot water systems (instantaneous gas or heat pumps), and 28 ceiling insulation installations. In addition, there were 126 draught sealing jobs undertaken, 21 appliance upgrades, 13 lighting upgrades, 8 external blinds, and 3 ceiling fans installed. The average upgrade cost was $4,973, with participants contributing on average $2,327. The total cost of all upgrades was $437,6681, with participants contributing $204,810 and the HEAART project contributing $233,889. – p. 5 ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Home Energy Assist - Affordable Retrofits : project documentation report/ BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: unpub. © 2019Description: 110 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Victorian Government Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) engaged the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) to deliver the Home Energy Assist Affordable Retrofits Trial (HEAART) to provide access to energy efficiency and rooftop solar to 100 low income and vulnerable Victorian households. Originally conceived as a pilot, HEAART was conducted to evaluate the scalability and impact of the delivery model proposed by DELWP and refined by BSL. Trial participants were provided with information to assist with decision making (in the form of a Scorecard assessment and advise on the different upgrade options), access to a panel of prevetted suppliers, a subsidy towards the upgrades, assistance with suppliers and access to a nointerest loan. The trial provided access to rooftop solar and energy efficiency upgrades through a co-funding model, whereby the cost of upgrades was split between the household and a contribution from the program. As a point of differentiation from other programs, the intention of the upgrade package was that it represent a significant or “deep” retrofit, i.e. have a substantial impact on the household’s energy usage and/or comfort. In practice, “deep retrofits” were interpreted to consist of multiple upgrades and/or with total costs above a minimum value. An additional design principle, to complement the co-funding approach, was that participants were supported and given agency to implement upgrades appropriate to their context, through advice and consultation based on the participants’ preferences and the outcome of a Victorian Residential Efficiency Scorecard assessment. A Final Project Report will be delivered, as well as this Project Documentation Report, with further analysis of the impact of upgrade packages, and a summary of the results and learnings of the program. – p. 5 ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Changing the landscape : a national resource to prevent violence against women and girls with disabilities / Our Watch ; Women with Disabilities Victoria

by Our Watch | Women with Disabilities Victoria.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Our Watch, 2022Description: 108 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Main Report | Summary Summary: Violence against women and girls with disabilities is a serious violation of human rights. Across every state and territory in Australia, women and girls with disabilities experience violence, abuse and neglect at much higher rates than men with disabilities or people without disabilities.2 Despite the limited data on violence against women and girls with disabilities globally, evidence demonstrates that the high rates of violence against women and girls with disabilities is a consistent pattern in many countries around the world.3 However, this violence is not inevitable – it is preventable.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
How learning continued during the COVID-19 pandemic : global lessons from initiatives to support learners and teachers / edited by Stephan Vincent-Lancrin, Cristobal Cobo Romani and Fernando Reimers (OECD) (World Bank)

by Vincent-Lancrin, Stephan [editor ] | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) | Cobo Romani, Cristobal [editor] | Reimers, Fernando [editor] | World Bank Group.

Publisher: Paris : OECD Publishing, 2022Description: 384 p. (online resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report brings together 45 of the education continuity stories that were jointly documented by the OECD, the World Bank, Harvard’s Global Education Innovation Initiative and HundrED during the first wave of school closures related to the COVID-19 pandemic. It covers a variety of different examples on how governments and non-governmental organisations quickly responded to school closures to implement a strategy for learners around the world to continue to study. While often based on the use of digital solutions, those solutions target specific solutions aimed at academic learning, socio-emotional support, teacher professional development, etc. The book covers examples from low, middle and high income countries on all continents and draws some lessons of these fast-paced responses to reimagine a post-pandemic education across the world. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Schooling during a pandemic : the experience and outcomes of schoolchildren during the first round of COVID-19 lockdowns / William Thorn and Stephan Vincent-Lancrin (OECD)

by Thorn, William | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) | Vincent-Lancrin, Stephan.

Publisher: Paris : OECD Publishing, 2021Description: 110 p. (online resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report offers an initial overview of the available information regarding the circumstances, nature and outcomes of the education of schoolchildren during the first wave of COVID-19 lockdowns of March-April 2020. Its purpose is primarily descriptive: it presents information from high quality quantitative studies on the experience of learning during this period in order to ground the examination and discussion of these issues in empirical examples. Information is presented on three interrelated topics: the nature of the educational experience during the period of lockdowns and school closures; the home environment in which education took place for the vast majority of schoolchildren; the effects on the mental health and learning outcomes for children during this period. The data come primarily from 5 countries (France, Germany, Ireland, the United Kingdom and the United States) with additional information on some aspects for 6 additional countries (Australia, Belgium (Flanders), Canada, Finland, Italy and the Netherlands). This report will be of interest to policy makers, academics, education stakeholders and anyone interested in a first international empirical analysis of the effects of the pandemic on the lives and education of schoolchildren. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The engagement of traditional owners in the economic development of northern Australia / Joint Standing Committee on Northern Australia

by Australia. Parliament. Joint Standing Committee on Northern Australia | Entsch, Warren [Chair].

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. : [Joint Standing Committee on Northern Australia], 2022Publisher: © Commonwealth of AustraliaDescription: xx, 111 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The great majority of the land mass of northern Australia has been claimed or recognised under land rights or native title legislation. Land is the greatest asset for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the region. But the huge challenge today is leveraging land and sea assets for the economic and social advancement of Indigenous communities. This report examines the nature of this challenge and considers the potential for making the best use of the opportunities provided by title to land. -- page 1 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The job insecurity report / Senate Select Committee on Job Security

by Australia. Parliament. Senate Select Committee on Job Security | Sheldon, Tony [Chair].

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. : [Senate Select Committee on Job Security], 2022Publisher: © Commonwealth of AustraliaDescription: xxii, 299 p. PDF.Other title: Fourth interim report : the job insecurity report.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: 1.1There is no single definition of 'insecure and precarious work'. However, the definition employed for the Australian Council of Trade Unions' (ACTU) 2012 independent inquiry into insecure work in Australia provides an excellent starting point. 1.2 In 2012 the ACTU commissioned a panel led by the Hon Brian Howe AO, former Deputy Prime Minister of Australia, to conduct an inquiry into the extent, causes and impacts of insecure work. For the purposes of that inquiry, 'insecure work' was defined as 'that which provides workers with little social and economic security and little control over their working lives'.1 1.3 While the panel acknowledged that any worker can experience insecurity from time to time, the inquiry focussed on forms of employment considered to be 'prone to insecure work, including casual work, fixed-term contracts, seasonal work, contracting and labour hire'. It also looked at part-time work, which is not always insecure, but can be.2 The 'indicators of insecure work' utilised by the panel for the independent inquiry were: (i) unpredictable, fluctuating pay; (ii) inferior rights and entitlements, including limited or no access to paid leave; (iii) irregular and unpredictable working hours, or working hours that, although regular, are too long or too few and/or nonsocial or fragmented; (iv) lack of security and/or uncertainty over the length of the job; and (v) lack of voice at work on wages, conditions and work organisation.3 1.4 This report draws on the above definition, while acknowledging that submitters and witnesses who participated in the inquiry may have defined insecure work in other ways. – p. 1 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Tracking progress against the Implementation Plan goals for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 / AIHW

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2021Description: [92 p.] PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Website Summary: This web report is a data visualisation tool for tracking progress against the 20 Implementation Plan goals for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023. It presents data for each of the 20 goals, and assesses progress against the goals at the national level.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
National Advisory Council on Poverty / Employment and Social Development Canada

by Canada. Employment and Social Development Canada | National Advisory Council on Poverty (Advisory Council).

Publisher: [Gatineau, Quebec] : [Employment and Social Development Canada], 2021-Description: pp. ill.. (Online Resource).Other title: Reports ­ - National Advisory Council on Poverty.Online Access: Building Understanding : the First Report of the National Advisory Council on Poverty (2020) | Understanding Systems : the 2021 Report of the National Advisory Council on Poverty (202) | Website Summary: In August 2018, the Government of Canada announced Opportunity for All – Canada’s First Poverty Reduction Strategy. The Strategy included a commitment to the UN Sustainable Development Goal’s target of reducing poverty by 20% by 2020 and 50% by 2030. Opportunity for All included the adoption of the Market Basket Measure (MBM) as Canada’s Official Poverty Line and the creation of the National Advisory Council on Poverty (Council) to report on progress made toward the poverty reduction targets. It continues Canada’s discussion on poverty by bringing forward the voices of individuals with lived expertise of poverty. It details progress toward our poverty targets and recommends improvements to our poverty reduction efforts Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The unequal pandemic : COVID-19 and health inequalities / Clare Bambra, Julia Lynch, Katherine E. Smith ; with a foreword by Professor Kate Pickett.

by Bambra, C. (Clare) [author.] | Lynch, Julia, 1970- [author.] | Smith, Katherine E [author.].

Edition: 1st.Publisher: Bristol : Policy Press, 2021Description: xiv, 183 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website [PDF available on website] Notes: Back Cover.Summary: This accessible, yet authoritative book shows how the pandemic is a syndemic of disease and inequality. Drawing on international data and accounts, it argues that these inequalities are a political choice and we need to learn quickly to prevent growing inequality and to reduce health inequalities in the future.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Common Ground Housing Model Practice Manual / Tom Alves, Nicola Brackertz, Christian Roggenbuck et al. (AHURI)

by Alves, Tom | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Brackertz, Nicola | Roggenbuck, Christian et al | MGS Architects | Mind Australia.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2021; © Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute Limited Description: v, 52 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Authors: Tom Alves, Nicola Brackertz, Christian Roggenbuck, Laura Hayes, Rob McGauran, Katherine Sundermann, Natalie Kyneton Bibliography : p. 47-49Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Mapping Disability Research in Australia 2018-2020 / Jennifer Smith-Merry, Gisselle Gallego, Ivy Yen et al. (Centre for Disability Research and Policy)

by Smith-Merry, Jennifer [Author.] | Gallego, Gisselle [Author.] | Yen, Ivy [Author.] | University of Sydney. Centre for Disability Research and Policy.

Publisher: Camperdown : Centre for Disability Research & Policy, The University of Sydney. 2021Description: 96 : ill p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF This mapping report provides a comprehensive picture of the current state of disability research in Australia in the period since the Audit of Disability Research Update Report was published in 2017. We conducted a systematic search of journal articles, book chapters and reports to identify Australian disability research published over the 2018-2020 period. We identified 1241 journal articles and book chapters and 225 publicly available reports produced over the 2018-2020 period. We undertook a deeper, narrative analysis on key topics. These topics were chosen because they built on the categories used in the original audit reports (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People with disability, policy and secondary use of data), along with areas raised by our consortium as important for understanding the breadth of disability research in Australia (people with disability from culturally and linguistically diverse communities, children and young people, rights-based approaches, and co-research and inclusive research). We also added in an in-depth analysis of funding cited in papers.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Not so universal : how to reduce out-of-pocket healthcare payments / Stephen Duckett, Anika Stobart, and Linda Lin (GI)

by Duckett, Stephen | Grattan Institute | Stobart, Anika | Lin, Linda.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2022Description: 58 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Website (incl chart data) Summary: Australia’s universal health insurance scheme, Medicare, is designed to make healthcare available to all, no matter how wealthy or poor. And mostly, it achieves this goal. Public hospital care is free, and the vast majority of services outside of hospital are ‘bulk-billed’ – meaning the patient pays nothing out-of-pocket. But Medicare is not perfect. Australia still relies more heavily on patients contributing to the cost of their care, compared to similar countries. In 2019-20, Australians spent a total of nearly $7 billion on out-of-hospital medical services and on medications listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). Many Australians can’t afford needed care. In 2020-21, nearly half a million Australians missed out on seeing a specialist because of cost, and more than half a million deferred or did not fill a prescription because of cost. The people who need the most healthcare – the poor and the chronically ill – miss out on care most. This is bad for those individuals, but also bad for taxpayers and the economy. It makes people sicker, widens inequities, and puts further strain on the health system down the track. This report identifies which out-of-hospital services are putting a financial strain on Australians, and what should be done to bring out-of-pocket payments down, so that fewer Australians miss out on care because of cost. [Overview] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
'What works' to sustain Indigenous tenancies in Australia / Megan Moskos ; Linda Isherwood ; Michael Dockery et al. (AHURI)

by Moskos, Megan | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Isherwood, Linda | Dockery, Michael et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2022Description: viii, 125 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This research examines the characteristics of successful tenancies for Indigenous people to understand ‘what works’ for securing successful housing outcomes. It explores the successful initiatives in sustaining tenancies for Indigenous people and what particular elements contribute to this success, including for different types of housing—private and social housing, and across different locations—urban, rural and remote. Indigenous Australians face considerable barriers to achieving successful housing outcomes. Only around a third of Indigenous Australians own their own home, compared to two-thirds of non-Indigenous people. Consequently, a far greater proportion of Indigenous people (around 60%) live in rental accommodation than non-Indigenous people (30%). Indigenous households are particularly over-represented in the social housing sector due to difficulties experienced in accessing private rental accommodation. These difficulties include racial discrimination within the private rental market; challenges meeting criteria for properties; and lack of appropriate and good quality housing. The research identifies several barriers to the delivery of tenancy support programs, including a lack of cultural understanding and the provision of culturally inappropriate services.[Website].Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to Inquiry into Renewable Energy in Victoria / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Sullivan, Damian.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 7 p. PDF.Other title: [Submission to] Legislative Council Environment and Planning Committee Parliament of Victoria.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: It is crucial that Victoria and Australia transition to 100% renewables in keeping with the Paris Agreement. Warming above 1.5 °C presents unacceptable risks to Victoria and Australia, such as more frequent and intense droughts, bushfires and heatwaves. Many of these impacts of climate change will hit people facing disadvantage hardest, in part because they have limited capacity to adapt to the changes, for example because they live in poor-quality housing or have little or no insurance. Equally, Victoria’s transition to renewable energy must be socially equitable, for example by creating decent job opportunities in the communities near renewable energy developments, resourcing and implementing clear transition plans to provide ongoing work in communities affected by fossil fuel generator closures, lowering electricity prices for all, and enabling new industries that create green jobs. The transition to renewables presents a major opportunity to bring social, economic and health benefits to Victoria, but this will require careful, long-term planning from the Victorian Government. The sudden closure of Hazelwood Power Station in 2017 demonstrates the perils of leaving such decisions to the private sector, which usually do not have incentives to act in the interests of the general public. Along with job opportunities, the benefits of 100% renewables are likely to include cheaper energy for households and businesses across the state, substantially reduced pollution in the Latrobe Valley and improvements in in-home air quality as a result of removing gas cooking and heating Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
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