Brotherhood of St Laurence

Disability - employment

This list contains 35 titles

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Implications of the restructuring of employment assistance for people with psychiatric disabilities. /

by MacDonald, Helen.

Publisher: 1997Description: 6 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (2).
OEU Update /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence. Open Employment Unit.

Publisher: 2000Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Vol. 1, Issue 1, Summer 2000Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Increasing participation : employment options for young people with intellectual disabilities. /

by Charlton, Anna.

Publisher: unpub. 2000Description: 56 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: A study undertaken for the Brotherhood of St Laurence under the Ronald Henderson Research Foundation Internship Program and as a final year thesis for the Centre for Public Policy, University of Melbourne -- cover. October 2000 Includes bibliographical references (p. 56-59)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Response to interim report of the reference group on welfare reform

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2000Description: 8 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: April 2000Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence is appreciative of many aspects of the Interim Report. However we see significant gaps, problems and failings within it. Further, the questions which the Reference Group has provided to structure responses are not always suited to simple answers, either because of ambiguity of the wording or because approval is being sought for a number of elements at once.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Employment services at the Brotherhood of St Laurence /

by Macdonald, Fiona | MacDonald, Helen.

Publisher: unpub. 2001Description: 9 leaves.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: August 2001Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Open Employment Service in the North Eastern Suburbs Region

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: unpub. 2003Description: 1v.Other title: GAPCo disability services : history /.Notes: History of the Open Employment Service, The North Eastern Suburbs region to April 1991- January 1992Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Response to the DEWR discussion paper on Disability Open Employment services. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: 2005; Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2005Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
National Inquiry into Employment and Disability : submission to the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: 2005; Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2005 Includes bibliographical references (p. 12-14)Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Comments on the Exposure Draft of Employment and Related Services 2005. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2005Description: 6p.,PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2005Summary: These comments are provided in response to the Exposure Draft of Employment and Related Services released by the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations in August 2005. We have commented specifically on the Job Network (JN), the Personal Support Programme (PSP) and Disability Open Employment Services (DOES). Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Welfare reform and people with disabilities

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2005Other title: Policy commentary : .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: September 2005; Background notes re policy commentary Welfare reform and people with disabilities This policy commentary was complied by Stephen Ziguras Note re disability statistics: The figures quoted from ABS are of people 'reporting disability'. A somewhat smaller group is those who have 'specific limitations to core activities' (eg these are 3.4 m of the 3.9 m reporting disability. (data for education levels etc are reported separately for the two categories) Also for unemployment/education etc rates we have selected data relating to working age (15-64 years) people with a disability rather than rates for all-ages population. For further clarification read the intro to the ABS report, Disability, ageing and carers: Summary of findings.Summary: Aiming to increase the number of people with disabilities who are employed, the Australian Government has announced changed eligibility criteria for Disability Support Pension to exclude those who can work more than 15 hours per week.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to the Senate Community Affairs Legislation Committee : inquiry into Employment and Workplace Relations Legislation (Welfare to Work and other measures) Bill 2005 and Family and Community Services Legislation /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2005 Includes bibliographical references (p. 11)Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).
Advocacy for employment for people with disabilities in Australia. /

by Miranda, Melville.

Publisher: unpub. 2005Description: 58 p.Notes: "This study was conducted to meet the 'Professional Project' requirements for the Masters Degree in Public Advocacy and Action, Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development, Victoria University in conjunction with the Brotherhood of St Laurence."Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Personal Support Programme evaluation : interim report

by Perkins, Daniel | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2005Description: viii, 55 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography: p. 52-55 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: The aim of this study is to evaluate how well the Personal Support Programme (PSP) enables people with multiple non-vocational barriers to achieve economic and/or social outcomes. Interim findings suggest that PSP is a crucial and well-designed program for assisting some of the most disadvantaged job seekers, but that several factors reduce its effectiveness notably, inadequate funding to help clients access services such as education and counselling to overcome barriers. While PSP s recognition that some participants are unable to engage in employment-related activities before addressing personal barriers is vital, the lack of appropriate employment assistance integrated with personal support is an unfortunate limitation for those participants who feel ready to look for work.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Effects of household joblessness on subjective wellbeing. /

by Scutella, Rosanna | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Wooden, Mark.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic.Paper presented the Australian Conference of Economists, 2005 September 25-28 2005 at the University of Melbourne, Australia 2005Description: 36 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 25-28)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Walk with me : developing employment pathways for refugees with a disability /

by Gartrell, Alexandra | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Edwards, David | Graffam, Joe.

Publisher: Burwood, Vic. Deakin University 2006Description: vi, 100 p. + appendices.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index. May 2006 1 copyAvailability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Submission to the Australian Fair Pay Commission /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Anglicare Australia.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence and Anglicare Australia 2006; Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence and Anglicare Australia 2006Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2006 Includes bibliographical references (p. 11)Summary: The relationship between wage levels and employment in the short termis uncertain There are some in the community who are urging the Commission to consider reducing the real value of the minimum wage over time in an attempt to stimulate low-skilled employment. We believe that this policy response is likely to have a negligible effect on employment and will hurt low-paid workers overall. Empirical evidence from other OECD countries fails to show a clear relationship between minimum wage changes and employment, and a number of studies have found no effect or only negligible increases in employment after increases in the minimum wage (see Dowrick & Quiggin 2003; Gregg 2000; Hyslop & Stillman 2004; Lemos 2004; Stewart 2002; Watson 2004) We understand that the Australian context differs from many of the countries studied in these references, such as the US and the UK. Australia is a country with one of the highest minimum wages in the OECD. However, the results do indicate that minimum wages and employment are not necessarily inversely related. We feel that there is a need for further research examining this relationship in the Australian context. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1), BSL Archives (1).
Welfare reform? : following the 'work-first' way. /

by Carney, Terry | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Melbourne, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence and Centre for Public Policy, University of Melbourne 2007=260 2007Description: 14 p.Other title: Social policy working paper ; no. 7.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2007 Bibliography : 11-14Summary: Terry Carney examines the job-first rationale underpinning the Australian Government s 2005 06 welfare-to-work changes. He traces the move away from Australia s historic welfare settlement, describing it as a move from social security policy to labour market policy. He considers the implications of the 1 July 2006 changes for new claimants for sole parent and disability payments, who are effectively obliged to accept almost any job. Carney argues that what is new for Australia is that these work-first policies are now pursued within a deregulated industrial relations environment and without political debate about alternatives such as the investment state or the third way policies of Britain and parts of Europe.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Making it work : promoting participation of job seekers with multiple barriers through the Personal Support Programme

by Perkins, Daniel.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2007Description: 142 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy | Summary Notes: December 2007 Summary: This report presents findings of an evaluation of the Personal Support Programme (PSP) by the Brotherhood of St Laurence, Melbourne Citymission and Hanover Welfare Services. PSP, funded by the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations and delivered by non-government and private contractors, provides two years intensive case management to job seekers facing multiple personal barriers. The research found that after involvement in the program participants had somewhat higher levels of economic and social participation and less interference from barriers. Many elements of the PSP model are consistent with best practice overseas, but two serious weaknesses are the lack of integrated employment support and the severely limited funding restricting access to specialist services for participants.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2), BSL Archives (2).
Integrated support to overcome severe employment barriers : adapting the IPS approach /

by Lawlor, Jyden | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Perkins, Daniel.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2009Description: 23 p.Other title: Social Policy Working Paper ; no. 9.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2009 Bibliography : p. 20-24Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2), BSL Archives (1).
Submission to the National Advisory Council on Mental Health regarding 'daily bread, income and living with mental illness' /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2010 Bibliography : p. 8-9 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence welcomes the opportunity to contribute to the National Advisory Council on Mental Health (NACMH)?s advice to the Minister for Health and Ageing, the Hon Nicola Roxon MP, on effective and equitable policy responses to better meet the needs of people with mental illness and their families.Availability: (1)
"It is like they just don't trust us" : balancing trust and control in the provision of disability employment services /

by Nevile, Ann | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Lohmann, Rosemary.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian National University. Crawford School of Economics and Government 2011Description: xi, 80 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011 The research underlying this report was supported by an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant. Jobs Australia, ACE National and the Brotherhood of St Laurence were Industry Partners in this research and provided both financial and practical support. INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This research project provides an independent mid-term review of the new contracting arrangements introduced on 1 March 2010. In doing so, it takes up the question as to whether closer alignment to the funding arrangements used in mainstream employment services where design principles broadly derive from agency theory, allows disability employment service providers to meet the government?s goal of ?effective?tailored services that are flexible and responsive? (Australian Government, nd).Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Decent sustainable work for all in a global economy : submission to the Independent Inquiry into Insecure Work in Australia /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2011 Bibliography : p. 37-40Summary: A comprehensive reform agenda can deliver growth for Australia through a more productive and engaged labour force which better meets employer needs; increased participation and advancement in paid work for all workers; and reduced levels of social exclusion. This is sustainable growth with inclusion. The growth of casual, contract and insecure work is one outcome of long-run trends in the Australian economy. But it is not the only outcome. Our assessment shows that the labour market is also characterised by stubborn levels of workforce underutilisation, and significant levels of marginal attachment and exclusion from paid work. These trends are not short-term or cyclic effects of economic downturns such as the current GFC. Thirty years ago, the underemployment rate was only 2.6%. The present underutilisation rate (12.6%) of the labour force represents over 1.5 million Australians of working age. In addition, there are over 800,000 Australians with a disability - many of whom with the right form of assistance could gain paid employment.Availability: (1)
Presentation to the Inquiry into Workforce Participation by People with a Mental Illness / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Horn, Michael | Bowman, Dina.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2012Description: 24 p. PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Rather than seeking the proliferation of special programs and responses to the needs of people with mental health issues, our approach is to argue for effective universal services and policies that enable a decent quality of life as a starting point. For those with severe disorders and complex needs, additional services and support are required through better coordination of health, housing and employment assistance. Research clearly shows the importance of early intervention through effective assessment, health care and support to maintain employment or re-engage with work consistent with functional capabilities. A growing evidence base shows the importance of integrated approaches that combine case management and personal support, training (foundational and 'on the job' skills) and paid work experience in a supportive setting. Those who are unemployed require multiple pathways into paid work, either through mainstream open employment, transitional employment (intermediate labour market model) or supported employment (social enterprises) that meets their aspirations, capabilities and career prospects. ; VICTORIA. Parliament. Joint Investigatory Committee. Family and Community Development. Inquiry into Workforce Participation by People with a Mental IllnessAvailability: (1)
Submission to Australian Human Rights Commission : Willing to Work : National Inquiry into Employment Discrimination against Older Australians and Australian with a Disability

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Bowman, Dina | Kimberley, Helen.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2015Description: 19 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: December 2015Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) welcomes the Australian Human Rights Commission National Inquiry into Employment Discrimination against Older Australians and Australians with Disability and is pleased to make a submission to the Inquiry. Our submission focuses on matureage workers and jobseekers. The submission considers questions raised in the Issues Paper that most closely relate to the BSL’s research and practical experience, specifically: 1 What policies, workplace practices, programs or incentives assist with increasing participation of older workers? How adequate are these policies, practices or incentives? What is the role of Government, peak business and employee groups, and individual employers? 3 What other data or information is available on employment discrimination against older workers? 7 What are the distinct challenges faced by certain groups of older Australians (e.g. women, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds or LGBTI people) in relation to employment discrimination? The submission has the following structure: • Part 2 provides an overview of the labour market situation of mature-age Australians, highlighting the rising number of mature-age jobseekers on Newstart Allowance, the high rates of long-term unemployment and underemployment and the associated consequences. • Part 3 considers the nature and extent of employment discrimination against older Australians, and how ageism is experienced differently by different groups of older workers depending on their gender and occupation. • Part 4 provides an analysis of the role of recruitment agencies and employment services as labour market intermediaries between employers and older workers. The submission calls for Government policies on ageing and employment to be refocused on addressing the prevalence of long term unemployment among mature-age adults who are still many years from reaching the (current) pension eligibility age. This includes developing robust policy frameworks to combat the pervasiveness of ageism in the labour market and to address the systematic barriers to accessing recruitment and employment services experienced by older adults. Availability: (1)
Submission to the Education Council Review of Senior Secondary Pathways

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 32 p. PDF.Other title: Submission to the COAG Education Council Review of Senior Secondary Pathways.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: December 2019Summary: This submission draws on the Brotherhood’s deep understanding of the supports and conditions that young Australians need to navigate the transition from school to work. We have a long history of research and evaluations into the related issues of work, vocational education and training, school engagement and attainment, and employer partnerships. We also have long experience in developing and delivering services for young people who, for both structural and individual reasons, struggle to make this transition. Strategic partnerships with educators, employers, industry bodies, governments and the community are key to our approach. Our submission focuses on the senior secondary pathways experiences of young people experiencing disadvantage—including those from lower income households, living in locations of disadvantage, experiencing disability, with low English language proficiency, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background. There is a stark gap in terms of school engagement, educational attainment and uptake of further and higher education between young people experiencing disadvantage and their peers. Just over 60% of young people from the lowest SES group achieve Year 12 or equivalent in contrast to almost 90% of their peers at the other end of the SES scale. While less than half of all young people go on to attend university, just a quarter of those in the lowest SES quintile do. Vocational education and training is the major gateway to skills, qualifications and employment for young people experiencing disadvantage. However, VET participation rates of equity groups are going backwards. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Councils as employers of choice : how hiring and procurement decisions can create employment for people with disability

by Mupanemunda, Maria | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2020Description: 19 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: "Working Paper"Summary: How can local governments create employment opportunities for people with disability? Across Australia, employment rates for people with disability remained unacceptably low, even before the impact of COVID-19. Local councils can help to improve this situation by reviewing how they hire staff and where they purchase goods and services. As both major employers and procurers, local governments can create jobs for people with disability either within their own organisations or across their supply chains. Good practice disability employment strategies recognise and address organisational structural and functional barriers that would inhibit people with disability from participating. Similarly, all council purchasing decisions across the procurement cycle should take into account social value – that is, the economic, social and environmental impacts on the community. Three organisational factors that drive successful social procurement and also good practice in disability employment are: • rules: to establish a supportive policy environment • resources: to enable policy compliance • relationships: to allow stakeholder collaboration (Barraket, Keast & Furneaux 2016). Leveraging local government hiring and procurement decisions can help to narrow the disability employment gap. A wider range of collaborative policy initiatives is needed, however, for meaningful progress within the larger disability employment ecosystem across Australia. This research is a product of the Bayside Regional Partnership Disability Employment Project, an initiative of the BSL NDIS Local Area Coordination Team, the BSL Research and Policy Centre and the seven local governments servicing the Bayside Peninsula Region. The project aims to support Victorian councils in becoming employers of choice for people with disability. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Purchasing with purpose : tools to develop an organisational strategy for social procurement

by Mupanemunda, Maria | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2020Description: 8 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: "Working Paper"; These tools are only two in a suite of social procurement resources. They should be read in conjunction with the discussion paper written as part of this project, titled Councils as employers of choice: how hiring and procurement decisions can create employment for people with disability, which offers useful references to other social procurement resources (Mupanemunda 2020). Summary: This resource provides two tools to help organisations plan their purchasing and procurement to achieve social benefits. These have been designed for teams or individuals who are in charge of planning organisational purchasing or procurement processes and decisions: • a framework to assess the organisation’s progress towards strategic procurement • a checklist and action list for each phase in developing a social procurement strategy. The Steps towards Social Procurement framework is a four-stage model to help organisations assess their progress towards strategic procurement. It is based on Telgen, Harland and Knight’s model (2007) of seven stages towards strategic procurement and modified to reflect Australia’s advanced procurement legal and policy context The checklists and action lists provide a systematic approach for each phase in developing a social procurement strategy. They draw on advice for creating social value across local government supply chains as identified in Social procurement: a guide for Victorian local government (Department of Planning and Community Development 2010) and Beyond value for money in procurement – social procurement in Victorian local government (Department of Environment & Municipal Association of Victoria 2017). This research is a product of the Bayside Regional Partnership Disability Employment Project, an initiative of the BSL NDIS Local Area Coordination Team, the BSL Research and Policy Centre and the seven local governments servicing the Bayside Peninsula Region. The project aims to support Victorian councils in becoming employers of choice for people with disability. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
National Disability Employment Strategy : submission to the Department of Social Services / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 17 p. PDF.Other title: BSL submission to the Department of Social Services re National Disability Employment Strategy .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) is pleased to contribute to the consultation into the development of the National Disability Employment Strategy (NDES). The BSL has outlined key recommendations in this submission for the development of the NDES that promote best practice disability employment policy. These practices are informed by: • academic literature • BSL’s expertise in employment-related research conducted with jobseekers, employers, and services providers • BSL’s experience as a service provider for people with disability with expertise in the development, delivery, and evaluation of active labour market programs. We would be delighted to work closely with the Department of Social Services (DSS) to further inform the development of the NDES. Principles for NDES success 1. Adopt ‘decent work’ as the NDES vision. 2. Integrate the NDES with broader government economic development initiatives. 3. Adopt a mainstream approach to disability employment. 4. Set ambitious employment goals and robust evaluation mechanisms. 5. Address overlapping priority areas. 6. Address ownership of actions. Lifting employer engagement, capability and demand 7. Promote employer-focused policy that creates an enabling environment. 8. Use social procurement policies and position government as champions of disability employers. 9. Adopt further ‘demand-side’ and ‘bridging’ labour market interventions. Building employment skills, experience, and confidence of young people with disability 10. Ensure alignment of education services with the NDES. 11. Improve access to VET for people with disability. 12. Link transition planning with future skills. 13. Align the Transition to Work model with the Ticket to Work model of disability employment. Improving systems and services for jobseekers and employers 14. Address the disconnect between the NDIS and DES systems. 15. Improve collaboration and knowledge-sharing across government agencies as well as the disability employment sector. 16. Foster networks and collaboration in the disability employment ecosystem. Changing community attitudes 17. Mandate disability awareness training in government and tertiary qualifications for relevant sectors. 18. Adopt awareness-raising policy measures in Article 8 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). 19. Mobilise community resources and networks. Towards a place-based approach 20. Leverage ‘local to national’ approaches to disability unemployment. [Summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Dead ends : how our social security system is failing people with partial capacity to work / Karen Soldatic, Dina Bowman, Maria Mupanemunda & Patrick McGee (BSL)

by Soldatic, Karen | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Bowman, Dina | Mupanemunda, Maria | McGee, Patrick | University of Western Sydney | Australian Federation of Disability Organisations (AFDO).

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 32 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Abstract: Almost one-third of JobSeeker Payment recipients are people assessed as unable to work more than 15 hours a week. They face an uncertain future, with inadequate income support and little prospect of gaining employment in a competitive labour market. At a glance: The growing group of people on JobSeeker Payment who are deemed to have ‘partial capacity to work’ reflects a decade of changes to tighten eligibility and assessment for social security payments, especially the Disability Support Pension. The impact on many people with disability and/or chronic health conditions has been severe. Enabling economic security for these vulnerable people requires reforms across intersecting areas including the social safety net and employment assistance. Dive deeper: The partial capacity to work category illustrates how the social security system fails many vulnerable individuals, due to design faults that create poverty traps. This report examines the development of this classification and its impact on the lives of individuals and their households. It considers the onerous processes involved in applying and for the Disability Support Pension, and the economic and social costs of having to live instead on the much lower JobSeeker Payment with extra obligations. It also points to structural barriers facing people with disability and/or chronic health conditions in seeking employment. It recommends urgent policy changes in intersecting systems – especially social security and employment assistance – to enable people who cannot work full-time due to disability or ill health to gain economic security and live with dignity. This research was supported through a generous donation to BSL from ANZ. The authors of the report are from Western Sydney University (Karen Soldatic); BSL (Dina Bowman and Maria Mupanemunda); and the Australian Federation of Disability Organisations (AFDO) (Patrick McGee). Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
10 strategies for improving employment outcomes for people with disability / Andrew Thies, Deborah Warr, Shelley Mallett and Diane Brown (RPC)

by Thies, Andrew | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Warr, Deborah | Mallett, Shelley | Brown, Diane.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 30 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: At a glance: We identify 10 intersecting strategies that will drive systemic change to improve employment outcomes for people with disability in employment. Dive deeper: The next two years are critical for improving employment outcomes for people with disability, as government is overhauling multi-billion dollar employment systems. In addition, the economic aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and structural changes to Australia’s labour market will put extra pressure on jobseekers facing disadvantage, including people with disability. In this report we build on evidence examined by the Brotherhood St. Laurence (BSL) in collaboration with the Disability and Health Unit at the University of Melbourne and BSL’s long experience in developing, delivering and evaluating labour market programs for people vulnerable to economic and social exclusion. The report offers a blueprint to guide government reforms to multiple systems that shape the employment opportunities of people with disability. The 10 strategies are: 1. Shift community attitudes towards people with disability 2. Develop national goals and evaluation mechanisms to track progress 3. Create agile funding structures and mechanisms that support person-centred employment policy 4. Implement an expansive stewardship role for government 5. Adopt a place-centred approach to employment while enabling wider opportunities 6. Design policies that promote mainstream employment 7. Integrate complementary social supports into employment programs for young people with disability 8. Use customised approaches to employment placement and support for both employers and employees 9. Support interagency collaboration 10. Promote the sustainability of the disability support workforce through ongoing training and enhancing job security These are not exhaustive of strategies that could support people with disability to thrive in employment. They should be understood as a web of interacting initiatives. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Environmental scan part 1 : current research and evaluation to promote economic participation of people with disability / Diane Brown and Shelley Mallett (BSL)

by Brown, Diane | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 102 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Environmental Scan Part 1 (Research Report) | Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability Project [Website] Notes: Environmental Scan part 1 and Environment Scan Part 2 are linked to the Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability project. To learn more about the project click the website link. Summary: This report details findings from Part 1 of a two-part Environmental Scan of current practice of employment interventions and research for people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability. The Environmental Scan includes: 1. A desktop scan of current and recent Australian research; and current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally (2015-2021 inclusive) 2. Interviews and focus groups with experts in the disability employment policy and program field (presented in a second report, Environmental Scan Part 2: Views of experts in the field on effective employment interventions for people with a disability). This Environmental Scan is one component of a broader project commissioned by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) designed to examine the scope and evidence for different interventions that improve the economic participation and employment of people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disabilities. The project will help provide the NDIA with the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of different employment interventions. Alongside the Environmental Scan, the full project also includes a Systematic Review, including a review of the theoretical evidence (see Systematic Review Technical Report, and Summary Report). Scope of the Environmental Scan Part 1 Part 1 of the Environmental Scan set out to map the current landscape of research and interventions aimed at promoting economic participation of people with a disability (with a focus on the three target populations) and identify promising areas of practice or innovation. This report addresses two of the three questions proposed by the NDIA for the Environmental Scan: 1. What research aimed at improving employment participation of people with either autism, intellectual disability or psychosocial disability is currently underway? 2. What are the applicable current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally? Part 1 of the Environmental Scan is primarily descriptive with some limited analysis of the quality of intervention (using meta-evaluation) and identification of gaps and indicators of innovation. -- p. 3 ; ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Environmental scan part 2 : views of experts on effective employment interventions for people with disability / Shelley Mallett, Diane Brown and James Finnis (BSL)

by Mallett, Shelley | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Brown, Diane | Finnis, James.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 26 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Environmental Scan Part 2 (Research Report) | Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability Project [Website] Notes: Environmental Scan part 1 and Environment Scan Part 2 are linked to the Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability project. To learn more about the project click the website link. Summary: This report details findings from Part 2 of an Environmental Scan of current practice of employment interventions and research for people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability. The Environmental Scan includes: 1. A desktop scan of current and recent Australian research; and current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally (2015-2021 inclusive) (Environmental Scan Part 1: desktop review of current research and interventions to promote economic participation of people with a disability). 2. Interviews and focus groups with experts in the disability employment policy and program field (presented in this report). This Environmental Scan is one component of a broader project commissioned by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) designed to examine the scope and evidence for different interventions that improve the economic participation and employment of people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disabilities. The project will help provide the NDIA with the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of different employment interventions. Alongside the Environmental Scan, the full project also includes a Systematic Review, including a review of the theoretical evidence (see Systematic Review Technical Report and Summary Report). Scope of the Environmental Scan Part 2: This report addresses the third question proposed by the NDIA for the Environmental Scan: what are the views of experts in the field on effective employment interventions for people with a disability (with a focus on people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability)? The report details findings from a series of focus groups and interviews with academics and senior government and non-government executives who hold deep expertise in disability employment policy and programs. Interviews and focus groups were conducted over a one-month period at the end of 2020. Participating experts were invited to provide insight into the critical aspects of effective employment programs and practices based on their knowledge and experience. Focus group and interview discussions centred around three key sub-questions in relation to the disability employment intervention field: What is working? ; What is not working? ; What is missing? ; ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Local Area Coordination Practice Framework / Brotherhood of St Laurence. NDIS Services

by Brotherhood of St Laurence. NDIS Services.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: v, 38 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Local Area Coordination Practice Framework has been developed by Brotherhood of St Laurence NDIS Services and is based on: consultations with people with disability and their families; consultation with, and knowledge of, BSL’s own workforce; international and historical local practice, research and evaluation; and published NDIS resources. The purpose of the Framework is: to act as a practical resource for Local Area Coordinators; to support a consistent, principles-based approach to practice across all BSL NDIS Services regions and teams; to deliver great services to people with disability, their families and the communities we serve; to broaden understanding of the Local Area Coordination approach at BSL; and to contribute to the ongoing development of Local Area Coordination in Australia. As a Partner in the Community, BSL works alongside and supports people regardless of their eligibility for NDIS-funded supports. Any reference in the Framework to supporting people in the NDIS or their ‘NDIS journey’ also includes people who are not eligible for NDIS-funded supports. ; TABLE OF CONTENTS: Acknowledgement of Country ii -- Acknowledgements iv -- Acronyms iv -- Welcome – A Message from Our Director v -- ABOUT THIS PRACTICE FRAMEWORK 1 -- About BSL NDIS Services 2 -- SECTION 1: BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 3 : History of Local Area Coordination 4 -- Local Area Coordination Model of Practice 4 -- The evidence base 5 -- Local Area Coordination under the NDIS 6 -- SECTION 2: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 8 : Local Area Coordination principles 9 -- Local Area Coordination principles in everyday practice 11 --- Local Area Coordination practices 12 -- Applying Local Area Coordination key principles to practices 14 -- SECTION 3: EMBEDDING THE FRAMEWORK 30 -- Embedding the Local Area Coordination principles-based approach to practice 31 -- SECTION 4: SERVICE OUTCOMES, PERFORMANCE AND MEASUREMENT 33 -- Evaluating and monitoring the impact of Local Area Coordination 34 -- NDIA expected outcomes of Local Area Coordination 34 -- Measuring Local Area Coordination outcomes for the NDIA 35 -- BSL Key Performance Indicators 35 --Regular independent evaluation 36 -- The power of stories 36 -- List of References 37 -- Useful websites 37Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission re the New Disability Employment Service Model / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley | Thies, Andrew.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 14 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) is pleased to contribute to the consultation into the development of the new Disability Employment Services (DES) model. We have outlined in this submission key recommendations for the development of DES that promote best practice disability employment policy. These practices are informed by: the experience of BSL’s NDIS participants in the Pathways to Employment (P2E) project ; the experience of BSL’s Local Area Coordination (LAC) staff who have interacted with the DES program, either through referring NDIS participants or having previously worked with DES providers ; BSL’s expertise in employment-related research, program delivery and systems change work of the National Youth Employment Body (NYEB) (BSL 2022b) conducted with jobseekers, employers and services providers ; academic literature. System level recommendations 1. Adopt a clear, person-centred vision for DES focused on access to and attainment of decent work 2. Improve connections and alignment between systems through governance mechanisms 3. Invest in more demand-side policy interventions 4. Commission to encourage collaboration, not competition Policy level recommendations 5. Expand access and eligibility for DES to all people with disability 6. Co-design adaptive employment policy with employers 7. Redefine mutual obligations as mutual accountabilities Program level recommendations 8. Develop program models that provide more training and upskilling opportunities 9. Define and measure success in conjunction with participants 10. Embed feedback mechanisms into DES for real choice and control for participants – p.3 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to the Disability Royal Commission on Australian Disability Enterprises (ADEs) / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley | Thies, Andrew | Wakeford, Michelle.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 12 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: We recommend the Commonwealth Government transition from supporting employment of people with disability in Australian Disability Enterprises (ADEs) towards supporting open employment. Open employment offers better scope than ADEs to promote the social and economic inclusion of people with disability because it pays decent wages, offers more upskilling and career development opportunities, and is aligned with person-centred approaches and interventions that build the capabilities of people with disability as well as employers. We further recommend the Commonwealth Government adopt a systemic approach to supporting the transition towards open employment of people with disability. A systemic approach would require the Government to: • diversify its policy toolkit, including by adopting more demand-side approaches to employment of people with disability • promote best-practice employment policy by funding and commissioning open employment services and supports • build the capabilities of government agencies, employers, and employment service providers to support open employment • tackle negative attitudes towards people with disability by adopting a presumption that all people with disability are able to work in open employment settings [summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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