Brotherhood of St Laurence

Homelessness

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Case management : inclusive community practice / edited by Elizabeth Moore.

by Moore Elizabeth, 1951- [editor.].

Edition: Second edition.Publisher: South Melbourne, Victoria Oxford University Press, 2016Description: xxiii, 508 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.Notes: Includes index.Summary: Case Management: Inclusive Community Practice is a consumer-directed social work text that provides health and human services workers with the theory, knowledge and skills to help the vulnerable. The second edition offers a strong in-depth overview of case management using case studies and reflective questions to teach readers to relate theory to practical situations.Clear navigation and updated content make Case Management a learning resource for students and practitioners working across the human services sector.Features of this edition:New references and content included in key areas to reflect recent changes to community practice:Chapter 6: Cultural Diversity and Competence: A Culturally Responsive Approach Chapter 18: Case management in Child Protection: Challenges, Complexities and Possibilities Chapter 19: Case Management and Complexity: Challenges in the National Disability Insurance Scheme Chapter 20: Our Safe Place - Community Responses to Koori Youth Violence Chapter 21: New Land New Home: Working with Refugee Survivors of Torture and Trauma (result of feedback)Chapter 22: Case management, Research Evidence, and Homelessness Services Well-respected Australian author team share their expertise across the many disciplines within the human services sector.Cross-reference margin notes added to signpost key topics across chapters.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Royal Commission into Victoria's Mental Health System : final report [Website] / Royal Commission into Victoria's Mental Health System.

by Victoria. Royal Commission into Victoria's Mental Health System.

Publisher: [Melbourne, Victoria] : Royal Commission into Victoria's Mental Health System, 2021Description: Online resource.Online Access: Final report (Website) | Final report summary and recommendations | Volume 1 A new approach to mental health and wellbeing in Victoria | Volume 2 Collaboration to support good mental health and wellbeing | Volume 3 Promoting inclusion and addressing inequities | Volume 4 The fundamentals for enduring reform | Volume 5 Transforming the system— innovation and implementation Summary: This is the final report of the Royal Commission into Victoria’s Mental Health System. It builds on the Commission’s interim report and articulates a vision for a reimagined system that will support the mental health and wellbeing of Victorians for generations to come. The recommended reforms aim to rebalance the current system so that most services are delivered in the community close to where people live, work and study. A focus on preventing mental illness and promoting good mental health and wellbeing will be central to the redesign of the system, reducing reliance on services alone. When people do need the support of services, most will receive the treatment, care and support they need through community-based services. Hospitals will respond to the needs of people who require highly specialised or acute care, and residential services will support people who need longer periods of rehabilitation following a period of mental illness or psychological distress. Building on the recommendations made in the Commission’s interim report, the reforms outlined in this report will ensure the mental health and wellbeing system responds to the needs of Aboriginal people. It will support the principles of self-determination, with Aboriginal social and emotional wellbeing services designed and led by Aboriginal communities. In the new system, services will be comprehensive and holistic and will integrate mental health and wellbeing services with other supports for living well. Two aligned systems, one for infants, children and young people and one for adults and older adults, will be streamed to respond to different developmental needs and stages of life. Reflecting the strong and vibrant diversity of Victoria’s population, the system will respond to the needs of individuals, families, carers and supporters from Victoria’s diverse social cohorts and communities. New leadership will ensure people with lived experience of mental illness or psychological distress, families, carers and supporters have an authentic and valued role in the ongoing development of the system and the delivery of services. New governance arrangements will ensure greater accountability back to people and communities. The historically overlooked and de-prioritised mental health system will be a relic of the past. The Commission’s processes to design the future mental health and wellbeing system have been rigorous and considered. The future system presented in this report has been shaped by the contributions of thousands of Victorians, including those with lived experience of mental illness or psychological distress, families, carers and supporters, people from diverse communities, mental health workers, researchers, service providers and others. Their contributions were broad and covered a wide range of experiences of all parts of the mental health system and those systems that intersect with it such as the education, criminal justice system and the homelessness and housing systems. The deep knowledge of people who have experience of Victoria’s mental health system has been complemented by the advice and expertise of people in other Australian jurisdictions, and from around the world. A wide array of research and data has further enriched the Commission’s understanding and has ensured the system of the future has been designed on the best available evidence. Chapter 39: The work of the Commission outlines how the Commission undertook its task. The knowledge and evidence from these diverse sources underpin every topic in this final report. The report is a companion piece to the interim report. It comprises five volumes. This introduction provides an overview of the full report and is followed by an introduction to the first volume, A new approach to mental health and wellbeing in Victoria. ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Housing and homelessness in Australia

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence nd. 1988Description: 4p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Housing futures and homeless children and young people /

by Carter, Jan | Brotherhood of St Laurence Social Policy and Research Centre.

Publisher: [Melbourne] [unpublished] 1988Description: 7 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Paper delivered to the Symposium on Homeless: Wednesday July -6, 1988: sponsored by the Victorian State Advisory Committee for the IYSH. Jan Carter, Director, Social Policy and Research Centre, Brotherhood of St Laurence Part time Commissioner, Human Rights and Equal Opportunities Commission - National Inquiry into Child and Youth Homelessness.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Prevention of youth homelessness, Strengthening communities for young people

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence 1990Description: Electronic.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Leaving care and homelessness /

by Taylor, Janet | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St. Laurence 1990Description: 106 p. Bibliography: p. 77-106.Other title: Child poverty policy review ; 5.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: "With an annotated bibliography by Ruth Harrison" -t.p.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
"Out of work, out of home" : report of the action research project : unemployment and youth homelessness : final report

by Boyce, James.

Publisher: unpub. 1991Description: 67 p. Includes bibliography.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Final report August 1991Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).
The what, why, who and how of the prevention of youth homelessness /

by Carter, Jan.

Publisher: unpub. 1991Description: 22 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Paper presented to the William Buckland Conference on the prevention of Youth Homelessness, Melbourne, June 25, 1991.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Youth Homelessness projects

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) [1992]Description: PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project: interim project description. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1992Description: 17 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: 'December 1, 1992'.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Targeting the homeless /

Publisher: [n.p.] IMPACT 1992Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Outlines the Linked Access Employment Training Project which is financially supported by the Body Shop and run by the Brotherhood of St Laurence. Refer also to Helen MacDonald's evaluation of the project.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
The Brotherhood of St Laurence's Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1993Description: [9] leaves.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
The Brotherhood of St Laurence's Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project : progress report 1. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1993Description: 15 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: '30 December 1993' 2 copiesAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Prevention of youth homelessness project : progress report 2. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1993Description: 9 p. + attachments.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: 'December 1993'Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Prevention of youth homelessness action research. /

by Robson, Belinda | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1993Description: 2 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Paper given at the Dandenong TAFE Forum 'Family and Youth Forum Joint Action Projects', 17 September 1993Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Poverty issues: youth homelessness /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence 1993Description: 7p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Poverty issues series consists of Poverty today, Youth homelessness, UnemploymentAvailability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Prevention of youth homelessness : strengthening communities for young people. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: 1993Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: The following is a summary of some of the factors impacting on young people and their families in the 1990s. It outlines the social and economic context in which the Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project will operate, and demonstrates the need for such a project. 2 c. (C 2. missing stocktake 1997)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Poverty facts: housing & homelessness

by [Brotherhood of St Laurence].

Publisher: Fitzroy Brotherhood of St Laurence 1993 -Description: pp.Online Access: December 1993 | May 1995 Notes: Fact sheets compiled for secondary studentsAvailability: Items available for reference: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Youth homelessness : courage and hope / edited by Helen Sykes.

by Sykes, Helen (ed.) (Helen Lesley) | Sykes, Helen.

Publisher: Carlton, Vic. : Melbourne University Press, 1993Description: xiv, 160 p. : ill.Notes: Forward by Peter Hollingworth, Archbishop of Brisbane - p. v ; Jan Carter : Jan Carter is Professor and Head of the Department of Social at The University of Melbourne. She was previously Director of the Social Policy and Research Centre of the Brotherhood of St Laurence. - p. xii Peter Hollingworth : Peter Hollingworth in the Anglican Archbishop of Brisbane. He previously worked with the Brotherhood of St Laurence, for the last years as Executive Director. Archbishop Hollingworth has been an outspoken commentator and critic on social justice issues. He has written extensively and made contributions to numerous committees on these issues. He has written extensively and made contributions to numerous committees on these issues.; Jan Carter: The School, Youth Homelessness and the Future, 129-144 pp.Summary: Youth Homelessness tells the moving stories of homeless young people and of people who have tried to help them. It is about the courage homeless young people show in the face of persistent neglect and abuse. It is also about the hope that can be given to them when there are committed and caring people in schools to look after them, when school programs are specially designed for them, and when support is forthcoming from the outside community.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Poverty issues: unemployment /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence 1993Description: 4p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Poverty issues series consists of Poverty today, Unemployment, Youth homelessness.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Poverty issues: poverty today /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence 1993Description: 16p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Series consists of Poverty today, Youth homelessness, Unemployment.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Attaining independence : addressing the needs of homeless young people /

by Magree, Catherine (comp.) | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Elkington, Deborah (comp.).

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1993Description: 45 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: A summary of material produced by the Brotherhood of St Laurence 1991-93Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
The prevention of youth homelessness project : enhancing project management : a report to the Brotherhood of St Laurence

by URCOT.

Publisher: 1994Description: PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: December 1994Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Prevention of youth homelessness project : progress report 3. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1994Description: 9 p. + attachments.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: 'May 1994'Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project : progress report no. 6. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1994Description: 21 + attachments.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: 'December 1994'Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project : progress report no. 5. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1994Description: 7 p. + attachments.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: 'September 1994' MISSING Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Experiences of youth homelessness in Ballarat: an inquiry into previously homeless youth /

by Johnson, Janelle | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project.

Publisher: unpub. 1994Description: 17p. + appendices.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: For the `Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project'..coverAvailability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Inquiry into aspects of youth homelessness /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: unpub. 1994; Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1994Description: 17 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Includes: Attachment 1. Magree, C. & Elkington, D.(eds) 1993. Attaining independence: addressing the needs of homeless young people. Attachment 2. Morris, H. & Blaskett, B. 1992. Learning to survive: income support for homeless secondary students, Research for Action No. 2. Attachment 3. Thomson, L. 1993. Going somewhere? Income support for homeless young people, Research for Action No. 1. Attachment 4. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1993. Prevention of youth homelessness: Project Brief. Attachment 4. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1993. Prevention of youth homelessness: interim project description.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project : strengthening communities for young people : annual report : progress report no.4. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence [1994]Description: 20 p. + attachments.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: A project funded by: The Australia Youth Foundation, The Brotherhood of St Laurence, The Queen Elizabeth ll Silver Jubilee Trust for Young Australians, The Sidney Myer Fund, The Victorian State Office of Youth Affairs, The William Buckland Foundation -- cover page.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Preliminary community action plan

by Brotherhood of St Laurence. Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1994Description: 74 p.Other title: Community Action Plan .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: July 1994 Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project strengthening communities for young people The project is funded by: Australian Youth Foundation ; Brotherhood of St Laurence ; Department of Employment Education & Training ; Sidney Myer Fund ; The Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee ; Trust for Young Australians ; Victoria State Office of Youth Affairs ; William Buckland Foundation Summary: The Community Action Plan Outlines the content of the work of the Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project. In particular, it contextualises the service delivery and research strategies currently being implemented in Dandenong and Ballarat Project staff, student, volunteer and Jobskills have contributed to this report. It is a compilation of their work.Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).
Poverty issues: a fairer share: taxation, inequality and poverty /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence 1995Description: 19p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Poverty issues series consists of Poverty today, Unemployment, Youth homelessness.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Moving on : Austudy and the lives of unsupported secondary students

by Tasker, Gillian | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1995Description: xvi, 126 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Arranged friendships : the final report on the Brotherhood of St Laurence "Family Friends" pilot program. /

by Scott, Dorothy.

Publisher: unpub. 1997Description: 24 leaves.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: July 1997 Includes references (p. 24) This is the final report in a two part evaluation of the Family Friends Program. The interim evaluation was completed in April 1996. "Family Friends" was a pilot program of the Brotherhood of St Laurence which grew out of an earlier program on homelessness among young women. Family Friends was designed to assist vulnerable young women who were in the transition to motherhood.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1), BSL Archives (1).
Strengthening attachments : the report of the Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project. /

by Charman, Mandy | Brotherhood of St Laurence | McClelland, Alison | Montague, Meg | Sully, Vincent.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St. Laurence 1997Description: xviii, 172 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: October 1997. A project supported by: The Australian Youth Foundation ; The William Buckland Foundation ; The Sidney Myer Fund ; The Queen's Trust for Young Australians ; The Victorian State Office Youth Affairs ..tp.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Strengthening attachments: how schools and community agencies can help to prevent youth homelessness /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence. Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence 1997Description: 7p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: See also: Strengthening attachments [B8502] : full report of the PYHP ; Getting it together [B8517] which describes the value of two types of programs: `Alternative Behaviours to Violence' and `Peer Mediation', carried out at Ballarat Secondary College.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Getting it together : the value of alternative behaviours to violence and peer mediation programs : making school happier and safer, and helping students at risk

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1997Description: 11 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: The Prevention of Youth Homelessness Project (PYHP) auspiced by the Brotherhood of St Laurence ran from 1992 until the end of 1996. Using action research approach, it aimed to explore ways to prevent youth homelessness in two Victorian communities of Ballarat and Dandenong. The research report arising from this proposal, `Strengthening attachments' [B8518] found that homelessness may be prevented by schools and community agencies intervening early to help young people who are at risk.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
"On becoming a more positive school". /

by McCuskey, Erin.

Publisher: unpub. [1999]?Description: 31 p. + appendices.Notes: Report on consultations undertaken for the Positive School Environment Project, August - September 1997 Includes bibliographical referencesAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Positive School Environment Project. /

by McCuskey, Erin.

Publisher: unpub. [1999]?Description: 47 p. + appendices.Notes: Includes bibliographical references The report on an innovative project undertaken by Ballarat Secondary College East Campus in 1997/98.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The compassionate eye : research and reform /

by Davision, Graeme.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Ecumenical Housing Inc. ; UnitingCare Connections 2000Description: 35 p. PDF.Other title: Oswald Barnett oration | F. Oswald Barnett oration ; 7.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: F. OSWALD BARNETT ORATION Taken from the F. Oswald Barnett oration delivered at St Johns, Southgate, Tuesday 24 October 2000; "Response" by Tony Nicholson, p. 31-35 Tony Nicholson was the former Executive Director at The Brotherhood of St Laurence for thirteen years until 2017. Previously he worked as the Chief Executive Officer at Hanover Welfare Service (now Launch Housing).Summary: Barnett’s conversion to the cause of social reform was a highly personal and emotional response to the experience of the slum. In the illuminating interview with Bill Russell from which I draw this account, Barnett is explicit about the ways in which the spectacle of the slum child awakened feelings that went back to his own childhood as the son of an unemployed Brunswick quarryman in the 1890s depression.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
State of the family report /

by Anglicare Australia.

Publisher: Reid, A.C.T. Anglicare Australia 2000 -Description: pp.Other title: Families as Carers: Families fighting: Economic state of Families (2000) | Economic and Social Exclusion (2001) | Unemployment and Poverty (2002) | Children growing up in Poverty (2003) | Missing out: Youth in Australia (2004) | What do Australian Families look like today? (2005) | Life on a low income (2006) | Creative tension: Australia's social inclusion agenda (2008) | Beyond economics: families in the forefront (2009) | In from the edge (2010) | Staying power (2011) | When there's enough to eat - 1 (2012) | Paying attention - (2013) | Being a/part (2014) | Who is being left behind? (2015) | Positions vacant? When the jobs aren't there (2016) | The meaning of home (2017) | The real story : what Australians think about poverty and how we shape the debate (2018) | Our better selves : appreciating and re-imagining our work to create change (2019).Online Access: Anglicare: State of the Family Report | 2019 Our better selves : appreciating and re-imagining our work to create change Notes: Includes bibliographical references Print copies available on library shelves: There has been Brotherhood of St Laurence contribution in the following State of the Family reports: 2003: Eileen Buckley, Manager, Craigieburn Centre Jill Webb, Manager, Child and Family Services 2005: Muktesh Chibber, Family Services Team leader at the Ecumenical Migration Centre (EMC) 2009: Michael Horn, Research and Policy Centre Responding to the economic downturn : policies for sustainable social and economic participation p. 61-72 2011: Michael Horn, Research and Policy Centre Measuring social exclusion: evidence for a new social policy agenda p. 1-23 2013: Jeff O'Hare, Chaplain BSL, was part of the publication reference group. 2016: Young and unemployd in Australia / Sally James, Farah Farouque and Diane Browne NB 2004 : "Missing out: Youith in Australia today" missing 10/2/2014Summary: Anglicare Australia has been providing valuable insights into the changing nature of families in Australia since 2000 with the annual State of the Family report.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (18).
Submission to the Commonwealth Advisory Committee on Homelessness. Response to National Homeless Strategy Consultation Paper

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2001Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2001Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence is a major Victorian-based welfare organisation with a focus on the prevention and alleviation of material poverty, the consequent hardship and lack of opportunity and the improvement of the quality of lives of people on low incomes generally. Inspired by its Christian foundation and its commitment to social justice, the Brotherhood of St Laurence is working for an Australia free of poverty. The Brotherhood of St Laurence has an interest in the supply of affordable, secure, well-located and appropriate housing for a number of reasons. Firstly, access to housing is fundamental to the organisation’s vision of an Australia free of poverty. Secondly, the Brotherhood is a provider of residential and community based aged care and independent living units for low-income elderly and a provider of state based Public Housing Advocacy Program (previously the Rental Housing Support Program). Thirdly, the current lack of affordable housing puts pressure on all other Brotherhood services including our employment services, in particular Community Support Program and Job Placements Education and Training (JPET); our community services; and the settlement services provided by the Ecumenical Migration Centre. Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Poverty and inequality in Australia

by Australian Council of Social Service.

Publisher: Strawberry Hills, NSW : Australian Council of Social Service, 2001Description: 38 p.Other title: Research compendium : poverty and inequality in Australia .Notes: October 2001 Contains abstracts of past research done by Brotherhood staff.Summary: The aim of this compendium, released for the ACOSS National Congress, is to provide researchers, practitioners, and social policy analysts with brief abstracts of current research into poverty and inequality in Australia.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Home. [videorecording] /

by Sykes, Amanda | Brogan, Brett.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Soundfilm Melbourne 2004Description: 1 videodiscs (DVD) ( 31 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.Notes: Funded by: Myer Foundation, Brotherhood of St Laurence, Melbourne Fringe Festival, VicHealth, Helen Macpherson Smith Trust.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Breaking cycles, building futures : promoting inclusion of vulnerable families in antenatal and universal early childhood services : a report on the first three stages of the project. /

by Carbone, Stephen | Department of Human Services | Fraser, Alex | Ramburuth, Rasika | Nelms, Lucy | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Department of Human Services 2004Description: x, 116 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Report on the first three stages of the projectSummary: The Breaking Cycles, Building Futures project is an initiative of the Victorian State Government and is funded by the Premier’s Drug Prevention Council. It is part of the State Government’s Best Start Strategy. The project’s key aim is to identify, implement and evaluate strategies to promote more inclusive antenatal and universal early childhood services, which better engage and assist vulnerable families. The Brotherhood of St Laurence was contracted by the Department of Human Services to undertake this project. In its mission of working for an Australia free of poverty, the Brotherhood of St Laurence acknowledges the importance of efforts to better support vulnerable children and their parents, not only as an important immediate measure, but also as a strategy to prevent poverty and social exclusion in the future. The Breaking Cycles, Building Futures project is being undertaken in four stages: • a literature review • consultation with parents, service providers and peak bodies • documenting possible strategies which Best Start partnerships can adopt to help them to provide more inclusive services • working with Best Start partnerships to implement and evaluate these strategies. This document reports on the results of the first three stages and outlines the process for addressing the final stage. The study started from the assumption that antenatal and universal early childhood services (Maternal and Child Health services, kindergartens and primary schools) are an important resource for promoting the wellbeing of our children and their families. As such, it is imperative these services are available to all. The study focused on answering four key questions: • What is an inclusive service? • How inclusive are existing antenatal and universal early childhood services? • What are the barriers to inclusion? • How can these services be more inclusive so that they better engage vulnerable families? Answers to these questions were sought through a review of the national and international literature, along with an extensive community consultation process. In all, 69 parents, more than 100 service providers and more than 20 Victorian Government staff were interviewed. The vast majority of parents interviewed were experiencing a range of (often concurrent) difficulties in their lives, such as low income, unemployment, homelessness, problematic substance use, mental illness or a disability. Many were young parents (less than 20 years of age) and several were from a non-English speaking background. [Executive summary - extract] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
"Assisting people facing homelessness in the Personal Support Program" /

by Perkins, Daniel.

Publisher: 2006Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Research providing some insight into the needs and attitudes of PSP participants experiencing homelessness or housing instability is presented. Data obtained from 134 PSP participants, case managers, Centrelink and DEWR staff. Author argues that a more integrated approach is needed between supporting people facing homelessness in PSP to move into employment or education and training and providing the intensive personal support they require to manage other issues such as housing instability and mental health problems.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Improving employment participation for welfare recipients facing personal barriers. /

by Perkins, Daniel.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2006Description: 15 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Paper presented by Daniel Perkins to the 39th Social Policy Association Conference, University of Birmingham, July 18-20 2006Summary: There is an increasing recognition that welfare recipients facing significant disadvantage in the labour market are not being well assisted by the conventional labour market programs. Often such job seekers struggle against an interaction of employment and educational barriers combined with a range of personal issues such as mental health problems, substance abuse, criminal records, physical health problems, homelessness, and family breakdown. While there is agreement on the need to provide additional support there is little consensus about what form this should take and whether it can be added to existing programs or requires the development of new initiatives. It is also not clear whether individuals facing personal barriers should be encouraged or required to engage in vocational activities at the same time as addressing personal barriers or whether personal barriers should be addressed prior to providing employment assistance. This paper explores the labour market outcomes for people facing severe personal barriers to employment in Australia the US and Europe. It then considers whether such people want to work, whether work is beneficial or detrimental and examines current policy responses and gaps. The final section of the paper draws primarily on US research to document program elements and models that have been successful in achieving improved employment outcomes for this group. Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
The homeless [homelessness] white paper : a bold coherent strategy. /

by Nicholson, Tony.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Often referred to as the 'Homeless White Paper' at BSLAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
The road home : a national approach to reducing homelessness. /

by Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Department 2008Description: 80 p.: ill.Other title: The White Paper on Homelessness .Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Tony Nicholson [CEO of the Brotherhood of St Laurence 2004-2017] Chair of the Homelessness Steering Committee 2008Summary: "The Road Home sets the strategic agenda for reducing homelessness to 2020. Homelessness can affect anyone and reducing it is everyone's responsibility. Working together, with national leadership and towards a common goal, homelessness can be prevented. Australia's efforts to reduce homelessness have to be urgent, as well as sustained." -- FaCSIA websiteAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Education Development Project : improving educational and housing outcomes for children experiencing homelessness : final evaluation report /

by Hanover Welfare Services | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Foundation for Young Australians Education Foundation Division.

Publisher: South Melbourne, Vic. Hanover Welfare Services 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2009 A National Homelessness Strategy Demonstration ProjectSummary: Education literature has clearly established the importance of the middle years of schooling as a time where average student achievement can plateau or decline. Critically, the middle years are also consistent with the age when children and young people experiencing homelessness begin to disengage from school. Children experiencing homelessness are less likely to attend school, more likely to finish their schooling early and not as likely to progress as far educationally as other children. This in turn least to limited life choices for these children and also longer-term costs in unemployment and lost productivity to the community. The Education Development Project was a two year pilot project jointly managed by the Brotherhood of St Laurence, the Education Foundation division of the Foundation for Young Australians and Hanover Welfare Services. The central hypothesis of the project was that any improvement in educational engagement for children in the middle years of school (Years 5-9) who are experiencing homelessness requires changes in current practices in the homelessness and education sectors.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
What makes case management work for people experiencing homelessness ? : Evidence for practice. /

by Gronda, Hellene.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2009Description: ii, 151 p.: ill., tables, charts.Notes: This project was initiated by a partnership between Hanover Welfare Services, the Brotherhood of St Laurence, the St Vincent de Paul Society, the Council to Homeless Persons Victoria, and the Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI) Ltd. Summary: "Case management has been central to homelessness assistance practice in Australia since at least the early 1990s, when it was adopted as a key strategy to enhance the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP). The approach was formally documented in 1997 with the release of the SAAP Case Management Resource Kit. This research synthesis project was initiated with the intention to provide a rigorous and independent evidence base for informing practice and policy, in particular the negotiation of the next SAAP program agreement. > The research synthesis aims to provide an evidence-based understanding of how case management works to contribute to the development of more effective responses to the needs of people experiencing homelessness. This report defines case management and synthesises the international scientific evidence on case management practice for the homelessness sector." -- AbstractAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Achieving (extra)ordinary aspirations : a research project exploring the role that the Step Ahead program has played in the lives of young people affected by homelessness / Marty Grace, Deborah Keys, Aaron Hart, Bernadette Keys

by Grace, Marty | Melbourne City Mission | Keys, Deborah | Hart, Aaron | Keys, Bernadette | Victoria University.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Victoria University, 2011Description: 106 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Achieving extraordinary aspirations.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Arron Hart and Deborah Keys are currently working at the Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre.Summary: Many young people affected by homelessness are determined to continue with the usual activities pursued by those in their age group. In extraordinary circumstances, they aspire to achieve what most Australians consider to be ordinary, achievable goals – completing their education and establishing a career, relationships and a home. Such goals may be ordinary in the sense of commonplace but their achievement against all odds can be extraordinary. The Achieving (extra)ordinary aspirations research was undertaken in 2010-2011 by Victoria University and Melbourne Citymission. It focuses on the experiences of young people who have used the Melbourne Citymission Step Ahead program, reporting on the young people’s views about different aspects of the model, how they experienced it, and what made a difference in their livesAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Addressing homelessness amongst persons with a disability : identifying and enacting best practice

by Beer, Andrew | University of Adelaide | Baker, Emma | Mallett, Shelley | Batterham, Deb | Pate, Anne | Lester, Laurence | Hanover Welfare Services | Melbourne City Mission | University of Melbourne.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Australian Government, [2012]Description: 80 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: A FaHCSIA National Homelessness Research Project.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: July 2012 - front page September 2011 - page 2 "National Homelessness Research Projects" Project No. 1-EFBLTW; Professor Shelley Mallett is General Manager, Research and Policy Centre at the Brotherhood of St Laurence (also Professorial Fellow in Social Policy School of Social and Political Sciences, University of Melbourne.Summary: Persons with a disability are vulnerable both to, and within, homelessness because of their many have low incomes, may have limited engagement with the labour market, and limited housing options. While attention has been given to the relationship between poor mental health and homelessness, persons with other types of disability – physical, sensory, intellectual – are also at risk. The goal of this research is to understand the homelessness risks confronting persons with a disability and how best to meet their needs. This project addresses research priorities around improving service practice; understanding referral pathways through services; preventing homelessness through early intervention; and, identifying resilience and protective factorsAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Towards a fair and decent social security system : submission to Senate inquiry into adequacy of the allowance system for jobseekers and others / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Horn, Michael.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2012Description: 33 p. PDF.Other title: BSL submission to the Senate inquiry into the adequacy of the allowance payment system.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Current Newstart and Youth Allowance levels are insufficient to enable individuals relying on those payments to live with dignity and security. They fail to keep jobseekers and other income support recipients out of poverty. They fail to guard against social exclusion and financial vulnerability. Current payment levels fail to enable individuals to access affordable housing and protect against homelessness and may in fact undermine broader efforts to facilitate transitions into paid employment. The present Newstart Allowance (NSA) falls short of community expectations within Australia and is extremely low compared to income support of jobseekers in other developed countries. Based on these assessments we argue that the level of Newstart and Youth Allowance (YA) fails to meet any reasonable test of adequacy.Availability: (1)
Developing independence : evaluating and educational initiative for young people facing homelessness : pilots 1 and 2

by Myconos, George | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2014Description: viii,25 p. : ill.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: A study of Developing Independence, a new, tailored course to guide the learning and career planning of young people who are risk of homelessness, found that online learning needs to be combined with supportive, face-to-face interaction in order to cater for diverse needs.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Education First Youth Foyer : Practice framework

by Mallett, Shelley | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Social Policy and Research | James, Sally | McTiernan, Niamh | Buick, Jo | Hanover Welfare Services.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. South Melbourne, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence Hanover Welfare Services 2014Description: viii, 128 p. : ill. (spiral bound) PDF.Other title: Practice framework.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: June 2014 Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing) Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing: https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/ Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Education First Youth Foyer : Certificate 1 in Developing Independence Toolkit : trainers' manual and learning plan /

by Buick, Jo | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Hanover Welfare Services.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2014; South Melbourne, Vic. Hanover Welfare Services 2014Description: iv, 51 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Certificate 1 in Developing Independence Toolkit : trainers' manual and learning plan /.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: June 2014 Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing) Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/ Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Education First Youth Foyer : Certificate 1 in Developing Independence : learning plan/

by Buick, Jo | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Stearman, Debra.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2014; South Melbourne, Vic. Hanover Welfare Services 2014Description: 62 p. (spiral bound) : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: First published in June 2014 Reprinted in October 2015 Redesigned in August 2018 Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing) Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing : https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/Availability: (1)
Education First Youth Foyer : Education Offer Conceptual Framework

by Buick, Jo | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Mallett, Shelley | James, Sally | Launch Housing.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic Brotherhood of St Laurence 2014; South Melbourne, Vic. Launch Housing 2014Description: iv, 61 p.,ill (Spiral bound) PDF.Other title: Education Offer Conceptual Framework.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: First published in October 2014 Reprinted in Xxx 2016 Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing); Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing : https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/Summary: The inclusion and development of these 6 Service Offers in the EFY Foyer Model is grounded in research and practice evidence that highlights the role of these domains in facilitating young people’s successful transition to adulthood. Conceptual frameworks have been developed for each of the 6 Offers, which provide an addendum to the EFY Foyer Practice Framework.1 They detail the different components and processes of each Offer, the rationale for their development and delivery, and demonstrate how the Offers link to each other and to the broader EFY Foyer Model and the Open Talent (OT) approach currently being used in the EFY Foyers. Availability: (1)
Education First Youth Foyer : Employment Offer Conceptual Framework

by Cull, Emma | Brotherhood of St Laurence Social Policy and Research Department | Mallett, Shelley | James, Sally.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic Brotherhood of St Laurence 2014; South Melbourne, Vic. Hanover Welfare Services 2014Description: iv, 67 p.,ill (Spiral bound) PDF.Other title: Employment Offer Conceptual Framework.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: December 2014 Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing) Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/ Summary: The EFY Foyer Employment Offer presents a new approach for service-connected young people that aims to increase their access to and participation in the labour market, and address structural and personal barriers to accessing employment. The Employment Offer recognises that enabling service-connected young people to build a pathway to employment requires the development of strong links with employers, education and training services, employment support services and community service organisations. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Education First Youth Foyer : Civic Participation Offer Conceptual Framework

by Cull, Emma | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Brown, Diane | Mallett, Shelley | James, Sally | Launch Housing.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic Brotherhood of St Laurence 2015; South Melbourne, Vic. Launch Housing 2015Description: iv, 51 p.,ill (Spiral bound) PDF.Other title: Civic Participation Offer Conceptual Framework.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: September 2015 Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing) Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing : https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/Summary: The concept of civic participation is closely related to ideas about both active and social citizenship. It has been defined as ‘individual or collective actions in which people participate to improve the wellbeing of communities or society in general and which provide opportunities for reflection.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Education First Youth Foyer : Housing and Living Skills Offer Conceptual Framework

by Horn, Michael | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Cull, Emma | Mallett, Shelley | Launch Housing.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic Brotherhood of St Laurence 2015; South Melbourne, Vic. Launch Housing 2015Description: iv, 63 p.,ill (Spiral bound) PDF.Other title: Housing and Living Skills Offer Housing availability and affordability in the private rental market.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: August 2015 ; Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing : https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/Summary: The Housing and Living Skills Offer ensures that all EFY Foyer students are supported to realise their potential through the provision of safe, affordable and high-quality student housing, which they can use as a foundation for their participation in mainstream educational opportunities. This includes providing students with opportunities to gain the skills and access to the resources required for them to make a successful transition to independent living.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Throwing out the rulebook : collaborative innovation for the unfolding Education First Youth Foyer model

by Borlagdan, Joseph | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Keys, Deborah | Launch Housing.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2015; Collingwood, Vic. Launch Housing 2015Description: vii. 40 p. : ill PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing) Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing : https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/Summary: This report addresses the question: What can be learned from the collaborative effort of government, community and other organisations in the initial developmental phase of an innovative model—Education First Youth Foyers—to address homelessness among young people? It covers the initial planning and development stage of the Education First Youth Foyer (EFYF) model, from post-election funding to the opening of the first EFYF at Holmesglen TAFE. Drawing from interviews with community agency CEOs and managers, public sector managers and staff, TAFE staff and the chair of the Interagency Steering Committee, this report explains how reconfigured relationships and roles between government and community sector enabled the modification of existing practices and the creation of new approaches. Developed by the Brotherhood of St Laurence and Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing), with funding from the Victorian Government, the Victorian Education First Youth Foyers (EFY Foyers) are an innovative student accommodation and education model for young people experiencing, or at risk of, homelessness. Students participate in education and training while at EFY Foyers to gain skills to transition to independent living and employment. They also receive housing and integrated forms of support for up to two years. The EFY Foyers represent a new model and practice approach to working with young people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Departing from deficit-based welfare models, the EFYF model is designed to provide mainstream opportunities that enable and develop young people’s capabilities. It is predicated on the core assertion that educational attainment can provide a route out of disadvantage for young people experiencing homelessness.1 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Education First Youth Foyer : Social Connections Offer Conceptual Framework

by Hanson-Peterson, Jennifer | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Cull, Emma | Mallett, Shelley | James, Sally | Launch Housing.

Publisher: South Melbourne, Vic. Launch Housing 2015; Fitzroy : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2015Description: iv, 58 p. : ill. Spiral bound. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: September 2015 Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing) Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing : https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/Summary: The Social Connections Offer seeks to equip EFY Foyer students with the social and emotional knowledge, skills and opportunities to develop thriving social relationships and networks (including with family, friends, partners and services), and ultimately to have sustainable connections with helpful support and resources. The Social Connections Offer will provide resources, opportunities and support for EFY Foyers students to: 1 Develop meaningful social connections goals and aspirations and plans to achieve them 2 Engage in relevant, meaningful activities (e.g., social activities, sporting clubs, support groups, house meetings) to develop positive, supportive connections with adult facilitators and peers through the sharing of interests, thoughts, ideas and feelings 3 Access mainstream resources and supports (e.g., family mediation, counselling) relevant to their social connections’ goals 4 Develop the necessary skills to build and maintain relationships (e.g., communication skills, cooperation, conflict resolution, empathy, understanding social norms) 5 Access ongoing opportunities for social connections both in Foyer and post-Foyer. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Pathways and outcomes for young people using Specialist Homelessness Services : a research paper in support of the Education First Youth Foyer Project / Michael Horn (RPC)

by Horn, Michael | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2015Description: 51 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The evaluation seeks to compare outcomes of assistance provided to eligible young people between the three EFYF trial sites, the standard form of transitional housing with support and the 8 Step Forward services. In order to minimise selection bias effects - acknowledging that young people will have potentially differing characteristics to match entry criteria set by the three EFYFs in each region - the evaluation sampling frame needed to take into account the demographic and background characteristics of young people using the above three categories of service, as well as attributes relating to difference in selection criteria applied by each of these service types. In the case of both EFYF and for some of the Step Forward services, this includes an assessment of the young person's readiness and commitment to full participation in the activities offered by each service. -- p.8Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Social work and the city : urban themes in 21st-century social work / Charlotte Williams, editor.

by Williams, Charlotte (ed.).

Publisher: London Palgrave Macmillan, 2016Description: xv, 299 p.Notes: Includes index.Summary: This book critically explores ways of thinking about the city and its relevance for the profession of social work. It provides a colourful illustration of practice drawing on examples of social work responses to a range of issues emerging from the unprecedented scale, density and pace of change in cities. The associated challenges posed for social work include: the increased segregation of the poor, the crisis of affordable housing, homelessness, gentrification, ageing, displacement as a result of migrations, and the breakdown of social support and care. Drawing on multiple disciplines, this groundbreaking work shows that these familiar features of the twenty-first century can be counteracted by the positive aspects of the city: its innovation, creativity and serendipity. It has a redistributive, caring and cohesive potential. The city can provide new opportunities and resources for social work to influence, to collaborate, to foster participation and involvement, and to extend its social justice mandate. The book shows that the city represents a critical arena in terms of the future of social work intervention and social work identity. In doing so, it will be of great interest to students and scholars of social work, social policy, community work and urban studies.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Education first : submission to the Standing Committee on Legal and Social Issues of the Victorian Parliament Inquiry into Youth Justice Centres

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2017Description: 21 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: April 2017Summary: Early offending and antisocial behaviour cannot be considered in isolation from broader life experiences. Our society has failed many of the young people who get caught up in our youth justice system. The overwhelming majority of these young people have left school early, have been known to child protection, have lived in out-of-home care and been homeless. Many have experienced neglect, trauma, poverty, marginalisation and alienation which can limit their capacity to build a positive future. Many have walking along the well-trodden path to criminal behaviour—yet as a society we have lacked the systemic interventions to divert them from this path. By investing in children and young people to develop a positive asset base of skills, resources and opportunities, and strengthening the capacity of their families to provide a source of positive support, we can enable young people to gain a sense of purpose and belonging, which is critical to both preventing and breaking cycles of offending. The Brotherhood has a long history of working with children and young people (and their families and communities) who are ‘at risk’ of facing poor life outcomes—including those at risk of becoming or already involved in crime. This submission draws on the voices of young people, our research and our practical experience. We deliver school re-engagement, education and training programs to vulnerable children and young people. We are working closely with the out-of-home care sector to drive cultural change and reform arrangements for young people as they leave care. We are also heavily involved in supporting young people experiencing homelessness to secure the education and the opportunities needed to change their trajectory. This submission does not focus on police practices, court processes, sentencing or the operation and culture of Youth Justice Centres—which are outside the Brotherhood’s areas of expertise. Rather it focuses on prevention and early intervention, particularly through education and related measures to build the foundations for positive economic and social participation. Availability: (1)
Submission to the inquiry into school to work transition

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2017Description: PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: July 2017Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence welcomes the opportunity to respond to the Standing Committee on Employment, Education and Training’s new inquiry into the School to Work Transition. The Brotherhood holds deep knowledge about the supports and conditions that all young people need to navigate the transition from school to work. This expertise is based on research and evaluations conducted by our Research and Policy Centre on the interrelated issues of work, vocational education and training, school engagement and attainment, and employer partnerships. Importantly our understanding is also grounded in our long experience developing and delivering services for young people who, for both structural and individual reasons, struggle to make this transition. Strategic partnerships with government, business and the community are key to our approach with young people. Currently we work with: • Early school leavers, through the Navigator and Reconnect programs (funded by the Victorian Department of Education), our independent school (the David Scott School) for young people who have disengaged from mainstream schooling • Young people experiencing homelessness, through the Education First Youth Foyers (funded by the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services (DHSS) and Department of Education • Young people who are in out of home care settings, through delivery of the Certificate 1 in Developing Independence in state funded Out of Home Care Pilot (funded by DHHS) • Young people who are newly arrived migrants, through the Youth Transitions Support Pilot (funded by the federal Department of Social Services) • Young people who are unemployed, through the Transition to Work service (funded by the federal Department of Employment) • Young people living in public housing though Work and Learning Centres (funded by DHHS) Through our research, evaluations, service design and delivery we have identified the range of economic, social, institutional and individual factors that conspire to make this transition more difficult for young people today. We have also identified key principles as well as the essential program design elements for effecting successful school to work transitions for all young people and especially those who experience disadvantage. Our submission briefly outlines the Brotherhood’s understanding of the key, evidence-informed features of good practice in this field. We focus our response on the second and third terms of reference: opportunities to better inform and support students in relation to post-school education and training, and other relevant matters. Availability: (1)
Rough sleeping in Victoria : situation appraisal

by Nicholson, Tony | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Victoria. Department of Health and Human Services.

Publisher: unpublished. 2017Description: 54 p. PDF.Other title: Situation appraisal for the rough sleeping strategy.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: May 2017 Summary: This situation appraisal documents what is currently known about street homelessness in Victoria, commonly referred to as rough sleeping, with a view to informing discussion and development of a longterm strategy to reduce it. The situation appraisal will inform discussions with stakeholders during mid- 2017, prior to the development of advice on a Rough Sleeping Strategy to be provided to the Minister for Housing by the end of October 2017. In order to document what is currently known about people sleeping rough in Victoria, a variety of perspectives were sought. These came from three key sources: • data – analysis of point-in-time data, service usage data and service-specific data • discussions – meetings between the project team and selected key stakeholders involved in service delivery or support of people sleeping rough in Victoria • research – an extensive literature review and analysis of approaches to rough sleeping in other Australian jurisdictions and internationally. This information is drawn together in this situation appraisal to provide a comprehensive and nuanced understanding of rough sleeping in Victoria. It has informed the principles Availability: (1)
Transition to work community of practice : practice guide

by Brown, Diane | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | James, Sally | Mallett, Shelley | McTiernan, Niamh | Orchard, Nicholas | Cull, Emma.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2017Description: iv, 75 p. ill.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: August 2017 First published in March 2017; To develop this Practice Guide, BSL led a co-design process with the Transition to Work Community of Practice. Collectively, the CoP organisations tested and refined a number of foundational documents and tools; the feedback and expertise of their managers and CEOs, and the Youth Development Coaches and Employer Engagement Officers of each of these organsations (listed below), was instrumental in the development of this Practice Guide: Workways, Gen-Z Employment, Vocational Partnerships Group, School Industry Partnership, Australia Community Support Organisation, Colony 47, YouthWorX NT, Joblink Midwest, Anglicare South Australia, Brophy Family and Youth Services Summary: For several years now, the BSL has been developing and testing a different approach to working with young people experiencing disadvantage across a number of settings including employment, education and housing. In particular the TtW CoP Model has drawn on the approach taken by the Youth Transitions Program (YTP)2 and the EFY Foyers. The YTP was initially developed by the BSL in 2010 and delivered across three sites in western Melbourne with the aim of building the work aspirations and capabilities of young people experiencing disadvantage to engage in further learning and/or work. It provided a structured training component as well as connections to real world opportunities, engagement with the local community and referral to health and wellbeing services. In 2014, the BSL and Launch Housing (formerly Hanover Welfare Services) developed the EFY Foyer model with three Victorian Foyers currently operating at co-located Technical and Further Education (TAFE) sites across Victoria – two in Melbourne at Holmesglen TAFE in Glen Waverly and Bendigo Kangan TAFE in Broadmeadows, and one at Shepparton’s GO TAFE in regional Victoria. EFY Foyers provide integrated learning and student accommodation in mainstream educational settings for young people who are at risk of or experiencing homelessness, and prepares them to build the foundations for a sustainable livelihood. The model embeds an Advantaged Thinking approach in all its practices, processes and tools, which are designed to promote and build young people’s aspirations, skills and capacities. By prioritising engagement with education, the model builds young people’s connections to mainstream education, services and opportunities. Coupled with the research and evaluative work conducted by the BSL’s Research and Policy Centre, the learnings from these programs have informed the development of a set of core principles and features of a model. Through the TtW Community of Practice, this model is being tested and refined using the extensive expertise of the TtW CoP members, and adapted to suit local community contexts. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Steering social innovation : community agencies and the commissioning of Education First Youth Foyers / Shelley Mallett, Danielle Thornton and David Bryant

by Mallett, Shelley | Thornton, Danielle | Bryant, David.

Publisher: Carlton, Vic. : Australia and New Zealand School of Government (ANZSOG), 2018Description: 12 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: In the late 2000s, conversations between the CEOs of two Melbourne-based non-profits – Tony Nicholson of the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) and Tony Keenan of Hanover Welfare Services1 – revealed a shared frustration with the inadequacy of services designed to address youth homelessness. Both men thought that a narrow focus on crisis support and accommodation had led to a service system that was ill-equipped to address the reasons why some young people become homeless and why many struggle to escape the cycle of poverty and homelessness. They agreed that a new approach was needed, but it took years for a firm proposal to take shape, and longer still for the opportunity for change to present itself. But in the spring of 2010, with a close state election contest on the horizon, the leadership of both organisations saw a chance to win political support for innovation. The idea for a new approach to youth homelessness had fermented for years by the time Nicholson and Keenan developed their proposal for purpose-built student accommodation to be based on the principles of the UK Foyer Federation. There had been Foyers in Australia since the 1990s but none that specifically tied accommodation to participation in education as a precursor to sustainable employment and stable housing ; This case was written by Professor Shelley Mallett of the University of Melbourne and the Brotherhood of St Laurence, and Dr Danielle Thornton and David Bryant of the Brotherhood of St Laurence. It is based on original research conducted by the authors and is intended as a basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate either effective or ineffective handling of a managerial situation.; ANZSOG Case Program 2018-202.1; CC BY-NC-NDAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Foyer Futures : an appraisal of the merits of Foyers for Australia: potential directions for future growth

by Horn, Michael | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre.

Publisher: unpub. 2018Description: 50 p. PDF.Other title: A report for the Foyer Foundation.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: September 2018 Full report; Michael Horn is a Social Research Consultant and former Senior Manager in the Research and Policy Centre at the Brotherhood of St Laurence.; The author would like to acknowledge the assistance of the following key informants in undertaking this appraisal of the state of play of foyers in Australia: Shelley Mallett (BSL) Sally James (BSL) Joseph Borlagdan (BSL)Summary: The foyer model of supported housing assistance first started in Australia in 2003 with the Miller ‘Live and Learn’ Campus Service in Sydney. It was loosely based on the UK model of foyers which had evolved since the 1990’s in response to the growing challenge of unemployment and homelessness being experienced by young people. The development of the foyer model both in the UK and here in Australia has been well documented elsewhere. 1 Rather than retell the history of the foyer model, the following section provides a short overview of the current state of play pertinent to the critical review of progress to date that follows. Prior to the relatively recent development of a fidelity approach applied to Australian foyers through the accreditation process developed by the Foyer Foundation (FF), some provider agencies had adopted the ‘foyer’ label to describe their youth housing service delivery. This has made it difficult to quantify or describe the coverage of foyers or indeed measure their collective performance across the country. The organic and uncoordinated development of foyer and foyer like services by individual NfPs has limited the accumulation of evidence on both impact and documentation of the key elements attributable to outcomes. Despite significant recurrent funding (for example via the NPAH), State Governments have not undertaken any evaluation of the foyer like models in operation. The more recent wave of foyers - Foyer Oxford (WA) and Education First Youth Foyer (EFYF in Victoria) have dedicated resources to enable a more comprehensive evaluation methodology to be implemented using independent expertise. 2 This review draws on findings from these 2 approaches Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Brotherhood of St Laurence Historical Collection : Part of the Brotherhood of St Laurence Archive

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | University of Melbourne. E-Scholarship Research Centre | Adam, Winsome | Roberts, Jack | Croom, Alannah.

Publisher: Melbourne. Brotherhood of St Laurence. Social Policy Library 2019Description: 208 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Archival work completed by E-Scholarship Research Centre, University of Melbourne; Collection Overview The Brotherhood of St Laurence Archive is housed in the BSL Social Policy Library in the BSL Head Office at 67 Brunswick Street in Fitzroy, VIC. The archive contains an extensive set of records including primary sources including papers, photographs and audio-visual materials spanning from the early 20th Century to the present day. These records offer insight into the history of the Brotherhood of St Laurence and the many varied programs and activities that the Brotherhood has been engaged in, particularly social welfare and poverty related issues.Summary: Series 1: Tapes, Reels, CDs and DVDs, 1940s-2011 (pp. 4-37) This Series contains a large set of audio/video tapes and reels as well as assorted CDs and DVDs. Key topics include: Aboriginal issues; Aged care; Appeals; Brotherhood of St Laurence history, programs, activities, administration and members; Campaigns; Celebrations; Children; Community; Community care; Dementia; Depression; Driver recruitment; Employment; Exhibits and displays; Finance; Fundraising; Furniture and clothing appeal; Health; Historic photographs; History; Homelessness; Housing; Immigration; Jubilee Eucharist; Justice; Media; Mental health; Migrants; Parishioners; Personal care; Poverty; Pre-school; Presentations; Programs; Radio and TV promotions; Recycled clothing; Salvage bin; Show day; Single mothers; Social inclusion; Social support; Socialisation; Staff; Toy Appeal; Website; Youth. Key words include: "Friends and Brothers"; A. J. White; ABC; Adamstown; Canon Williams; Christian Television Association; Collins Court; Comic Relief; Coolibah; Cox Court; Fitzroy; Fitzroy Town Hall; Four Corners; Frankston; Geoffrey Sambell; Gerard Kennedy Tucker; Hippy Australia; Ivan Lean; Janet Galley OAM; Janet Holmes a Court; Jenny Trehewey; John Handfield; Joyce Clarke; Kevin Rudd; Nicolas Frances; Peter Hollingworth; Peter Thompson; R. H. Ford; Reverend Weidemann; Sambell Oration; Sandy Clark; Selwyn Reynolds; Viviene Abrahams; Whitehorse Boroondara Brotherhood. Key words include: "Friends and Brothers"; A. J. White; ABC; Adamstown; Canon Williams; Christian Television Association; Collins Court; Comic Relief; Coolibah; Cox Court; Fitzroy; Fitzroy Town Hall; Four Corners; Frankston; Geoffrey Sambell; Gerard Kennedy Tucker; Hippy Australia; Ivan Lean; Janet Galley OAM; Janet Holmes a Court; Jenny Trehewey; John Handfield; Joyce Clarke; Kevin Rudd; Nicolas Frances; Peter Hollingworth; Peter Thompson; R. H. Ford; Reverend Weidemann; Sambell Oration; Sandy Clark; Selwyn Reynolds; Viviene Abrahams; Whitehorse Boroondara Brotherhood. Series 2: Papers, 1875-2019 (pp. 37-75) This Series contains a large set of published and unpublished materials including books, reports, correspondence and other assorted papers. Key topics include: Aged care; Alcoholism; Appeals; Campaigns; Children; Christianity; Church in Australia; Community; Community Aid Abroad; Community service; Credit Co-op; Elderly; Emergency relief; Employment; Faith; Family; Family day care; Free school milk ; Fundraising; Government; History; Holiday camps; Home finance; Homelessness; Housing; Material Aid; Missionaries; Oral history; Pension reform ; Poverty; Programs; Publicity; Religion; Religious education ; Rent rebates; Royal Commission on Housing; Schools; Services; Slum clearance; Slums; Social policy; Social security; Social service; Social welfare; Unemployment; Urban; Welfare; Women; Youth. Key words include (contd.): Action Resource Centre (ARC); Archbishop of Melbourne; Austin family; Avalon Homestead; British and Foreign Bible Society; Carrum Downs; Charles Strong; Church of England; Collins Court; Commonwealth Commission of Inquiry into Poverty; Coolibah Club; Cox Court; Diana Chassell; Family Centre; Fitzroy; Frank William Coaldrake; Frederick Waldegrave Head; Geoffrey Sambell; Gerard Kennedy Tucker; Harold Holt; Hawke Government; Housing Commission of Victoria; Jessica Millott; John H. Reeves; John Handfield; Keble House; Lara; Maida Coaldrake; Michael Challen; Michael John Clarke; Millott House; Patricia Newell; Patrick John Murphy; Peninsula Division; Peter Hollingworth; St Laurence Chapel; St Laurence Trust Pty Ltd; Staff Association; Sumner House; Weston Bate; Womens Issues Group. Series 3: Photographs, 1905-2017 (pp. 75-208) This Series contains a large set of historic and contemporary photographs, negatives and slides. Key topics include: Aboriginal issues; Accommodation; Aged; Aged Accommodation; Appeals; Armadale Strike; Auxiliaries; Boys' Hostel; Brotherhood bin; Brotherhood Show Day; Campaigns; Camps; Carol service; Chapel; Charity; Child poverty; Children; Children's Centre, Fitzroy; Children's club; Christmas; Christmas Toy Club; Clothing; Community; Community Aid Abroad; Community Centre; Community education; Cottage settlement; Craft; Credit Union; Donated goods; Elderly; Employment; Exhibitions; Family; Family Day Care; Family Planning Clinic; Family services; Film stills; Food Co-operative; Free School Milk; Fundraising; Garden of Peace; Geelong Aged Accommodation; Government Ministers; Great Depression; Health clinic; Health initiatives; Healthcare; Historic films; History; Holiday camps; Home Improvement Service; Homeless; Homelessness; Housing; Housing Commission; Industrialisation; Jobskill; Library; Material Aid Service; Meal delivery; Meals on Wheels; Melbourne City Mission; Mission House; Mobile adventure camps; Mother's club; Pensioners; Portraits; Poverty; Projects; Protest; Publications; Recycling; Religious life; Salvage; Settlements; Slums; Social activities; Social service bureau; Social work; Staff; Toy sale; Training programs; Unemployed men's hostel; Unemployment; Unemployment Rights Service; Used car yard; Volunteers; Women; Worship; Youth; Youth club; Youth hostel; Youth programs. Key words include (contd.): Action Resource Centre; Adrian Harris; Alison McClelland; Alwyn Hind; Amber Dowd; Anne Deveson; Ardena Court, East Bentleigh; Atherton Gardens; Austin family; Australian Council of Social Services (ACOSS); Avalon Homestead; Banksia Centre; Basil Varghese; Bendigo; Betty Bradbury; Betty Matters; Bill Ford; Bob Hawke; Broadmeadows; Brotherhood 'Action'; Broughton Nursing Home; Bruce Buchanan; Bruce Prosser; Cannon Britten; Carinya Nursing Home; Carol Harrison; Carrum Downs; Cecil Tucker; Chapel of St Mark; Child Welfare Foundation; Christ Church, South Yarra; City of Oakleigh Central Library; Claire Moore; Collingwood; Collins Court; Connie Benn; Coolibah Club; Coolibah Day Centre; Cox Court; Craigieburn; Creative Leisure Centre; Dame Mary Herring; Dan Wilding; David Bucknall; David Green; David John Penman; David Kennedy MLA; David Meyer; David Scott; Deacon Alfred; Department of Housing and Regional Development; Diane Mazzonetto; Diane Millstead; Don Wilding; Donna Ward; Dorothy Brewin; Dot Peillon; Duncan Reilly; Dyranda Prevost; E. P. Cameron; Edmund Herring; Edna Walling (photographer); Elaine Martin; Eleanor Lindsay; Employment Action Centre; Eric Hart Activities Centre; Eric Mayer; Faith Godefrey; Family Day Care; Fitzroy Health Centre; Fitzroy High School; Fitzroy Proclamation Day 1938; Flinders Lodge Nursing Home; Frank William Coaldrake; Frank Woods; Frankston; "Friends and Brothers"; G K Tucker Park, Carrum Downs; Geelong; Geoffrey Sambell; George Street Primary School, Fitzroy; Gerard Kennedy Tucker; Gertrude Street; Glass Terrace; Glenrowan; Gospel Hall, Fitzroy; Gough Whitlam; Graham Bull; Graham Walker; Growing Victoria Together Summit; Guy Cox; Hampton Court; Hayden Raysmith; Hazel Hawke; Heatherton House; Holy Trinity Church, Lara; Horace Tucker; Housing Commission; Hume Court Hostel; Jackie Mittleman/Mittelman; Jan Carter; Janet (Jan) Taylor; Janet Gascoigne; Janet Paterson/Patterson; Jenie/Genie Manley; Jenny Lennox; Jessica Millott; Jessica Sumner; John Baillie; John Cain; John Gleeson; John H. Reeves; John Handfield; John Lindell; John Reeves; John Wise; Judith O'Neil; Keble Court; Keith Coaldrake; Ken Hodgson; Ken Pound; Ken Williams; Kimpton Court; Lady Anna Cowen; Lara; Laurence Industries; Lavinia Tucker; Leisure Centre; Limurru Cottage; Lionel Murphy; Malcolm Fraser; Margaret Bower; Margaret Kossatz; Material Aid; Maurice Wilson; May Day Fair, Bendigo; Meg Montague; Melbourne Grammar School; Merv Parker; Metropolitan Nursing Home; Michael B. Challen; Michael Challen; Michael Clarke; Michelle Cochrane; Millott House; Moore Street; Mornington Peninsula; Morven; Napier Street Child Care Cottage/Centre; Neville Brooke; Nicolas Frances; Oakleigh; Ormond Auxiliary; Osborne House; Our Lady's House of Welcome, Fitzroy; Ozanam House; Palmer Street; Patronal Festival; Peter Allen; Peter Dodd; Peter Hollingworth; Peter Spyker; Princes Hill 'Mirimbah' Country Centre; Promise the Children Action on Child Poverty Campaign; Prudence Court; Quentin Bryce; R. J. Hamer; Rob Hudson; Robert Hammond; Ronald Edwin Richards; Ronald F. Henderson; Ronald Gates; Saint Cuthbert's, East Brunswick; Sally Ryan; Salvage Depot; Sambell Lodge; Sambell Oration; Selwyn Reynolds; Shirlee Williams; Shirley Abraham; SJenny Lewis; Somerset Place, Carlton; Southern Memorial Hospital; SPAN; St Francis Church; St Francis Home/House; St Laurence Court, Bendigo; St Laurence House, Geelong; St Laurence Park, Lara; St Peter's Church, Eastern Hill; St Stephen House; Steve Bracks; Sue Blaikie; Sumner House; SWOP; Tania Trewenack; Thelma Tuxen; Trend Shop, Brotherhood Bazaar Brunswick; Victorian Teachers' Union; Voluntary Helpers' Shop, Camberwell; Wangaratta; Western Port; Winifred Rogers; Zelman Cowen. Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).
Under 16 Homelessness Taskforce : Ministerial Advice / Department of Communities Tasmania

by [Tasmania. Department of Communities].

Publisher: [Hobart, Tasmania] : [Department of Communities Tasmania] 2019Description: 115 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The number of unaccompanied children, under the age of 16, who are presenting to homeless services is increasing. Available data suggests that 98 children aged between 12-15 years presented alone (without an accompanying adult) to homeless shelters in Tasmania, which has increased by 39 per cent over the last two years. It is clearly arguable that these children are the most vulnerable in our society, they have no care and no financial means, making them highly exposed to predation, physical and sexual abuse, substance abuse and detention. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Revisiting Henderson : poverty, social security and basic income

by Saunders, Peter (ed.).

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne University Press 2019Description: xix, 428 p.Notes: Contributors: Francisco Azpitarte is Lecturer in Social Policy at Loughborough University, United Kingdom. Prior to that position, Francisco held the Ronald Henderson Research fellow position at the University of Melbourne and the Brotherhood of St Laurence. Francisco's research is focused on the analysis of socioeconomic inequality,poverty, and the impact of poverty on child development and the transmission of disadvantage across generations. Diarmuid Cooney-O'Donoghue is a research Officer at the Brotherhood of St Laurence Research and Policy Centre. His research interests include social security, the labour market and economic security Shelley Mallett is a Professorial Fellow in Social policy at the University of Melbourne and Director of the Research and Policy Centre at the Brotherhood of St Laurence. Her research interests include homelessness, health inequalities, employment and Australian social policy including social security Alison McCelland is a life member of the Brotherhood of St Laurence and Chair of the Board of Good Shepherd Australia New Zealand. Her main work has been directed to examining the impact of social and economic policies on the distribution of material well-being in Australia. Summary: The last comprehensive review of the Australian social security system was conducted over thirty years ago. Australia's economic and social landscape has changed markedly since then, and the system must adapt to these changes to ensure its ongoing relevance and efficacy. Reform of the system must recognise, respect and reinforce its profound impact on the lives and wellbeing of millions of Australians, not only during childhood and retirement but also when unexpected needs arise in-between. It is time for a fundamental reassessment of how the system can best promote social inclusion and encourage economic contribution in current and future circumstances. This book brings together leading social security researchers and policy analysts to reflect on past trends, the key changes that the system must adapt to and what this will involve. Its contributors share a vision inspired by the groundbreaking work of Ronald Henderson, who argued for a debate that is grounded in evidence and informed by a coherent set of principles. The book's chapters highlight the weaknesses of the current system and propose viable alternatives, showing that there is no lack of new ideas on which to draw. One of these-the introduction of a basic income as Henderson recommended in the 1970s-is used to illustrate the need for a better understanding of what such reforms can offer today and how they might work in practice. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (3).
Checked out (1).
Not simply business as usual : insights from Money For Jam, a micro-enterprise initiative for older women

by Wickramasinghe, Seuwandi | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Bowman, Dina.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 27 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Money For Jam was developed by Per Capita as an empowerment program that encourages economic participation of older women by fostering self-confidence and helping them to establish micro-enterprises. The approach was informed by co-design workshops with 13 older women who had experienced homelessness. The pilot in 2017 was a joint project with Women’s Housing, Fitted for Work and En Masse, and involved two service delivery modes: class-based learning and an interactive mobile app. This study commissioned by Per Capita from the Brotherhood of St Laurence examined the pilot and its impacts, and made suggestions for program development and policy advocacy. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Reclaiming social security for a just future : a principled approach to reform

by Bowman, Dina | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Thornton, Danielle | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 12 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Working PaperSummary: In this working paper, the authors propose five indivisible principles to underpin Australia’s social security system so that it contributes to a just, fair and compassionate society. Our social security system is ill equipped to respond to current and future technological, demographic, environmental and geopolitical challenges. The authors argue that social security needs to be reframed as being there for ‘for all of us’, emphasising the unpredictability of life events such as becoming disabled or experiencing an unexpected health downturn, becoming a carer to a child or partner, or experiencing family violence leading to homelessness. Principles from Australia’s past and from overseas provide much food for thought. The aim of this paper is to start a wider conversation about how Australia can enable economic security for all, now and in the future Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
BSL Youth Department’s approach to Communities of Practice : a foundation paper

by Brown, Diane | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Cull, Emma.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 9 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: June 2019; The BSL Youth Department’s overarching ambition is to inform the systemic reform of education, employment and welfare sectors to ensure they enable the provision of opportunities for young people experiencing disadvantage to participate fully in mainstream social and economic life.Summary: This ambition is based on the recognition that the issuesfacing young people in transition from school to work in Australia cannot be reduced to individual or familial level factors; they are also consequence of structural issues in the labour market, compounded by institutional level arrangements including the commissioning and governance of key services. A key part of the way BSL’s Youth Department works to achieve this ambition for change is to foster collaboration through the establishment of Communities of Practice (CoPs). This includes multi-sectoral collaboration with a range of service providers working with young people experiencing disadvantage (including education, homelessness, justice, OoHC sectors) and across Departments within local, State and Federal Governments. BSL’s non-competitive approach to service delivery and commitment to co-design enables us to work collaboratively across key sectors, while recognising the considerable knowledge, expertise and assets of locally based communities and the value of small organisations in their communities. Through CoPs, BSL also seeks to unite community organisations to work collaboratively on evidencing and implementing effective ways of working, to be a collective voice for change. BSL currently plays a role as an enabling organisation for a range of CoPs that have different agendas, but which also share common principles and key features, which are outlined later in this paper. Founded on principles of coproduction and collaboration rather than competition, BSL facilitates multi-sectoral collaboration and practice reform with a view to fostering innovation through harnessing collective effort, sharing ideas and experimenting with new approaches. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
[Submission to] Co-designing the National Skills Commission

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 11 p. PDF.Other title: Submission re Co-designing the National Skills Commission | [Submission to] National Skills Commission Taskforce Department of Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: 22 November 2019 Summary: This submission draws on our practical experience, along with our research and that of others. Our skills and training related work includes: • partnering with TAFEs to support young people to access and sustain engagement with education and training. This includes establishment (with Launch Housing) of Education First Youth Foyers. This supportive accommodation, located on TAFE campuses, enables young people experiencing (or at risk of) homelessness to engage in education and training that helps alter their life trajectory. • delivering training to a diverse range of learners – particularly those experiencing disadvantage – through our Group Training Organisation, Learn Local and our former Registered Training Organisation. • operating the David Scott School – a high support model for young people who had fallen out of education. Over 120 senior secondary students are currently undertaking the Victorian Certificate in Applied Learning at the school. • innovative employment support models, sustained by philanthropic, corporate, state and federal funding. The includes delivering the youth-focused Transition to Work program, convening a national Community of Practice of (some) TtW providers and facilitating the National Youth Employment Body. • Major Australia-wide research projects commissioned by the National Centre for Vocational Education Research, as well as numerous evaluations of VET related support services. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to the Legal & Social Issues Committee of the Victorian Parliament : inquiry into homelessness in Victoria

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 22 p. PDF.Other title: Submission to the Inquiry into Homelessness in Victoria.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: March 2020Summary: The Brotherhood is pleased to contribute to this critical Victorian Parliamentary Inquiry into Homelessness. It comes at a time when more and more Victorians are struggling to keep a roof over their head.1 Particularly alarming is the large and growing number (over one million Victorians) of low-income private renters facing unaffordable and unsustainable rents. Secure, affordable and appropriate housing is not simply nice to have. Along with transport, telecommunications and IT infrastructure, affordable housing in locations with access to jobs is pivotal to our state’s productivity and economic growth. Housing is also fundamental to nurturing family, success in education, holding down work, being involved in community life, and general wellbeing. Investment in affordable housing provides downstream savings in social services, justice and health. This submission draws on our practical experience along with our research and that of others. We focus on systemic approaches to preventing homelessness—in line with the vision of the Brotherhood’s founder, Fr Gerard Tucker, to build the fence at the top of the cliff rather than park the ambulance at the bottom. Accordingly, we urge the Inquiry to place structural causes of homelessness at the front and centre of their deliberations. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety : recommendations from the inter-agency Aged Care Reference Group to address deep and persistent disadvantage

by Aged Care Reference Group.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Aged Care Reference Group, 2020Description: 10 p. PDF.Other title: Submission to the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: This submission is the result of consultations with a broad range of organisations, including the Brotherhood of St Laurence, Catholic Social Services Victoria, Housing for the Aged Action Group (HAAG), Jesuit Social Services, Prague House, Sacred Heart Mission, St Mary’s House of Welcome and VincentCare.; Key contacts for the organisations represented in this Group: Amber Mills, Senior Research Fellow, Inclusive Ageing, Research and Policy Centre Brotherhood of St Laurence and James Finnis Policy Advisor, Inclusive Communities Research and Policy Centre Brotherhood of St Laurence. Summary: All older people in Australia should enjoy the same high standards of care. Unfortunately, this is not the case for many older people who experience deep and persistent disadvantage. This category of deep and persistent disadvantage describes any older person suffering from the effects of poverty, trauma and/or social isolation, homelessness, and anyone with reduced capacity to live independently or without informal support/s from family, friends or carers. We estimate that there are over 18,000 older people in Australia1 experiencing this type of disadvantage who cannot readily access aged care or who are not welcome in many services. These older people have much to offer, but they also have special aged care needs stemming from a lifetime of disadvantage. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Inquiry into homelessness in Victoria : final report / Parliament of Victoria. Legislative Council. Legal and Social Issues Committee

by Victoria. Parliament. Legislative Council. Legal and Social Issues Committee | Patten, Fiona.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Victorian Government Printer, 2021Description: [504 p.] + [44p.] PDF.Online Access: Main Report | Summary | Website Summary: In this report the Committee recommends a wide-ranging suite of measures aimed at achieving outcomes through an extensive effort towards early intervention to assist in the prevention of homelessness. At the heart of the Committee’s final report is the belief that we need a two-pronged approach in order to remediate homelessness in Victoria: • We need to strengthen early intervention measures to identify individuals at risk and to prevent them from becoming homeless. • We must provide more long-term housing for the homeless. These should be the core aims of the Victorian Government. Notwithstanding these goals, improvements are also needed around the use and management of short- and medium-term accommodation options—specifically, crisis and transitional housing. The Committee believes that the homelessness crisis in Victoria demands immediate and ongoing attention from the Victorian Government. The complexity of the issue cannot be understated, with a myriad of often overlapping risk factors that make people vulnerable during unexpected crisis points. Without appropriate support people can find themselves homeless. To address the varying causes and manifestations of homelessness a wide range of solutions are required. The Committee believes that implementation of the broad-ranging and complementary suite of recommendations made in our Final Report will significantly improve the Victorian Government’s response to homelessness across the state. During the course of this inquiry, we saw how emergencies such as bushfires and the COVID-19 pandemic can have a devastating effect on the most vulnerable in our community. The Committee urges the government to monitor outcomes for disadvantaged sectors over the next few years as we determine what the long-term effects of these crises will be. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Foyer Foundation [Website]

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic Foyer Foundation 2021Online Access: Foyer Foundation website | National Foyer Community of Practice Notes: Link to Foyer Foundation website and National Foyer Community of Practice page. Updated 2-21; In 2017 the Foyer Foundation embarked upon an important partnership with the national anti-poverty organisation, the Brotherhood of St Laurence. This partnership enables the Foundation to expand the Foyer concept to new communities across the nation and tap into the extensive knowledge, service development and research expertise of the Brotherhood of St Laurence - website (who we are); The Community of Practice harnesses effort and expertise at a national level to: •Share expertise to identify ‘what works’ across Foyers. •To ensure that research informs practice and contributes to a cycle of continuous improvement, and that there is rigour to data collection, evaluation and monitoring efforts. - National Foyer Community of Practice page. •Provide guidance on the development or refinement of tools and resources to support service delivery, and share these amongst members of the CoP to enhance practice. •Share and identify opportunities for innovation and improvement, including potential partnerships. •Identify and develop opportunities for campaigning about Youth Foyers within the broader service system Summary: Foyers provide a point in time service that enable young people in transition to develop and achieve educational and employment pathways, exiting in a sustainable way from welfare and service dependence. While there are programs in both the education and homelessness sectors that seek to support young people experiencing disadvantage with their education or accommodation across Australia, there are almost no fully integrated service models focused on education and employment outcomes. The key to the model lies in the provision of stable accommodation for up to two years in a supported, congregate living environment. For young people who are unable to rely on family support in this critical developmental stage, Foyers provide the time, personalised attention, mentoring, coaching and access to opportunities needed to lead fulfilling, independent and productive lives. A Youth Foyer is much more than a supported accommodation facility, or welfare program. Utilising an ‘Advantaged Thinking’ approach, Foyers seek to tap into the goals and ambitions of young people and nurture their talents while building skills for life. At heart, the Foyer model is based on the life-changing proposition that the most constructive thing we can do for young people is to ensure they become educated, employable and empowered so they can build better lives for themselves, and achieve genuine independence. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Response to the National Skills Commission Care Workforce Labour Market Study discussion paper / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 10 p. PDF.Other title: BSL response to the National Skills Commission Care Workforce Labour Market Study discussion paper.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: BSL is pleased to contribute to the consultation for the development of the Care Workforce Labour Market Study. Our response is confined to considering three of the discussion questions through a youth employment lens. BSL considers that the Study should pay attention to the structural barriers that are driving misalignment between supply and demand in the care labour market, with a focus on the opportunities and challenges that present for the youth workforce . This response has been informed by our work through the National Youth Employment Body (NYEB), which is working towards sustainable youth employment and meeting local workforce needs. We would be pleased to provide further insights on the specific supports that young people would need to develop meaningful and sustainable employment pathways in the care sector. This submission draws on our practical experience, along with our research and that of others. Our related work includes: • innovative employment support models, sustained by philanthropic, corporate, state and federal funding. This includes delivering the youth-focused Transition to Work (TtW) program, convening a national Community of Practice of (some) TtW providers and facilitating the NYEB • delivering training to a diverse range of learners—particularly those experiencing disadvantage—through our Group Training Organisation, Learn Local and our former Registered Training Organisation • partnering with TAFEs to support young people to access and sustain engagement with education and training. This includes establishment (with Launch Housing) of Education First Youth Foyers. This supportive accommodation, located on TAFE campuses, enables young people experiencing (or at risk of) homelessness to engage in education and training that helps alter their life trajectory • major Australia-wide research commissioned by the National Centre for Vocational Education Research and others, as well as numerous evaluations of VET-related support services. [Summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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