Brotherhood of St Laurence

National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

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The genesis of the NDIS : bringing competing agendas together

by Galbally, Rhonda | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic Brotherhood of St Laurence 2016Description: 11 p. PDF.Other title: Sambell Oration 2016.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Melbourne 1 December 2016Summary: The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is undoubtedly one of the biggest social policy reforms Australia has ever seen – a once-in-a-generation reform alongside Medicare and national superannuation. In delivering the Sambell Oration this evening, I’m going to explore where we have come from to achieve this profound change and the journey it took to get here. I hope that this reflection will make it possible to understand the genesis of competing agendas that still impact on the NDIS to this day.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Response to the Productivity Commission study of National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) costs

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2017Description: 21 p. PDF.Notes: April 2017Summary: As one of the largest social reforms since Medicare, the ongoing viability and support of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is vital. People with disability have the right to be treated with dignity and participate in the civic, social and economic life of Australia. The NDIS is visionary in its approach, underpinned by the principles of choice, control and independence for people with disability and an insurance approach that looks to reduce long-term costs by increasing an individual’s independence and participation. If the NDIS achieves this, it will make Australia more equitable and prosperous. As the NDIS is rolled out across the nation, a nimble, adaptive approach will be required. The Brotherhood believes that it is unreasonable to expect that implementation of major reform such as this will be perfect from the start. It will take some time to get the implementation right. As a Local Area Coordinator (LAC) working in partnership with the National Disability Insurance Agency in the North East Melbourne Area, we believe that strong partnerships are vital to achieve the objectives of the NDIS. The partnership forged between the Brotherhood and NDIA is respectful, reciprocal and valuable and has the potential to provide enormous value to the NDIS and the communities we serve. The Brotherhood believes that the success of the NDIS is highly dependent on adopting a local approach. LAC is in a unique position to support a localised approach that builds on the assets and strengths of communities and participants. By working at a local level, both NDIA and LACs can focus on removing barriers for people with disability to participate in the civic, social and economic life of their communities; assist communities to take an active role in supporting the NDIS; and hold mainstream services accountable for meeting the needs of people with disability, their families and carers. This has the potential to deliver cost savings to the NDIS and make communities more responsible for supporting people with disability, their families and carers to achieve their goals and aspirations. The recommendations below specifically address areas that our staff and participants in the NDIS have suggested for improving the scheme and ensuring ongoing sustainability: Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to the Market Readiness Inquiry of the Joint Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2018Description: 19 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: February 2018Summary: As an independent non-government organisation with strong community links that has been working to reduce poverty in Australia since the 1930s, the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) has a strategic focus on building community inclusion for people experiencing social exclusion. This commitment is reflected in our role as a Local Area Coordination (LAC) and Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) provider in the North Eastern Metropolitan Area (NEMA), Hume-Moreland Area and Bayside-Peninsula in Victoria. We have been delivering LAC since July 2016 as part of the first phase of implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). We commenced work as an ECEI provider in November 2016. Our engagement in this planning and community capacity building work is driven by the recognition, underlined by research including our own social exclusion monitor, that people with disability are among the most socially and economically excluded Australians. To maximise the opportunity for efficient and effective implementation of LAC and ECEI, we regularly consult with participants, staff and providers to determine their experience in the NDIS. The input from these three groups has helped to formulate this submission and proposed recommendations. Availability: (1)
BSL response to Productivity Commission Inquiry into National Disability Agreement

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2018Description: 5 p. PDF.Other title: Response to Productivity Commission National Disability Ageement Review.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The BSL is an independent non-government organisation with strong community links that has been working to reduce poverty in Australia. Since the 1930s, BSL has maintained a strategic focus on building community inclusion for people experiencing social exclusion, including people with disability. This commitment is reflected in our role as a Local Area Coordination (LAC) and Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) provider in the three regions across Melbourne. Operating these programs provides us with unique insight into the implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and the need to refocus and support the ongoing existence of the NDA.Availability: (1)
Submission to the NDIS Thin Markets Project Consultation Department of Social Services

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 27 p. PDF.Other title: Submission to the Department of Social Services NDIS Thin Markets Project Consultation | BSL submission to the NDIS Thin Markets Project Consultation .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: July 2019 Summary: The scope, scale and timeframe for establishment of the NDIS market make its development particularly complicated. The market must cover all types of disability and enormous geographical spread, as well as other types of diversity (e.g. culturally and linguistically diverse communities and people experiencing poverty). These challenges are becoming more evident as the scheme is rolled out. Many participants and their families report they are waiting too long for support, are unable to implement their plan and are struggling to navigate the new and complex system (Joint Standing Committee 2018a). Providers report they continue to struggle to maintain financial viability while delivering quality services and meeting administrative requirements, leading to a steady pace of market exit for certain services (Mathys & Randall 2019). Some of these challenges are technical and transitional (i.e. a matter of poor implementation and/or the predictable adjustments that come with a reform of this scale). However, we contend that many of the challenges outlined in the Discussion Paper are arising because market-based service provision simply does not work for everyone. This view is grounded in evidence from Australia and overseas, as well as our own service experience. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Co-designing practice frameworks for families and practitioners working for the early childhood early intervention (ECEI) program

by Karasaki, Mutsumi | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2019Description: 14 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The aim of this research project is to develop assessment and goal-setting practice frameworks that can solve challenges currently being experienced by families and practitioners in the implementation of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) program for young children with developmental delay or disability, and their families. The project will also explore experiences of implementing a participatory approach in the service design process. Using a participatory design approach, this project will draw together families/carers, ECEI practitioners, and disability and early childhood scholars to co-design the practice frameworks that improve tools, strategies and procedures used in assessment of developmental delays, and in setting goals with families. The frameworks will be accompanied by training and capacity building resources (hereinafter training resources) for implementing the practice frameworks, also co-designed by the practitioners and families. The training resources will contain materials that explain why the particular practice frameworks may be beneficial to practitioners and families, and how they can be used. The practice framework and the training resources will then be piloted in a Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) ECEI region for further refinement in an iterative process. We intend this project to influence the national design of the ECEI approach. Therefore, upon completion of the project, the frameworks will be presented to the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA), the statutory agency implementing the NDIS, for potential scaling up to a wider roll-out. The second aim of the project is to describe and analyse experiences of people involved in the participatory design project. We will identify benefits and challenges of conducting a participatory research project that engages service providers and users in designing of the services. We will also explore whether participating in the project can facilitate participants’ change-making capacities. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme NDIS Planning Inquiry

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 4 p. PDF.Other title: [Submission to] Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: September 2019Summary: The NDIS is a once-in-a-generation social policy reform. Its promise of choice and control and personcentred support is enshrined in the NDIS Act (2013), which affirms the right of people with a disability (alongside their families and carers) to ‘determine their own best interests and make decisions that affect their own lives’ (17A (1)). This transformative potential is in many ways contingent upon the quality of the planning process as a key determinant of both the success and the sustainability of the scheme. However, longstanding issues with the adequacy and quality of plans are well documented. Among others the Productivity Commission’s 2017 NDIS costs inquiry found poor quality planning impacted administrative efficiency and allocative efficacy, as well as participant satisfaction and outcomes. 1 Many participants and their families report feeling overwhelmed, confused and disempowered by the planning process as a result of too little time to build their understanding of the NDIS, the inability to view a draft plan, and the lack of communication and transparency regarding decision making. A 2016 audit by the Australian National Audit Office on the management of the transition to the NDIS found that the rate of unscheduled plan reviews and appeals to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal has far surpassed expectations, placing significant pressure on the NDIA and creating additional stress and frustration for participants. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to Inquiry into access to TAFE for learners with disability / Brotherhood of St Laurence

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 11 p. PDF.Other title: Improving access to TAFE for people with disability | [Submission to] Legislative Assembly Economy and Infrastructure Committee : Inquiry into access to TAFE for learners with disability.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This submission draws on our experience as a National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Partner in the Community delivering Local Area Coordination (LAC) services in the North Eastern Metropolitan, Hume Moreland, Western Melbourne, Brimbank Melton and Bayside Peninsula areas in Victoria. It also reflects views expressed in earlier Brotherhood submissions, as well as learnings from our partnership with the Melbourne Disability Institute of the University of Melbourne. Our submission draws on extensive service delivery, research and advocacy relating to education and vocational training for disadvantaged communities.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission regarding the National Disability Strategy beyond 2020 : Department of Social Service Stage 2 consultations / Brotherhood of St Laurence and Mission Australia

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mission Australia.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2020; Sydney, NSW : Mission Australia, 2020Description: 18 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The National Disability Strategy (NDS) 2010–2020 was a landmark achievement, representing a new, rights-based and whole-of-life approach to disability policy in Australia. Most importantly, it was deeply informed by the voices and experiences of people with disability. The Shut Out report, and the Strategy that stemmed from its findings, was a call to action for Australia to enable people with disability, their families and carers to live lives that they value. Since 2010, much has been achieved under the NDS. Critical policy and legislative changes have been implemented—notably the world-first National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS), a National Framework for Reducing and Eliminating the Use of Restrictive Practices, and state and territory legislation and action plans to promote inclusion and accessibility. The NDS has also elevated the public discourse around disability, driving improvements in community awareness and attitudes, and a gradual shift towards rights-based approaches in disability support. However, systemic and structural challenges continue to significantly affect people with disability. There are stark differences in life experiences and opportunities between people with and without disability. As has been widely acknowledged, we still have a long way to go. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to Senate Inquiry into NDIS Amendment (Participant Service Guarantee and Other Measures) / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: [9 p.] PDF.Other title: Submission to the Inquiry into the National Disability Insurance Scheme Amendment (Participant Service Guarantee and Other Measures) Bill 2021 | [Submission to] Committee Secretary Senate Standing Committees on Community Affairs.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: BSL made a submission to the DSS consultation on the Exposure Draft of the NDIS Amendment (Participant Service Guarantee and Other Measures) Bill 2021. That submission is attached for your information. BSL supports the intent of the Draft Bill to improve participant experience and simplify processes, and we note that amendments have been made in the Draft Bill tabled on 28 October in the House of Representatives in response to issues raised during the consultation. However, we still hold concerns that the current Bill, if allowed to proceed as drafted, along with anticipated future developments, could result in continued erosion of the Scheme principles and design, and undermine choice and control for people with disability, and their families and carers over time. In relation to the tabled Draft Bill, we raise the following concerns: The short time allowed for consultation is unfortunate, particularly as the Independent Advisory Council had recommended a period of 8 weeks to enable people with disabilities to participate as fully as possible. The Draft Bill does not include the Rules that will accompany the NDIS Act, preventing them being scrutinised by the Parliament, and identification of any changes that may, or may not, have been made to them. The Department of Social Services clarified during Senate Estimates that it is not the intention of the Bill to exclude people with fluctuating physical impairments, and the explanatory memorandum also clarifies that non-psychosocial conditions which ‘vary in intensity from time to time’ can still be assessed as permanent. However, we hold concerns that failure to stipulate this in the Act may lead to unintended consequences. The Draft Bill has provided some limits on the CEO’s ability to vary plans, and includes a requirement for the variation to be prepared ‘with’ the participant. However, it is not clear how the participant will be involved in the variation, and we don’t believe the limits are sufficient to address the concerns raised in our submission. We also note that amendments made to the Principles that guide the Act (s 4) have removed moderating language: ‘to the extent of their ability’ in subsection 4(2); ‘to the full extent of their capacity’ in subsection 4(8). We are concerned that this may have the effect of reducing the requirements of level of support provided. We welcome the amendment to the provision of information to participants about decisions made by the Agency, from ‘on request’ to automatic provision of information Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Response to the exposure draft of the NDIS Amendment (Participant Service Guarantee and Other Measures) Bill 2021 / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley | Hall, Susan.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 6 p. PDF.Other title: BSL response to exposure draft of the NDIS Amendment (Participant Service Guarantee and Other Measures) Bill 2021.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: BSL is an NDIS Partner in the Community. We have been delivering LAC in five regions across Victoria since July 2016 as part of the first phase of NDIS implementation. We commenced as an ECEI provider in November 2016, and now work with around 40,000 people with a disability in LAC and ECEI. We welcome the opportunity to provide a response to the Exposure Draft of the NDIS Amendment (Participant Service Guarantee and Other Measures) Bill 2021. BSL supports the intent of the draft Bill to improve participant experience and simplify processes through: the inclusion of the Participant Service Guarantee and Participant Engagement Principles into the Act ; recognition of people with disability as central to the Scheme and the need to engage them in codesign of the Scheme and its processes ; capacity building and choice and control for people with disability ; acknowledgement of the important relationships between people with disability, their families and carers ; scope to vary plans ; clarification of the role of the Quality and Safety Commission, and expanding the Commonwealth Ombudsman’s powers to report on the performance of the NDIA. On the other hand, we identify several critical concerns in the proposed changes in the Exposure Draft, which we detail in our submission. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Response to NDIS consultation paper : Supporting young children and their families early to reach their full potential / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 19 p. PDF.Other title: Supporting young children and their families early to reach their full potential : response to NDIS consultation paper.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The NDIS review of the Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) Approach aims to ensure a better experience for young children and their families. The recommendations for a reset, developed with sector consultation, and the opportunities for input into the aims and recommendations of the reset have been welcomed by Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) staff. BSL fully supports 17 of the 23 recommendations. For these, we have made some specific observations, including the need to build Early Childhood partner capacity through a workforce strategy and resourcing to ensure successful implementation. BSL partially supports, or supports in principle, another five recommendations, with our reasons included in this response. • We do not support recommendation 9 overall, due to limited information about such a significant change to key processes for young children, though we see merit in some elements of the recommendation. The issue of independent assessments has raised concerns for participants and their families, and services. It is not yet clear what is proposed for access and planning but there is support for a comprehensive assessment including observation, use of standardised tools and consideration of family capability and circumstances, but concerns about use of the results to inform access and planning decisions including budgets. BSL suggests the concept of ‘a plan for all’ using NDIS Early Childhood Services. Such a plan would support a better experience for participants and families, as it could be used differently as needs change. A plan might or might not include funded supports, and could minimise the concept of transition as the plan would apply before, during and after their provision. BSL welcomes the opportunity to continue to work with NDIA to deliver a better experience for NDIS Early Childhood service users including participants, and their families. [Summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Response to NDIS consultation papers on independent assessments, access and eligibility policy, and planning policy / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 30 p. PDF.Other title: Independent assessments, access and eligibility policy, and planning policy : response to NDIS consultation papers | BSL Response to NDIS Access and Planning Policy consultation papers.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: NDIA consultation for proposed changes to access and planning BSL welcomes the opportunity to participate in this consultation regarding planned changes to access and planning in the NDIS, including the introduction of independent assessments (IAs). The rollout of the NDIS has been of tremendous benefit for people with disability – and the broader community – over the past 5 years. As noted by the Productivity Commission in 2011, the previous disability support system was “underfunded, unfair, fragmented and inefficient”, and gave “people with disability little choice and no certainty of access to appropriate supports”. It is clear that – by every measure – the NDIS is a vast improvement on the system that preceded it. Nevertheless, the case for ongoing improvement is clear. We support: • the Agency’s objectives to improve consistency of decision-making and equity; • the revision of Access processes to focus on the impact of disability on a person’s life rather than a specific diagnosis; • the provision of fully funded assessments which remove many barriers to access. • Increasing flexibility for plan budget usage. We have concerns that the agency may be rushing implementation of the changes, and that the results of trials have not yet been evaluated and incorporated into the processes. Given the scope and scale of the proposed reforms, we believe that the Agency will be well served by taking the time to gain more insight from people with disability, their families and carers so that everyone can have confidence that the changes will bring the desired improvements. With that in mind, BSL has identified a number of improvements to the Policies under consultation, which are itemised in our recommendations. We thank the Agency for its openness to feedback through this consultation. [Summary] ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Response to the Victorian Disability Plan 2021-2024 Consultation / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 4 p. PDF.Other title: Brotherhood of St. Laurence response to Victorian Disability Plan 2021-2024 Consultation.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: A great deal has been achieved under the 2017–20 Victorian Disability Plan, Absolutely Everyone, and in particular, we welcome the rights-based approach and focus on outcomes underpinning that Plan. However, it is clear that much more needs to be done to achieve ‘an inclusive Victoria which supports people with disability to live the satisfying everyday lives’ that the Plan strives for. In particular, we raise the following current developments as considerations for the next Plan - page 1 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Interventions for children on the autism spectrum : response to NDIA Consultation / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 8 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) welcomes the opportunity to respond to the NDIS consultation on Interventions for Children on the Autism Spectrum. BSL welcomes the stated intention of the proposed changes – i.e. to streamline and create certainty and consistency for participants and their families and carers through a ‘focus on what should constitute reasonable and necessary early intervention supports for children on the autism spectrum’. While we generally support the identified principles and standards and suggest the standards could be usefully elevated to guidelines, we ask the Agency to identify how the standards will be implemented and monitored. BSL does, however, hold concerns about the model of budget allocation, the rationale for it and the process undertaken to implement the changes. In addition, we are concerned that this model implies that children with autism require a separate model of service provision, and believe that is inequitable and against the Principles of the NDIS Act. BSL recommends that NDIA: 1. Clarify how Independent Assessments (IA) will translate into the levels identified for children with autism, and how the IA and planning process will be undertaken. 2. Pilot the proposed IA and planning process for children on the autism spectrum to ascertain its effectiveness and impacts. 3. Remove the association of funding levels with a specific diagnosis. 4. Halt work on the proposed interventions model and funding for children on the autism spectrum, in line with the IA process, to allow time: o to incorporate changes and any developments to the process resulting from the IA trial and Minister’s consultations; and o to undertake a trial of the proposed model for children on the autism spectrum. 5. Clarify the basis for the proposed funding model, including age-based categorisation, and provide data on dual diagnosis and plan budget utilisation as an evidence base for funding levels. 6. Undertake a more comprehensive consultation with families and carers, and with providers, to develop a model that best meets the needs and goals of children on the autism spectrum, in line with Scheme principles and intent, and with ECEI reset recommendations. 7. Develop tools and resources, in collaboration with families and carers, and providers, to support families’ and carers’ decision making and understanding of the autism interventions and supports.[Summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Independent Assessments in NDIS : response to Joint Standing Committee / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 16 p. PDF.Other title: BSL Submission to the Joint Standing Committee Independent Assessment Inquiry.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) welcomes the opportunity to contribute to the Joint Standing Committee’s Independent Assessments inquiry. The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) was established to replace an unsustainable disability system which was ‘underfunded, unfair, fragmented, and inefficient’ with one which takes a lifetime approach to investing in people with a disability and their families, so they can live an ordinary life (PC 2011, p. 2). This approach recognises that by building the independence and social and economic participation of people with a disability, the NDIS will reduce long-term costs and produce a return on investment to taxpayers. This is a transformative Scheme, not only for people with disability and their families and carers, but also for the Australian community. The rollout of the NDIS has been of tremendous benefit for people with disability – and the broader community – over the past five years. By every measure, the NDIS is a vast improvement on the system that preceded it. In our experience, people with disability are also growing in confidence and expectations for social and economic participation as a result of the Scheme, especially when they receive respectful and reliable assistance and support through a designated Local Area Coordinator or Planner. Unsurprisingly – given that the Scheme is only two years from full rollout in most states and is still rolling out in WA – the NDIS is not perfect and the case for ongoing improvement is clear. The Tune Review (2019) clearly highlighted some of the flaws and frustrations with the implementation of the Scheme, and notably specified 29 recommendations which had widespread support. With that in mind, we support: • the Agency’s objectives to improve consistency of decision-making and equity; • the revision of Access processes to focus on the impact of disability on a person’s life rather than a specific diagnosis, particularly when determining access to the Scheme; • the provision of fully funded assessments for all participants; • focusing the role of Local Area Coordinators on helping a person to navigate the Scheme and make the most of community and mainstream supports • increasing flexibility for plan budget usage. However, we are receiving strong feedback from people with disability, families and carers expressing concern that ‘Independent Assessments‘ (as proposed) will take the Scheme backwards rather than forwards. The depth of community concern should not be underestimated and stands in contrast to the support, hope and excitement which accompanied the creation of the Scheme. [Summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Local Area Coordination Practice Framework / Brotherhood of St Laurence. NDIS Services

by Brotherhood of St Laurence. NDIS Services.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: v, 38 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Local Area Coordination Practice Framework has been developed by Brotherhood of St Laurence NDIS Services and is based on: consultations with people with disability and their families; consultation with, and knowledge of, BSL’s own workforce; international and historical local practice, research and evaluation; and published NDIS resources. The purpose of the Framework is: to act as a practical resource for Local Area Coordinators; to support a consistent, principles-based approach to practice across all BSL NDIS Services regions and teams; to deliver great services to people with disability, their families and the communities we serve; to broaden understanding of the Local Area Coordination approach at BSL; and to contribute to the ongoing development of Local Area Coordination in Australia. As a Partner in the Community, BSL works alongside and supports people regardless of their eligibility for NDIS-funded supports. Any reference in the Framework to supporting people in the NDIS or their ‘NDIS journey’ also includes people who are not eligible for NDIS-funded supports. ; TABLE OF CONTENTS: Acknowledgement of Country ii -- Acknowledgements iv -- Acronyms iv -- Welcome – A Message from Our Director v -- ABOUT THIS PRACTICE FRAMEWORK 1 -- About BSL NDIS Services 2 -- SECTION 1: BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT 3 : History of Local Area Coordination 4 -- Local Area Coordination Model of Practice 4 -- The evidence base 5 -- Local Area Coordination under the NDIS 6 -- SECTION 2: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES 8 : Local Area Coordination principles 9 -- Local Area Coordination principles in everyday practice 11 --- Local Area Coordination practices 12 -- Applying Local Area Coordination key principles to practices 14 -- SECTION 3: EMBEDDING THE FRAMEWORK 30 -- Embedding the Local Area Coordination principles-based approach to practice 31 -- SECTION 4: SERVICE OUTCOMES, PERFORMANCE AND MEASUREMENT 33 -- Evaluating and monitoring the impact of Local Area Coordination 34 -- NDIA expected outcomes of Local Area Coordination 34 -- Measuring Local Area Coordination outcomes for the NDIA 35 -- BSL Key Performance Indicators 35 --Regular independent evaluation 36 -- The power of stories 36 -- List of References 37 -- Useful websites 37Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission re Current Scheme Implementation and Forecasting for the NDIS / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley | Hall, Susan.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 2 p. PDF.Other title: Submission to Joint Standing Committee re Current Scheme Implementation and Forecasting for the NDIS | [Submission to] Committee Secretary. Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) welcomes the opportunity to contribute to this inquiry, drawing on our work with people with disability as well our experience as an NDIS Partner in the Community deliveringLocal Area Coordination and Early Childhood Early Intervention services since 2016. BSL notes the broad nature of the terms of reference (ToR) for this submission. Each aspect of the ToRaddresses parts of the Scheme where comprehensive performance data is not made public. This lack ofavailable data limits the community’s ability to adequately address key issues of Scheme performance. Weare therefore unable to provide a robust response to the Inquiry’s ToR. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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