Brotherhood of St Laurence

BSL Research reports

This list contains 263 titles

| Select titles to:
`No child -' : child poverty in Australia. /

by McClelland, Alison | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2000Description: iv, 74 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: April 2000 Includes bibliographical references (p. 67-74) This report was commissioned by the Children's Task Force, chaired by the Hon. Alistair Nicholson, Chief Justice, Family Court of AustraliaSummary: Draws on previous research by the Brotherhood of St Laurence and others during the 1980s and 1990s to detail the extent, incidence and impact of child poverty on Australian society. In addition to discussing the work of academic and social policy analysts in Australia and overseas, the report examines the effects of government taxation policy on inequality and provides proposals to redress child poverty.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
'I'm a person not a job!' : establishing core competencies for Change in Brotherhood of St Laurence Residential Aged Care

by Ramcharan, Paul | David, Christina | Jones, Martyn | Moors, Rosetta.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic RMIT University. Centre for Applied Social Research 2015Description: x, 40 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: A study for the BSL–RMIT TRACS (Training and Research in Aged Care Services) partnership project.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Core Competencies for Change in BSL Residential Aged Care was one of the five studies that made up the research program of the BSL/RMIT Teaching and Research in Aged Care Services (TRACS) ‘Sumner House1 Centre of Excellence’ project (2012–2014). The study sought to identify core competencies for excellence in aged care which would drive change in how care is delivered and so enhance the lives of Sumner House residents. The research was constructed to find consensus on the core competencies for high quality care and support among four stakeholder groups – residents, their families and friends, BSL aged care managers and Sumner House direct care staff. The results can be used by staff to adapt their service delivery and supports, by management to adapt policies and procedures, by residents in making claims of the service and by educational establishments in developing courses which reflect the competencies identified by four working groups.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
"I have had a past and I suppose I have a future, but ..." : a report to the Aged and Community Care Team, Brotherhood of St Laurence. /

by Nunkoosing, Karl | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Cook, Kay.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2006Description: vii, 27 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2006 Bibliography: p. 26-27Summary: Two researchers from Deakin University explored ageing in the city , through biographical interviews with twelve older or frail people who were clients of the Brotherhood s aged and community care services. They found that there were often complex connections between people s poverty, their precarious or problematic relationships, insecure or unsafe housing and ageing bodies and failing health.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
10 strategies for improving employment outcomes for people with disability / Andrew Thies, Deborah Warr, Shelley Mallett and Diane Brown (RPC)

by Thies, Andrew | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Warr, Deborah | Mallett, Shelley | Brown, Diane.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 30 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: At a glance: We identify 10 intersecting strategies that will drive systemic change to improve employment outcomes for people with disability in employment. Dive deeper: The next two years are critical for improving employment outcomes for people with disability, as government is overhauling multi-billion dollar employment systems. In addition, the economic aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and structural changes to Australia’s labour market will put extra pressure on jobseekers facing disadvantage, including people with disability. In this report we build on evidence examined by the Brotherhood St. Laurence (BSL) in collaboration with the Disability and Health Unit at the University of Melbourne and BSL’s long experience in developing, delivering and evaluating labour market programs for people vulnerable to economic and social exclusion. The report offers a blueprint to guide government reforms to multiple systems that shape the employment opportunities of people with disability. The 10 strategies are: 1. Shift community attitudes towards people with disability 2. Develop national goals and evaluation mechanisms to track progress 3. Create agile funding structures and mechanisms that support person-centred employment policy 4. Implement an expansive stewardship role for government 5. Adopt a place-centred approach to employment while enabling wider opportunities 6. Design policies that promote mainstream employment 7. Integrate complementary social supports into employment programs for young people with disability 8. Use customised approaches to employment placement and support for both employers and employees 9. Support interagency collaboration 10. Promote the sustainability of the disability support workforce through ongoing training and enhancing job security These are not exhaustive of strategies that could support people with disability to thrive in employment. They should be understood as a web of interacting initiatives. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
A brief reprieve? : financial wellbeing after the 2020 COVID-19 lockdowns / Emily Porter and Dina Bowman (RPC)

by Porter, Emily | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Bowman, Dina.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 28 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: At a glance: Our analysis of Roy Morgan Single Source Survey data showed that during the low-COVID period (October 2020 to March 2021) that followed the 2020 peak of the crisis, there was no ‘snap-back’ for people on the lowest incomes. As government supports such as the Coronavirus Supplement were gradually withdrawn, many people were plunged (back) into poverty. Workers in affected industries continued to face challenges making ends meet, with employment and work-hours remaining below the pre-COVID level. Many who had drawn upon savings or taken on debt to get through the crisis faced a long rebuilding process to get back to their pre-crisis financial position. Dive deeper: Our paper explores financial wellbeing trends for vulnerable Australians after the 2020 COVID lockdowns, as the economy reopened and government supports were reduced. We also consider how prepared these groups were for a second crisis, particularly one with more limited government assistance, given the resurgence of COVID-19 in mid-2021. We use ANZ's Financial Wellbeing Indicator, which draws on multiple questions in the continuous Roy Morgan Single Source survey. The Indicator brings together three dimensions based on Kempson and colleagues’ (2017) model of financial wellbeing. These include the ability to meet everyday commitments, feeling comfortable about one’s financial situation and resilience to financial shocks. As Australia emerged from the 2020 lockdowns, many experienced a time of optimism and hope. However, the impact on financial wellbeing was far from over, particularly for social security recipients as the Coronavirus Supplement was wound back: Unemployed people who were likely to be receiving JobSeeker reported a 19% fall in their Meeting Commitments scores from the high-COVID period (March 2020 to September 2020). Meeting Commitments scores for single parents not in employment fell by a substantial 17% in the low-COVID period, leaving their scores around 50% lower than the Australian average. And there was still no respite for low-income workers struggling to make ends meet: Workers in the lowest 40% of households by income continued to face challenges meeting commitments, with scores for this dimension 10% below their pre-COVID level. The decline was even larger for workers in the bottom 20% of households by income: their average Meeting Commitments scores were 19% lower than pre-COVID. These short-term effects are likely to leave long-term scars. Low-income Australians who took on increased debt and drew down on superannuation are likely to face a long rebuilding process, as wages grow slowly and housing costs remain high. The lockdowns of 2021 can be expected to add to these challenges. As economies again reopen, the report highlights the need for continued government support as people rebuild their financial wellbeing. In the longer term, government needs to protect people from risk by investing in: a decent social safety net that protects against shocks ; investment in full employment to provide secure work and wage growth ; social infrastructure to support future growth. This report is part of the Financial Lives in Uncertain Times project. The research was made possible by the generous support of ANZ through the ANZ Tony Nicholson Fellowship and the provision under licence of Roy Morgan Single Source Survey data. ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
A conversation that never stops : an indicative study of the Parents As Career Transitions Support program

by Borlagdan, Joseph | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Peyton, Kyle.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2014Description: 6 p. PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: PACTS, a program helping parents to support their children?s decision making and choices about career pathways and relevant training, was developed by the Brotherhood and has since been adapted by others.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
A path to re-engagement : evaluating the first year of a Community VCAL education program for young people

by Myconos, George | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: viii, 47 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Summary Notes: Includes "A path to re-engagement : evaluating the first year of a Community VCAL education program for young people : research summary."Summary: In Frankston, the Brotherhood of St Laurence has developed a Community VCAL program tailored for young people aged 15 to 18 who have experienced barriers to mainstream education. Students undertake the Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning - a Years 11 and 12 course which combines classroom tuition with vocational training and work placements - in a community setting rather than in a school. The evaluation of the inaugural year found that, notwithstanding some challenges, the program made a significant difference to the educational opportunities of most of its students. ; VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING (VCAL)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
A positive influence : equipping parents to support young people's career transitions : evaluation of the PACTS program

by Bedson, Lois | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Perkins, Daniel.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2006Description: 33 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2006 Bibliography: p. 33Summary: This is the final evaluation of PACTS (Parents As Career Transition Supports), an innovative Brotherhood pilot project that aims to empower parents to better support their children's transition from school to work and/or further education by building their knowledge of post-school pathways and the contemporary job market. The study found clear benefits to parents, including providing relevant information and skills, addressing their concerns and fostering communication with children about career options, but also noted that the recruitment of parents to the program was resource-intensive.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
A preliminary evaluation of the Short Break Stay Program : respite care for people with dementia

by Mercieca, Monica | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Kimberley, Helen.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2013Description: 4 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Short Break Stay program was established to offer people with advanced dementia a three-day stay in a homelike setting attended by staff especially trained to communicate closely with their carers and thereby replicate preferences and established home routines. This study found that this innovative response to carer needs, designed and delivered by Brotherhood Retirement and Ageing Services with financial support from the Commonwealth Respite Centre, provided real support and reassurance for carers and care recipients alike.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
A shared journey: insights from the Banksia Younger Onset Dementia Support Group

by Wickramasinghe, Seuwandi | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Carr, Ashley | Kimberley, Helen.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Melbourne Brotherhood of St Laurence 2015Description: 28 p. PDF.Online Access: Report | Summary Notes: Seuwandi Wickramasinghe and Ashley Carr are Research Officers, and Dr Helen Kimberley is Senior Manager, in the Retirement and Ageing transition team of the Brotherhood’s Research and Policy centre.Summary: This study of the Banksia Younger Onset Dementia Support Group, a pilot program to support people with younger onset dementia in the Frankston area of outer Melbourne, found that the participants valued being involved in choosing and organising activities that they find meaningful and enjoyable, and having the chance to share their experience with others.The Brotherhood of St Laurence’s Banksia Younger Onset Dementia (YOD) Support Group in Frankston, Victoria, was created in 2013 in response to an identified gap in services. Funded by the HACC (Home and Community Care) Growth Fund, the pilot project recognises that the social and personal needs of younger people with dementia and their carers are distinct from their older counterparts, because of their stage in life when dementia is diagnosed. Moving away from conventional ‘professional’ service provision, the Support Group recognises members as individuals with expert knowledge stemming from their personal experiences of dementia. It assists them to initiate, plan and engage in activities, maintain social links and raise awareness of YOD in the community. This summary reports on an evaluation that used a Participatory Action Research approach to assess how well the Support Group had achieved the following short-term outcomes (first 12 months): • members’ participation in activities that are aligned with their interests • established links with the local community and use of local community support • increased number of members • established links with relevant agencies and services • slowing progression of dementia and delaying residential care • a documented model of social and personal support that is transferable across other YOD specific Planned Activity Group (PAG) programsAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
A taste for learning : evaluating a pre-Community VCAL program

by Myconos, George | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2010Description: viii, 28 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 27-28Summary: This report evaluates a pre-Community VCAL 'Taster' course offered at the Brotherhood of St Laurence's Frankston High Street Centre. The course engaged young people who were seriously disaffected with mainstream secondary school education, and who were facing their transition to adulthood without having acquired important skills. It provided valuable literacy, numeracy, vocational and social skills tuition, as well as the experience these students needed to make judgments about continuing vocational or further education. ; VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING (VCAL)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Access for growth : services for mothers and babies. /

by Gilley, Tim | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1993Description: 70 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Melbourne 1993.; First in series of reports from Life Chances of Children Study. Second is 'What chance a job' (rec. no. B5684) and third 'Beyond the city' (rec. no.B6195).Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Addressing the challenges together : consultations with Brotherhood clients : research summary /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: July 2011 This is a summary of a longer, unpublished report prepared by Sharon Bond and Michael Horn for an internal Brotherhood audience.Summary: This summary of a longer unpublished report outlines the client consultations that the Brotherhood undertook to help inform its 2012-14 strategic review. Focus groups - and a short survey - were conducted with five groups of Brotherhood clients, including teenagers, parents, refugees/migrants, jobseekers and older clients. Recommendations from these clients covered a range of areas from improving access to quality doctors in the outer suburbs, increasing availability of social activities programs to offering refugee-specific services through Job Network Australia providers.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Adequacy and equity in retirement incomes : submission to the Strategic Review of Pensions Income and Assets Tests. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1994Description: 11 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 1994Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Adjusting to Consumer Directed Care : the experience of Brotherhood of St Laurence community aged care service users

by Simons, Bonnie | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Kimberley, Helen | McColl Jones, Nicky.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2016Description: vi, 22 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: May 2016 Summary: Australia’s approach to aged care provision to support people living in their own home has recently undergone radical change. At the core of the reform is the concept of self-directed care, which offers aged care clients individual choice and control of their government-subsidised Home Care Packages. The framework for the changes is Consumer Directed Care (CDC), which is defined as: ... a way of delivering services that allows consumers to have greater control over their own lives by allowing them to make choices about the types of care and services they access and the delivery of those services, including who will deliver the services and when (DSS 2014, p. 7). The transition to CDC commenced on 1 August 2013. All new Home Care Packages were mandated for delivery under the CDC framework from 1 July 2014, and all existing packages from 1 July 2015. A proprietary BSL model was developed for the delivery of services under the CDC framework. The model offers consumers a choice of three levels of autonomy, which define the amount of consumer self-management and which influence the total amount of money available to purchase services. A formative evaluation of the BSL model and the BSL transition to CDC was conducted by the BSL Research and Policy Centre Inclusive Ageing team using an action research approach that tracked the challenges faced during the transition and their resolution. This report focuses on the CDC experience of BSL Home Care Package consumers and their adjustment to the new model of service delivery under the Consumer Directed Care framework. Interviews with consumers and carers explored their understanding of CDC and the BSL model of delivery, the suitability and adequacy of information provided to them, the impact of the new arrangements on the services they received and activities they accessed, and their attitudes to the introduction of individual budgets and monthly financial statements. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Aged care policy and programs : a literature review. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1994Description: 30 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Review of services for older people no. 1 April 1994 2 copiesAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
All in it together? : financial wellbeing before COVID-19 / Emily Porter, Dina Bowman and Matthew Curry (RPC)

by Porter, Emily | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Curry, Matthew | Bowman, Dina.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 28 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Our analysis of Roy Morgan Single Source Survey data showed that financial wellbeing in Australia improved in the two years before the COVID-19 crisis, but not all groups experienced the same improvements. At a glance In the two years up to March 2020, unemployed workers, single parents, disability pensioners, young people and renters did not share the overall improvement in financial wellbeing. Dive deeper In this first paper in a series on financial wellbeing in Australia we explore patterns and trends in the two years prior to the COVID-19 crisis, We identify where structural barriers limit the ability of vulnerable groups to improve their financial wellbeing and build long-term economic security. We use ANZ's Financial Wellbeing Indicator, which draws on multiple questions in the continuous Roy Morgan Single Source Survey. The Indicator brings together three dimensions based on Kempson and colleagues’ (2017) model of financial wellbeing: • respondents’ ability to meet everyday commitments • how financially secure they feel • and their resilience to negative shocks. Each survey respondent is scored from 0 to 100 for each dimension, and the average of the three scores is reported as the overall Financial Wellbeing Indicator score. Our analysis of the two-year period to March 2020 highlighted unequal patterns in financial wellbeing, including: • Increases in the ability to Meet Commitments were stronger among higher income households, with an average improvement of almost 7%, than among lower income households (just under 4%). • Unemployed workers spent almost 90% of their income on living expenses, leaving limited scope for saving. • In contrast to every other household type (coupled parents, couples and single adults), Financial Wellbeing scores for single parents declined, by 6%. •Among Disability Support Pensioners Financial Wellbeing scores decreased, driven by a sharp 21% decline in their ability to Meet Commitments. • Among young people (aged 18 to 29), Feeling Comfortable scores declined by 4%, though overall Financial Wellbeing increased by 4%. • Renters continued to experience weaker financial wellbeing, with scores around 30% lower than home owners and 15% below those with mortgages. This report is part of the Financial Lives in Uncertain Times project. The research was made possible by the generous support of ANZ through the ANZ Tony Nicholson Fellowship and the provision under licence of Roy Morgan Single Source Survey data. ; December 2020 Includes bibliographical references. ; Contents : Summary -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Inequality and insecurity before COVID 19 -- 3 Financial choices and wellbeing -- 4 Data and approach to analysis -- 5 Findings : Before the COVID-19 crisis, overall financial wellbeing in Australia was increasing, but not for everyone ; Why are some Australian falling behind when it comes to financial wellbeing? --- 6 Responding to the crisis and creating financial wellbeing for all -- References Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
All our children: children's entitlements to health, education and community services /

by Harris, Patricia | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1990Description: 61 p. Bibliography: p. 55-61.Other title: Child poverty policy review ; 4.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The children of Australia are divided by the distribution of Income and "wealth, by deep-seated and enduring cultural differences, by geographical distance and regional inequalities. Such differences have produced entrenched inequalities and led to the abrogation of many children's rights to good quality health, education and community services. The factors that divide children are exacerbated by the practices and institutions of government: federalism and its tensions, problems of co-ordination, centralised bureaucracies said to be distant from the people they are supposed to serve, and the lack of representation of the most economically, socially and culturally "oppressed groups. This paper analyses these divisions and identifies the general policies that are needed if all children's rights to good qualify health, education and community services are to be met. In essence, the paper argues for a consolidation and expansion of the services for children provided by government. It shows how 'the public provision of universally available health, education and community services is' necessary to ensure that all children share in the same spectrum of opportunities and that the consequences of economic and geographic inequality are counteracted Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Anthroposalata unlimited : possibilities for connecting community in Frankston. The Torch Project community consultation for the High Street multi-purpose centre

by Jope, Sally | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2005Description: iv, 16 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2005 Bibliography : p. 16Summary: The development of a multi-purpose centre in the Uniting Church complex at High Street Frankston has enabled the Brotherhood of St Laurence to explore ways to facilitate community participation. This report documents the process by which The Torch Project engaged with people in Frankston, including the development of Anthroposalata Unlimited, a cultural celebration reflecting local understandings of identity, history and social issues, and consultation about visions for the use of the High Street site.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Appendices to: The early years : consultation with providers of early childhood services in the Melbourne municipalities of Yarra, Hume and Moreland

by Rogers, Rosemary | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Martin, Jenny.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence and Centre for Community Child Health 2002Description: p.103-150.Other title: Early years : consultation with providers of early childhood services in the Melbourne municipalities of Yarra, Hume and Moreland: appendices .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: This is the published version of an unpublished research report produced in November 2001. ; See The early years : consultation with providers of early childhood services in the Melbourne municpalities of Yarra, Hume and Moreland. rec no. [B11222] Phase two of the Early Years Project Website : http://www.bsl.org.auAvailability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
 <<  <  1  2  3  ...  14    >>

Hosted by Prosentient