Brotherhood of St Laurence

HIPPY

This list contains 56 titles

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A review of the early childhood literature /

by Centre for Community Child Health.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. AusInfo 2000Description: iv, 39 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2000 Includes bibliographical references Prepared for the Department of Family and Community Services as a background paper for the National Families Strategy.Availability: (1)
As small as Sam /

by Hutchins, Elizabeth | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence and HIPPY Australia 2004Description: 22 p. : ill. (chiefly col.).Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Illustrated by Anne Ryan A black dog book 2 copiesAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2), BSL Archives (1).
Changes in Victorian schools and implications for lower-income families : submission to the Public Inquiry into Public Education. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 1999Description: 10 leaves.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 20 May 1999Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Changing children's trajectories : results of the HIPPY Longitudinal Study / Julie Connolly & Shelley Mallett (BSL.RPC)

by Connolly, Julie | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St. Laurence, 2020Description: 69 p. : . ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The most comprehensive study to date has investigated the impact of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) on the Australian children and parents who take part. At a glance The Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) is an early learning and parenting program targeting four and five-year-old children in low-income households. It provides parents with the confidence, knowledge and tools to support their child's education and helps them create a home learning environment. Doing HIPPY improves their child's school readiness and parent–child relationships. Key findings include: •Not only did parents enjoy the program; they transformed the home learning environment and spent more time on learning activities with their children •At commencement, HIPPY children on average scored below the Australian mean on a test of literacy and numeracy. After completing HIPPY, children’s average score was above the relevant Australian mean. •Their improvement suggests HIPPY leads to a changed learning trajectory for children, not just a developmental gain that might be expected with age. •In this way HIPPY works to redress the negative impact of poverty and financial hardship on child development. Dive deeper Delivered in over 100 Australian communities facing socioeconomic disadvantage, HIPPY is an integrated parenting support and early learning program that works to increase parents’ confidence as their child’s first teacher and to reconfigure the home learning environment in order to improve children’s school readiness. The HIPPY Longitudinal Study found a strong theoretical and empirical foundation for the program design. Parents were successfully engaged, indicating high levels of satisfaction with key aspects of the program. They actively reconfigured the home learning environment using HIPPY’s distinctive pedagogical practices and activities. Attending HIPPY group meetings helped parents improve their child learning outcomes. Close to program commencement, the average performance of HIPPY children on a test of literacy and numeracy skills was below the Australian mean. After completing HIPPY, on average, HIPPY children performed above the relevant Australian mean. This suggests a changed learning trajectory, not just a developmental gain, indicating that HIPPY works to redress the negative impact of poverty and financial hardship on child development. The HLS also revealed a subset of families who face additional challenges owing to their complex circumstances. This suggests opportunities for adaptation and extra support during the transition to school. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Children's Voices Listening Tour : 2019 / Sharon Sparks (HIPPY) (BSL)

by Sparks, Sharon | HIPPY Australia | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : HIPPY Australia, [2020.]; Copyright © 2020Description: [9 p.] : ill. PDF.Online Access: Children's Voices Listening Tour 2019 Summary: HIPPY (Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters) is a two year, home-based early learning and parenting program for four and five year olds that empowers parents to be their child’s first teacher. With the support of Tutors, parents teach a structured 60 week curriculum of educational and behavioural activities to their child in the family home and attend group meetings. HIPPY is delivered in 100 communities across Australia. With Australian Government support, the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL), together with local partner organisations, delivers HIPPY to vulnerable children and families; provides local jobs and skill development; and strengthens communities.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Children's Voices Listening Tour : 2019 final report / Sharon Sparks, Sara Sterling, John Hartshorn.(BSL) (HIPPY)

by Sparks, Sharon | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Sterling, Sara | Hartshorn, John | HIPPY Australia.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, [2020.]; Copyright © Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: [19 p.] : ill. PDF.Online Access: Children's Voices Listening Tour 2019 (final report) Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence recognises the importance of listening and incorporating children’s voices into the design and delivery of children and family services and programs. In 2015, BSL commenced a ground-breaking investigation into approaches to listening to children’s voice through its early learning and parenting program–HIPPY (Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters). This report details the findings from the second Children’s Listening Tour in 2019. Using new action research techniques and theory, the 2019 Tour captured the thoughts, perceptions and comments of 188 HIPPY children from 15 diverse HIPPY communities as well as insights from 159 parents who teach their child HIPPY; CONTENTS: 01 Introduction 7 -- 02 Background 8 -- 03 Site Selection 10 -- 04 Demographics 12 -- 05 Methodology How We Planned It 16 -- 06 Parent/Carer Survey And Discussion Group 18 -- 07 Ethics How We Made Sure We Did It The Right Way 19 -- 08 Data Analysis How We Knew We Were Drawing The Right Conclusions 20 -- 09 What We Heard From Children 22 --10 Drawing Activity In Focus 28 -- 11 What We Heard From Parents 30 -- 12 Conclusion And Recommendations 34Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Commonly used assessment and screening instruments /

by Black, Marsha | Powell, Diane.

Publisher: unpub. 2004Description: Word.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2004 Prepared for HIPPY USASummary: The information provided here should be useful for understanding the strengths, limitations, and appropriate uses of the instruments described. It can also be used to understand issues involved in the assessment and testing of young children in general and to educate stakeholders about these issues so that programs are not forced to use child assessment instruments in inappropriate ways.Availability: (1)
Dropping Off the Edge : the distribution of disadvantage in Australia. /

by Vinson, Tony | Jesuit Social Services.

Publisher: Richmond, Melbourne Jesuit Social Services 2007Description: xviii, 110 p.: ill., maps col. PDF.Other title: DOTE.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Report of Jesuit Social Services and Catholic Social Services Australia. Includes bibliographical references and index. 2 copies c. 2 HIPPYSummary: "The level of social disadvantage in Australian society has been one of the hotly debated areas of social policy in recent years. The tempo of that debate will increase in the coming months, as our nation moves closer to a federal election in the second half of 2007. ; This research investigation completed by Emeritus Professor Tony Vinson on behalf of Jesuit Social Services and Catholic Social Services Australia offers documented evidence that can help ground that debate and take it beyond different political affiliations and perspectives. ; Using data provided by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the Australian Taxation Office, Centrelink and the Australian Health Insurance Commission, and a broad range of departments from each of the state and territory governments, Professor Vinson has produced a map that can only assist federal, state and local governments to better grapple with the reality, often hidden from our eyes..."(Website)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Early childhood case studies /

by Rogers, Rosemary | Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care (SNAICC).

Publisher: Northcote, Vic. Secretariat for National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care 2004Description: 49 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)
Early childhood education & care : future directions

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2017Description: [15 p.] PDF.Other title: Early childhood education and care : future directions .Notes: June 2017; Includes: Attachment: The Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY), pp.12-14 Attachment: Growing Learners for 0-3 year olds and their parents, pp. 15Summary: Thank you for the opportunity to input into the ALP’s review of early childhood education and care (ECEC). We are pleased that Labor is looking to shake up Australia’s ECEC system. Your paper reflects the centrality of early education and its enduring impact on a child’s subsequent life chances - at school, in the workforce, in relationships and in the broader community. It also recognises the strong dividends associated with improved early education and care experiences for children experiencing disadvantage. The Brotherhood’s contribution to this review is motivated by the well-known link between childhood vulnerability and lifelong disadvantage. We believe a well-designed early childhood system, of which ECEC is an integral part, would actively prevent and address vulnerabilities in early childhood before they accumulate and escalate over a person's life course. Our vision is for a system that breaks the cycle of intergenerational disadvantage that some children are born into, and severs the nexus between their family’s socio-economic circumstances, where they grow up, and their early childhood outcomes. We want to see a systemic response that gives all children growing up in Australia a good start in life. The first part of this submission outlines broad themes relevant to your review. The second briefly addresses some of the specific questions posed in your paper. Availability: BROTHERHOOD STAFF PLEASE SEE LIBRARY FOR ELECTRONIC COPY (1)
Early days, much promise : an evaluation of the Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) in Australia

by Gilley, Tim | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2003Description: vi, 22 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: November 2003 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: This paper reports the evaluation of a program designed to improve children's educational attainment and self-esteem in the early years of school, by equipping and supporting parents to undertake lessons with their four and five-year-old children at home. It describes the program's implementation in the multicultural environment of inner suburban Melbourne, the views of participating staff and parents and the outcomes for children. Learnings to inform futures programs are also identified. ; This paper reports the evaluation of a program designed to improve children's educational attainment and self-esteem in the early years of school, by equipping and supporting parents to undertake lessons with their four and five-year-old children at home. It describes the program's implementation in the multicultural environment of inner suburban Melbourne, the views of participating staff and parents and the outcomes for children. Learnings to inform futures programs are also identified. ; HOME INTERACTION PROGRAM FOR PARENTS AND YOUNGSTERS (HIPPY)Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Early years : position paper

by Szirom, Tricia | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2017Description: v,32 p. PDF.Other title: Early years.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: February 2017; Members of the Early Years Transition Leadership Team involved in the development of this Position Paper : Marian Pettit, National Manager HIPPY (Chair) Dr. Tricia Szirom, General Manager, Children, Youth and Families Rob Hudson, Group General Manager, Programs and Policy Dr. Shelley Mallet, General Manager, Research and Policy Centre Josh Badenoch, Youth and Family Services Team Leader Elise Willersdorf, Senior Manager, Programs and Performance, HIPPY Australia Melinda Moore, Senior Advisor, Planning and Projects, HIPPY Australia Suzie Mansell, Senior Manager, Craigieburn and Hume Carol I’Anson, Senior Manager, Connie Benn Community Team Emma Antonetti, Manager Community Impact, Mernda Growth Corridor Project Nicole Rees, Senior Manager, Policy Dr. Eric Dommers, Senior Manager, Inclusive Education, Research and Policy CentreSummary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence is committed to addressing poverty in Australia and to finding the most effective points at which to provide support. Increasing evidence from all parts of the world, along with our own experience, shows that the earlier an intervention is made in a child’s life, the greater the long-term impact will be on the individual, family and community. The overall mission of the Brotherhood is to deliver services, develop policy and support social change through empowerment, capacity building and initiatives which support individuals and communities. For this reason we are committed to ensuring that all children have a fair start in life. Historically we have given particular attention in our early years work to early intervention, creating solutions through community engagement, empowering families and supporting children. Our current programs reflect this focus and our more recent developments build on this, reinforced by the most recent evidence from research and practice. Our work with children in the early years is focused on the 0–6 years cohort although this may differ depending on the intervention. Section two of this document sets out the context for our Early Years program, and describes the pathways to success and risk factors for social exclusion. Section three describes our current Early Years programs and their rationale. Section four outlines our integrated approach of working with both children and families that is being piloted at the Jindi Child and Family Centre and Hothlyn Drive in Melbourne’s outer growth corridors and at the Connie Benn Centre in Fitzroy, and section five outlines the team’s future directions. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Education and social inclusion : submission to the Victorian Government's Review of Education and Training legislation. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2005 Summary: In this submission, the Brotherhood of St Laurence focuses on issues that relate to social inclusion and education and that have been drawn from our research and service experience. A key role of education and training is to promote social inclusion in our society. Performance of the education system and individual schools should be assessed by how well they include rather than exclude students.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Engaging children's voices in the early years : practice guidelines / Sharon Sparks (BSL) (HIPPY)

by Sparks, Sharon | Brotherhood of St Laurence | HIPPY Australia.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2020; Copyright © Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 43 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Children’s human rights and voice must be considered in the development and implementation of programs that will effect their lives and opportunities. Both internationally and in Australia, conventions, laws and frameworks mandate that the rights, agency and voice of children be heard. The Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) is committed to ensuring the voice of the child is heard and respected in operational practice and in the deliver of services and programs involving or impacting on them. Since 2016, BSL has focussed on engagement with children to improve service delivery and outcomes for children and families. The aim of this guide is to provide best practice principles to ensure that the practice of listening to children is embedded into BSL programs. BSL is also seeking to encourage other children and family programs to use this guide to ensure children have agency, their voices are heard and influence on operational practice. ‘Children are key informants and experts on their own lives and, indeed, are our best source of advice for matters affecting them.’ (MacNaughton, Smith & Laurence, 2003). This guide will provide a framework that outlines the steps required to meaningfully engage with young children. It will also provide practical tips and tools to embed children’s voices and child agency in your program. [Introduction] ; The author of this report, and creator of the Engagement framework is Sharon Sparks. BSL also acknowledges the leadership of Sharon Sparks in developing the BSL’s Voice of the Child practice over the past four years. The HIPPY Australia Team within the BSL and the HIPPY Network is supporting this action research. Includes bibliographical references. ; CONTENTS: 01 INTRODUCTION: 1a. United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) (1989). 6 -- 1b. Belonging, Being and Becoming: The Early Years Learning Framework (ELYF) for Australia (DEEWR, 2009) 6 -- 1c. National Quality Standards in Early Childhood Education and Care 7 --- 1d. State legislation and National child safety principles (Australian Human Rights Commission, 2018) 7 -- 02 ENGAGING CHILDREN’S VOICES: WHY IT’S IMPORTANT: What is agency? 9 -- Why we engage 9 -- Agency and participation 9 -- Treseder -- Degrees of participation 10 -- Lundy’s model of participation 11 -- Ethical considerations 12 -- Duty of care 13 --Transparent process 13 -- Voluntary participation 13 -- Inclusivity and cultural considerations 13 -- Relevant participation 14 --Safe (environment and risk sensitive) 14 -- Creating a safe environment 14 -- Privacy 14 -- 03 FRAMEWORK FOR ENGAGING CHILDREN’S VOICES: Plan 18 -- Train 20 -- Engage 22 -- Analyse 25 --Recommendations 26 -- Feedback and implementation 27 -- 04 ENGAGING WITH CHILDREN TOOLKIT: HIPPY toolkit 30 -- Recruitment 30 -- Tutor training 31 -- Home visits 32 -- Group meetings 33 -- Quality assurance 34 --Templates for feedback 35 -- Appendix A: Feedback from your child: home visits template 36 -- Appendix B: Survey for families 37 -- Appendix C: Survey for children 38 -- Appendix D: What should I do if a child discloses? 39 -- 05 CONCLUSION 41 -- 06 REFERENCES 43Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Enhancing learning in early childhood within disadvantaged families: Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters /

by Webb, Jill | Gilley, Tim | Mutimer, Annette.

Publisher: unpub. 1999Description: 21p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p.21-22)Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Enhancing learning in early childhood within the family : evaluation of practice and theory in a multi-cultural context. /

by Gilley, Tim.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Victoria University 2002Description: 267 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts Victoria Uruversity August 2002Summary: Enhancing learning in early childhood within the family. This thesis provides an analysis of a particular approach to enhancing learning in early childhood within the family. It involves an evaluation of practice and theory in an educationally disadvantaged and multi-cultural community. The Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) has a 30 year history and was introduced into Australia in 1998 by the Brotherhood of St Laurence. It is a two-year intensive program with four and five-year-old children and their families. Current understanding of the importance of learning in the early years, and intensive adult-child communication, explain why programs such as HIPPY which engage parents as teachers of the young children can be effective. Early learning experiences are at home. Later programs in school often appear to be inadequate to redress early disadvantage because they intervene too late and lack the resources to provide the necessary adult-to-child input. The research reported here was an evaluation of the second intake of 33 children (32 families) into HIPPY in Australia. A triangulation research method involved (a) participant observation of the program, (b) interviews with stakeholders, and (c) an assessment of children in the program and in a matched comparison group. Direct testing and teacher assessment of children was undertaken in the areas of general development, literacy, numeracy and school behaviour during the children's first and second years of schooling. The research findings indicated that the program was well implemented at a number of different levels and that the overseas model can be successfully implemented in multi-cultural Australian conditions. The approach to the diverse language backgrounds of families was a major area of successful adaptation from the standard model. Both qualitative and quantitative data analysis indicated that the program enhanced children's school progress. The study identified lessons for future evaluation studies of the program in Australia. The research findings indicate an encouraging start for HIPPY in Australia. In broader terms, the study points to the potential importance to disadvantaged children of well implemented home-based early childhood education programs.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Evaluating the effectiveness of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) / [journal article]

by Barnett, Tony | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Roost, Fatoumata Diallo | McEachran, Juliet.

Edition: Family Matters no. 91 pp. 27-37Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2012Description: 11 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: This paper uses unit record data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is conducted in partnership between the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA), the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The findings and views reported in this paper are those of the authors and should not be attributed to FaHCSIA, AIFS or the ABS.Summary: Children living in disadvantaged areas are vulnerable to developmental delay. In 2009, the Australian Government commenced the rollout of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) to 50 socially disadvantaged communities across Australia. HIPPY aims to support parents in their role as their four-year-old child’s first teacher, so that their child starts school on an equal footing to that of their more advantaged peers. A two-year quasi-experimental research design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of HIPPY. A propensity score matching technique was used to identify a matched control group from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Positive effects were found across a number of important developmental domains and spheres of influence, including the child’s cognitive ability and social-emotional adjustment, the parent’s self-efficacy and parenting style, the home learning environment, and the parents’ social connectedness and inclusion. Currently, HIPPY operates as a targeted place-based initiative. But, if the program is to have an impact on reducing social inequalities in child school readiness at the population level, it will need to reach the majority of parents and vulnerable children who are in need of more support and be linked to a universal early childhood education and care platform.Availability: (1)
Evaluation of the 2014-15 Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) Program : approved report of the Department of Evaluation and Assessment

by Palladino, Dianne K.

Publisher: [Dallas, Tex] Dallas Independent School District 2015Description: vii, 50 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Evaluation of the 2014-15 Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) Program : Department of Evaluation and Assessment.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: August 2015 EA15-178-2Summary: Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) is a home visitation program for parents of three-, four-, and five-year-olds that involves parents as their child’s first teacher. HIPPY partners with parents to prepare their children for success in school. As stated in the HIPPY Theory of Change (Appendix A), “The mission of HIPPY programs is to empower parents as primary educators of their children in the home and foster parent involvement in school and community life to maximize the chances of successful early school experiences.” The goal of HIPPY in Dallas Independent School District (ISD) is to serve families within the district according to the HIPPY model, increase the self-efficacy of parents to teach children, and ultimately help children within the district to become better prepared for school. Originating in Israel in 1969, HIPPY is now active in 14 countries, including 139 sites in 23 states in the United States. Twelve HIPPY sites serve families in Texas. The HIPPY program in Dallas is part of the Early Childhood and Community Partnerships department in Dallas ISD. HIPPY Dallas ISD served over 712 families in 2014-15 and expects to maintain that approximate level of enrollment in 2015-16. Guided by the HIPPY model, paid paraprofessional home instructors visited parents weekly over the course of the 30 week program year to deliver curriculum packets and books. Home instructors used role-play to teach the curriculum to the parent in an effort to build the parent’s confidence and teaching skills. The goal of home instructors was to equip the parent to deliver the curriculum to the child. Practicing this set and structured curriculum with the home instructor empowered parents to take the role of their child’s first teacher. Parents were expected to work with their children five days a week for 15 minutes a day. When possible, home instructors were recruited from past HIPPY participants. Because these individuals were members of the community they served, this practice served to cultivate rapport among HIPPY home instructors and families. Availability: (1)
Evaluation of the Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (H.I.P.P.Y)

by Grady, Jacqueline | [Gilley, Tim] | Dean, Suzanne | Fan, Cynthia.

Edition: [unpub.]Publisher: 2002Description: 16 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: This research has been developed in conjunction with H.I.P.P.Y International, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Brotherhood of St Laurence and Deakin University.Summary: The Home Instruction program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) originated in Israel in the late 1960s in response to an observed gap between some children’s skills and the levels of ability and skills needed to achieve and succeed at school. Government assisted research and the efforts of Lombard (1994) and her team of early childhood educationalists at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem developed the program. The main purpose of HIPPY is to assist children, whose parents have low levels of education/low income, to be more successful at school, through fostering children’s cognitive ability and confidence in themselves as learners. It is specifically targeted to families with low levels of education. It main focus is on developing the cognitive, language and fine motor skills. HIPPY is described as a home-based enrichment program which focuses on the parent- child relationship. It is an international program coordinated by HIPPY International (headed by Lombard) and it is being trialed in Australia for the first time by the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) in inner Melbourne. It operates for two years with each family when their child is four to five years of age. It thus covers both the kindergarten year and the first year of school. Three general distinguishing aspects of HIPPY as an early childhood program are its focus on child education, on change within the family and that it works with four and five-old children. The program involves the individual family in a two-year educational program. Key components include the use of pre-set educational materials, home visiting, regular group meetings of parents, seLcting home tutors from the some language and cultural backgrounds as participating families, intensive in service training of home tutors and the use of role play as the method of learning. Overall the program is highly structured making use of educational material produced by HIPPY internationally (Lombard 1994).Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).
Evaluation of the Home Interaction Program for Parents And Youngsters / ACIL Allen Consulting

by ACIL Allen Consulting.

Publisher: [Melbourne,Vic.] : ACIL Allen Consulting, 2018Description: [235 p.] . ill. PDF.Other title: Evaluation of the Home Interaction Program for Parents And Youngsters, Report prepare for the Department of Social Services .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The overall objective of the evaluation was to independently assess the appropriateness, effectiveness, and efficiency of HIPPY in Australia. This included assessing whether the program is achieving its intended outcomes and whether there are more appropriate and efficient ways of achieving these outcomes. Additionally, evaluation readiness materials were prepared to support program delivery and development. - ix; March 2018 Report to Department of Social Services Final report.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
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