Brotherhood of St Laurence

Indigenous children - Early Childhood Education

This list contains 30 titles

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[Child Family Community Australia] Practice guides [Website] / AIFS

by Australian Institute of Family Studies. Child Family Community Australia.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies. 2021Online Access: Practice Guides website Summary: The resources listed on this page have a practice focus, and are designed to assist practitioners, managers and service providers in their work:Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
A critical review of the early childhood literature / Diana Warren, Meredith O'Connor, Diana Smart and Ben Edwards.

by Warren, Diana | O'Connor, Meredith | Smart, Diana | Edwards, Ben | Australia. Department of Education and Training [issuing body.] | Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2016Description: 67 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: October 2016 "This report was commissioned by the Australian Government Department of Education and Training." - Title page verso.Summary: This report reviews the international literature on the benefits of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) for 3 year old children, with a specific focus on what elements of successful programs can be translated to the Australian context. It asks: what evidence is there of the benefits of participation for 3-year olds in preschool programs, how generalisable is this evidence to the Australian setting, does participation disproportionally benefit disadvantaged children, and what evidence is there on benefits of preschool for Indigenous children?Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
A strong start for every Indigenous child / Inge Kral, Lyn Fasoli, Hilary Smith et al. ; OECD

by Kral, Inge | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development | Fasoli, Lyn | Smith Hilary et al.

Publisher: Paris, France : OECD Publishing, 2021Description: 87 p. (Online resource).Online Access: OECD iLibrary (PDF access on website) Summary: This Working Paper was developed to assist policy makers, education and Indigenous leaders, as well as education practitioners, to better support Indigenous children’s early learning and well-being. The paper focuses on early years policies and provision in Aotearoa New Zealand, Australia and Canada. It sets out a synthesis of evidence on children’s early development, with a particular focus on the conditions and approaches that support positive outcomes for Indigenous children. The Working Paper then outlines a set of promising initiatives that seek to create positive early learning environments for Indigenous children. Drawing on the available evidence and promising approaches, the paper presents a framework for strengthening Indigenous children’s early learning and well-being. [Abstract]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education action plan : 2010-2014 /

by Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs.

Publisher: Carlton South, Vic. Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 45Summary: A national plan that commits all governments in Australia to a unified approach to closing the gap in education outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Education Action Plan 2010-2014, was developed by the Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs (MCEECDYA) as part of the Council of Australian Governments' (COAG's) reform agenda to improve life outcomes for indigenous Australians. MCEECDYA approved the plan in April 2010 and it was subsequently endorsed by COAG in May 2011.Availability: (1)
Access to early childhood education in Australia : insights from a qualitative study /

by Hand, Kelly et al | Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2014Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This report explores the factors that affect parents' use of Early Childhood Education (ECE) in Australia. Based on interviews with 94 parents in Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania, and Western Australia, it investigates parents' knowledge of and attitudes towards ECE, how different delivery systems affect participation, the key factors that influence parents, the factors that may support parents' use of ECE, Indigenous families, and parents' views on overcoming barriers to access. In Australia, ECE services are delivered by state and local governments as well as private providers, and are provided in a mix of contexts including kindergartens, standalone preschools, long day care settings, and schools. ; Executive summary -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Background -- 3. Methodology -- 4. Parents' understanding of ECE and what it can offer children -- 5. Barriers to using ECE -- 6. Factors that support the useAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
An exploratory analysis of the longitudinal survey of Indigenous children [electronic resource] / N. Biddle.

by Biddle, Nicholas | Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. : Australian National University, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, 2011Description: viii, 38 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: "The Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC) or Footprints in Time is the first large-scale longitudinal survey in Australia to focus on the development of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) children. The analysis presented in this paper is structured around six research questions using the LSIC: the size and composition of Indigenous children's families and households; how key measures of parental wellbeing are associated with family and household structure and how they change through time; the factors associated with different types of early childhood education attendance; how household characteristics vary across the sample and how they change through time; how self-reported measures of the quality of the community in which a person lives compare with other neighbourhood-level indicators; and how migration is related to self-reported measures of the community and other area-level characteristics. The conclusions from the analysis in this paper are but a small subset of the insights that will emerge from analysis of the LSIC as more researchers make use of it and a greater number of waves and variables become available. Ultimately, in addition to ethically conducted randomised controlled trials, longitudinal databases are arguably the most effective source of data for designing evidence-based policy. One of the greatest contributions of the LSIC (and this paper) may be to demonstrate the feasibility and desirability of having such evidence for all Indigenous Australians, not just children" [taken from abstract]Availability: (1)
CAEPR Indigenous population project 2011 census papers : paper 7 : education : part 1 : early childhood education.

by Biddle, Nicholas | Bath, Jessamy | Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.

Canberra Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, 2012Description: 28 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Includes bibliographical references.Summary: The aim of this paper is to provide an updated description of the level of participation of Indigenous children in early childhood education, as well as an analysis of the differences in outcomes between those children who do and do not attend. The five main conclusions from the census analysis are that: there has been a decline over the last intercensal period in the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children in terms of preschool participation; this decline was mainly due to reductions in the non-Indigenous rates, as well as a change in the geographic distribution of the Indigenous population; despite consistency at the national level there were 26 out of 37 Indigenous Regions that experienced a significant increase in preschool participation; many remote regions are catching up to non-remote regions in rates of participation; large gaps still remain between Indigenous and non-Indigenous children once geography and other characteristics are controlled for. Another major finding from the paper is that although Indigenous children who participated in preschool tend to start school with lower rates of developmental vulnerability than those who did not, there are still very large gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students once preschool is controlled for. Preschool participation is important. However, it alone is not sufficient to ensure all Indigenous children start school in the same position as their non-Indigenous peers. [Abstract]Availability: (1)
Child care and early education in Australia : the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children /

by Harrison, Linda J | Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2009Description: xii, 207 p. ; 30 cm.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Childcare use and its role in Indigenous child development : evidence from the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children in Australia

by Azpitarte, Francisco | Chigavazira, Abraham | Kalb, Guyonne et al.

Publisher: [Parkville, Vic.] : Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, University of Melbourne, 2016Description: 49 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: December 2016 Authors: Francisco Azpitarte, Abraham Chigavazira, Guyonne Kalb, Brad M. Farrant, Francisco Perales and Stephen R. Zubrick.; This paper uses unit record data from the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC). ; Francisco Azpitarte, Henderson Research Fellow, Economist, 2011-2018 Francisco is an economist who joined the Research and Policy Centre in early 2011. He was appointed to the Ronald Henderson Research Fellow joint position at the Melbourne Institute, University of Melbourne and the Brotherhood of St LaurenceSummary: This paper investigates patterns of childcare use and their influence on the cognitive development of Indigenous children. The influence of childcare on the cognitive outcomes of Indigenous children is less well understood than for non-Indigenous children due to a lack of appropriate data. This paper uses data from the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children, a unique panel survey that tracks two cohorts of Indigenous children in Australia. This paper focusses on the younger cohort that has been followed from infancy and includes rich information on their childcare use and cognitive outcomes. We find that, compared to Indigenous children who never participated in childcare, Indigenous children who participated in childcare performed better on a range of cognitive outcomes measured across the preschool years. Using regression and propensity score matching techniques we show that this difference is entirely driven by selection into childcare, with children from more advantaged families being more likely to attend formal childcare than children from less advantaged families. However, results from the matching analysis suggest that relatively disadvantaged children might benefit more from attending childcare, as indicated by the positive potential effects found for those who never attended childcare (i.e. the estimated effects had they participated in childcare).Availability: (1)
Closing the gap of Indigenous disadvantage : progress towards this important goal /

by Russell, Lesley | Menzies Centre for Health Policy | Wenham, Sarah.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. ; Sydney, N.S.W. Menzies Centre for Health Policy 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2010Summary: In the early days of his Prime Ministership, Kevin Rudd committed to 'closing the gap' on Indigenous disadvantage, committing to six ambitious targets: Closing the life expectancy gap within a generation; Halving the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade; Ensuring all Indigenous four year olds in remote communities have access to early childhood education within five years (by 2013); Halving the gap for Indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade (by 2018); At least halving the gap in Indigenous Year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020; and Halving the gap in employment outcomes by 2018. Time is ticking in terms of the self imposed timeframe on several of these targets. It?s not clear how much progress has been made.Availability: (1)
Closing the Gap targets : 2017 analysis of progress and key drivers of change / Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2018Description: xii, 294 p. : ill., map PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: AIHW cat no. IHW 193.; "This report was authored by staff from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) Indigenous and Maternal Health Group."--P. ix.Summary: The Closing the Gap framework by the Council of Australian Governments is a national approach to close the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people. It features 7 agreed targets: early childhood education, school attendance, Year 12 attainment, child mortality, literacy and numeracy, employment, and life expectancy. This report provides current evidence on the progress towards the 7 targets and analyses the underlying key drivers of change. Key themes across the targets and implications for future target setting are also discussed. Note, new data for 6 of the 7 targets have become available since the analyses in this report were finalised. Updated assessments of progress have been noted in the relevant sections but the report has otherwise not been updated. The new data are reported in the 'Closing the Gap Prime Minister's Report 2018.Availability: (1)
Early childhood and education services for Indigenous children prior to starting school /

by Sims, Margaret | Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Closing the Gap Clearinghouse 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Closing the Gap Clearinghouse. Resource sheet ; no. 7.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011 Bibliography pp. 12-15Summary: Though school readiness is a key factor in closing the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, there are also other factors to consider when helping young children. This resource sheet reviews the evidence on early childhood and education services for Indigenous young children. It outlines what works, what doesn't, and what further research is needed. Topics include: the evidence on whether early childhood programs address disadvantage; the characteristics of successful early childhood programs; home visiting programs; integrated early childhood service delivery; the features of successful interventions; applicability to early childhood Indigenous programs; culturally specific services; and facilitators and barriers.Availability: (1)
Evaluating the effectiveness of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) / [journal article]

by Barnett, Tony | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Roost, Fatoumata Diallo | McEachran, Juliet.

Edition: Family Matters no. 91 pp. 27-37Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2012Description: 11 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: This paper uses unit record data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is conducted in partnership between the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA), the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The findings and views reported in this paper are those of the authors and should not be attributed to FaHCSIA, AIFS or the ABS.Summary: Children living in disadvantaged areas are vulnerable to developmental delay. In 2009, the Australian Government commenced the rollout of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) to 50 socially disadvantaged communities across Australia. HIPPY aims to support parents in their role as their four-year-old child’s first teacher, so that their child starts school on an equal footing to that of their more advantaged peers. A two-year quasi-experimental research design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of HIPPY. A propensity score matching technique was used to identify a matched control group from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Positive effects were found across a number of important developmental domains and spheres of influence, including the child’s cognitive ability and social-emotional adjustment, the parent’s self-efficacy and parenting style, the home learning environment, and the parents’ social connectedness and inclusion. Currently, HIPPY operates as a targeted place-based initiative. But, if the program is to have an impact on reducing social inequalities in child school readiness at the population level, it will need to reach the majority of parents and vulnerable children who are in need of more support and be linked to a universal early childhood education and care platform.Availability: (1)
Evaluation report : Breaking cycles building futures /

by University of Melbourne. Early Childhood Consortium | [Catharine Hydon] | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. unpub. 2005Description: 34 p.Other title: Breaking cycles building futures : evaluation report.Notes: May 2005 The Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) was contracted by the Department of Human Services for a 12 month period to undertake the BCBF project. Three planning stages (a literature review, consultation with stakeholders and identification of a number of principles - the 'inclusion framework' - as well as effective strategies) preceded its implementation. The BCBF inclusion framework included four overarching principles: overcoming practical and structural barriers; building positive relationships; cultural sensitivity and value for effort; and service co-ordination and linkages. (Executive Summary)Summary: "The aim of this evaluation Report for the Breaking Cycles, Building Futures (BCBF) program is to examine its implementation - its achievements, learnings, and barriers in three local government areas with a particular focus on what is transferable to elsewhere. BCBF aimed to identify and implement strategies to promote more inclusive antenatal and universal early childhood services which better engage and assist vulnerable families. It was funded to add value to the Best Start program, a three year initiative that aimed to improve the health, development, learning and wellbeing of young children across Victoria from pregnancy through to eight years. Best Start was conducted in 11 local government areas and two Indigenous communities, characterised by above-average levels of disadvantage. BCBF was conducted in three of the 11 Best Start local government areas. ; The Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) was contracted by the Department of Human Services for a 12 month period to undertake the BCBF project. Three planning stages (a literature review, consultation with stakeholders and identification of a number of principles - the 'inclusion framework' - as well as effective strategies) preceded its implementation. The BCBF inclusion framework included four overarching principles: overcoming practical and structural barriers; building positive relationships; cultural sensitivity and value for effort; and service co-ordination and linkages." -- IntroductionAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Framework to inform the development of a national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Early Childhood Strategy / SNAICC

by SNAICC - National Voice for our Children | National Indigenous Australians Agency.

Publisher: Collingwood, Vic. SNAICC - National Voice for our Children 2021Description: 38 p. ill: col.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Increasing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children’s opportunities to thrive in their early years is foundational to improving outcomes across their life course. Evidence is clear that pathways to healthy development, educational success, wellbeing and economic security are set in the first years from conception to when a child begins formal schooling. For Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families and communities, these early years are vitally important years for sharing and passing on the richness and strengths of the world’s oldest continuing cultures. Grounding children in the pride and strength of their Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander identities, languages and cultural law and traditions forms the bedrock for success throughout their lives. In consideration of the impacts of COVID-19, a phased approach to the development of the strategy has been undertaken. The first phase is the delivery of this evidence-based framework. Over the coming months, this framework will be used to inform engagement with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander early years services, experts, families and children, to develop the strategy in 2021. The framework encompasses current evidence across all aspects of young children’s lives, including early learning, health, disability, wellbeing, care, and development. It identifies that improving outcomes requires a coordinated, whole of governments, and whole of community response to children’s needs. This response must span fields including maternal and child health, housing, early education and care, disability, family, and parenting supports, ensuring child and family safety, and promoting cultural identity development. It must also seek to align cross portfolio investments to address early development holistically.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Garma 2006 key forum report : Indigenous education and training. /

by Lea, Tess (comp.) | Martin, William (comp.) | Wurm, Jackie (comp.).

Publisher: Darwin, N.T. Charles Darwin University, 2006Description: PDF.Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKAvailability: No items available
Growing up in an inclusive Victoria : Submission to the Victorian Government on the blueprint for Early Childhood Development and School Reform / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Horn, Michael.

Publisher: Fitzroy Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2008Description: 20 p. PDF.Other title: Brotherhood of St Laurence submission on the Blueprint for Early Childhood Development and School Reform.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence welcomes the Government’s commitment to better integration of policies across early childhood and education as signalled by the newly established Department of Education and Early Childhood Development. This integration opens up opportunities for targeted and sustained assistance to significantly improve the participation and development of children from disadvantaged backgrounds, especially Indigenous children. The Brotherhood also welcomes the continuing priority on strengthening educational achievement over the next five years through the proposed reform agenda. We strongly support the Government’s commitment to building the learning, skills and productivity of Victoria’s children and young adults. We therefore welcome the broad thrust of measures and investment announced in the 2008–09 State Budget. We support the three areas in the Blueprint on which the next phase of reform will focus: system development and reform, workforce reform and parent and community partnerships. We can see some acknowledgement of the important role that a child’s environment exerts on his or her development but there is not enough recognition of the impact of multiple disadvantage on children and the subsequent need for resources. We also have strong concerns regarding the lack of acknowledgment of the vital influence that social circumstances and more specifically social disadvantage exert on educational participation, commitment to learning and achievement. The social context of children and young people may include, for example, parents’ poor physical or mental health or learning disabilities, material deprivation, Indigenous or refugee background, homelessness, domestic violence and substance abuse. Furthermore, there are other barriers that children and young people face in addition to those addressed in the discussion papers. These include learning difficulties and behavioural problems which impact strongly on educational participation and outcomes for individual students, as well as on the ability of teachers and schools to ameliorate the effects of disadvantage. Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1), Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Improving Indigenous community governance through strengthening indigenous and government organisational capacity /

by Tsey, Komla | Closing the Gap Clearinghouse | McCalman, Janya | Bainbridge, Roxanne | Brown, Cath.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Closing the Gap Clearinghouse 2012Description: PDF.Other title: Closing the Gap Clearinghouse. Resource sheet ; no. 10.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2012 At head of title: Australian Government ; Australian Institute of Health and Welfare ; Australian Institute of Family Studies. AIHW cat. no. IHW 70. Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Global and local evidence shows that getting governance right is hard work, but critical to improving Indigenous health, wellbeing and quality of life. Good governance is relevant for all seven COAG-endorsed building blocks for overcoming Indigenous disadvantage: early childhood, economic participation, governance and leadership, health, healthy homes, safe communities and schooling. Governance is an issue over which Indigenous communities potentially have significant control, with sound governance structures allowing Indigenous people to effectively make decisions about their long-term goals and objectives for their communities, what kind of development they want and what actions need to be taken to achieve those goals. Good governance is about creating the conditions for legitimate and capable rule and for collective action.Availability: (1)
Indigenous Australians and preschool education: who is attending? /

by Biddle, Nicholas.

Publisher: 2007Availability: No items available
Indigenous early childhood education, school readiness and transition programs into primary school : literature review

by Dusseldorp Forum | Moyle, Kathryn | Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER).

Camberwell Vic : Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER), 2019Description: 45p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This literature review identifies, evaluates and synthesises acadmic, grey and other literature about transition to school programs for Australia's Indigenous children. It draws on both international and Australian research. Its purpse is to provide an overview of current research about factors that support effective transitions to school by Indigenous children, and to consider the role that educational television can play in those transitions. This literature review was also prepared to inform the development of the case studies about how the first season of the television program Little J and Big Cuz had been used in various remote, regional and urban early childhood education settings. It builds on other literature reviews concerning Indigenous children's transitions to school prepared in the last decade. [Executive summary, ed]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
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