Brotherhood of St Laurence

New Book List 2022

This list contains 167 titles

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Making time for great teaching : how better government policy can help / Jordana Hunter, Julie Sonnemann, Rebecca Joiner (GI)

by Hunter, Jordana | Grattan Institute | Sonnemann, Julie | Joiner, Rebecca.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2022Description: 50 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Website Summary: Teacher workloads have blown out in recent decades, and many teachers are now too stretched to do everything we ask of them. A Grattan Institute survey of 5,442 Australian teachers and school leaders, conducted for this report, found more than 90 per cent of teachers say they don’t have enough time to prepare effectively for classroom teaching – the core of their job. Teachers report feeling overwhelmed by everything they are expected to achieve. And worryingly, many school leaders feel powerless to help them. The survey results amount to a cry for help from the teachers of Australia. If governments don’t hear this cry and act on it, they will be letting down our children. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
National elder abuse prevalence study : final report / Lixia Qu, Rae Kaspiew, Rachel Carson et al. (Australian Institute of Family Studies)

by Qu, Lixia | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Kaspiew, Rae | Carson Rachel et al.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2021; © Commonwealth of Australia 2021Description: xiv, 324 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Summary Report | Website Summary: Elder abuse has gained significant attention in Australia in recent years as a serious problem requiring increased policy focus. Five abuse subtypes are commonly recognised: financial abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, psychological abuse (otherwise known as emotional abuse), and neglect. The increasingly older age profile of the Australian population makes it particularly important to address elder abuse effectively. The 65 and over age group is expected to more than double from 3.8 million to 8.8 million in the next 25 years. In Australia, research on elder abuse has been limited to studies looking at particular types of elder abuse (e.g. financial abuse), qualitative studies and those based on administrative data from services who provide support to older people. Such studies are unable to shed light on the proportion of older people aged 65 and over who experience elder abuse or which subtypes are most common. Nor are they able to assess other important issues, such as the extent to which elder abuse is under-reported. As part of the National Plan to Respond to the Abuse of Older Australians, the Attorney-General’s Department commissioned the most extensive empirical examination of elder abuse in Australia to date, the National Elder Abuse Prevalence Study. This report presents the findings of that research program. -- p. 1 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Impacts of new and emerging assistive technologies for ageing and disabled housing / Catherine Bridge ; Fredrick Zmudzki ; Tracy Huang et al. (AHURI)

by Bridge, Catherine | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Zmudzki, Fredrick | Huang, Tracy et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2021Description: vii, 118 p. : ill.Online Access: Website Summary: This research looks at how smart home assistive technologies (AT) may be best used in both the aged care and disability sectors to reduce the need for support services. It includes an assessment of ease of use, quality-of-life and cost benefit analysis, and contributes to the development of policy options that could facilitate effective adoption of smart home AT in Australia.[AHURI website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Inquiry into population, migration and agglomeration / Chris Leishman ; Nicole Gurran ; Amity James et al. (AHURI)

by Leishman, Chris | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Gurran, Nicole | James, Amity et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2021Description: vi, 51 p. : ill.Online Access: Website Summary: This Inquiry final research report investigates agglomeration economies and their ability to alter the economic productivity of cities, together with what are the key drivers of population growth and mobility in Australia.[AHURI website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Social Housing Regulation Review : interim report / Social Housing Regulation Review Panel (Vic)

by Social Housing Regulation Review Panel (Vic).

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Victorian Government, 2021Description: 136 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Interim Report (Online Resource) | Website Summary: The Victorian Government has commissioned an independent Social Housing Regulation Review. The Review aims to identify future regulatory arrangements that will best support the long-term interests of social housing residents and their communities. It also aims to best position social (and affordable) housing for growth and transformation over the coming decades. The independent Review Panel will be consulting widely throughout 2021. It will provide its preliminary recommendations to the Government based on the results of this consultation later in the year. The Panel will then seek stakeholder feedback on these recommendations before providing a final report to the Government in mid 2022. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Big data for Australian social policy : developments, benefits and risks / Edited by Janet Chan, Peter Saunders ; Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

by Chan, Janet (ed.) | Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia | Saunders, Peter (ed.).

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, 2021Description: 143 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Ebook (Online Resource) Summary: As this book reveals, it is easy to become over-enthusiastic about the potential benefits of “big data.” And the risks involved need to be carefully identified and managed. Through a series of social policy case studies, including interviews with experts involved, as well as examination of associated documentation, the authors reveal whether the potential benefits were realised, where unintended adverse impacts occurred, and lessons for good practice risk management. The editors, in the book’s opening and closing chapters, draw together the issues raised and present the consensus view of how “big data” initiatives for social policy should be conducted, particularly in the Australian context. In summary, the editors suggest that critical to successful use of big data for social policy are: The governance arrangements that promote trust, including transparency and security; Adequate infrastructure, including the skills and capacity needed to understand the quality of the data and to use it appropriately, appreciating the extent of uncertainty of any conclusions drawn; Human rights, recognising the sovereignty of those about whom the data is concerned (with particular reference to Indigenous people and communities); Consent and a “social licence” to use the data for the purposes involved; and, related to all these, Accountability. This book goes into much detail about these and related issues and suggestions. It provides essential reading for government officials, academic researchers and community leaders Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Local Area Coordination : from service users to citizen / by Ralph Broad

by Broad, Ralph | Centre for Welfare Reform.

Publisher: [Sheffield, United Kingdom] : Centre for Welfare Reform, 2012Description: [66 p.].Other title: Local Area Coordination .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Local Area Coordination (LAC) is a powerful innovation in the way in which communities ensure everyone has enough support to be a full citizen. It reverses the current pattern, in which the current welfare system starts by providing services and then often ends up by cutting people out of their own communities.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Principles of effective policy reform : lessons for Australia's climate change policy impasse/ Edited by Nicholas Brown and Stephen Dovers ; Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

by Brown, Nicholas (ed.) | Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia | Dovers, Stephen (ed.).

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, 2021Description: v, 74 p, PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This discussion paper offers 10 case studies of Australian policy initiatives over recent decades. The areas covered were selected on the basis of exhibiting several of the following features: • having a considerable degree of difficulty and complexity, such that they related to several areas of interest and contest; • attending to a long-term issue, and requiring maintenance of policy attention and longevity across multiple terms of government; • having some combination of social, economic and environmental dimensions (that is, a diversity of values and imperatives); • likely requiring the use and coordination of multiple policy instruments; • requiring substantial structural adjustment, transitional support measures, or other compensatory measures; and • requiring multiple points of policy integration, in analysis, design and implementation. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Home and living options for people with disabilities : a systematic review and environmental scan of strategies to support transition from group homes and congregate care, and those which prevent movement to congregate settings / Mary-Ann O'Donovan, Eleni Demetriou, Erin Whittle et al. (Centre for Disability Studies) (University of Sydney)

by O’Donovan, Mary-Ann | Centre for Disability Studies | Demetriou, Eleni | Whittle, Erin et al | University of Sydney.

Publisher: Sydney, N.SW. : Centre for Disability Studies ; The University of Sydney, 2021Description: 226 p. (Online Resource) : ill.Online Access: Review (Online Resource) Summary: The aim of this review was to understand the interventions and strategies that are being used to help people transition out of institutional care into more individualised home and living options. Oliver et al (2020) define individualised housing as “housing options that are life stage appropriate, where people with disability have choice regarding where and with whom they live, the support they receive and their day to day activities”. This is a useful definition to guide reference to individualised housing in this report but the reader should note that often papers did not clearly define what was meant by individualised or community in the specific context. The review also aimed to document the evidence for the strategies found to support this transition. A systematic review and environmental scan of evidence from 2000-2020 across 10 academic databases, 55 organisation websites and 49 grey literature documents was run in October 2020. The academic literature predominantly reported on the process of de-institutionalisation to community group living (n=48 of 105). Twenty papers from this literature specifically addressed individualised or independent supported living models. The grey literature provided evidence of individualised or independent supported living (n=16), and movement from congregated settings (n=22). The environmental scan described accommodation interventions and supports implemented in the disability sector, with 26 organisations providing specialist accommodation and 21 offering consulting and information services to support people with disabilities in the housing process. The comprehensive search that was conducted included five types of accommodation that people with disabilities transitioned into, which facilitated greater independence as alternatives to institutional or group home models. In this review, this included: 1. Community or supported; 2. Independent or semi-independent homes, including living alone, co-residency, relationships; 3. Home ownership (shared equity); 4. Home pooling; 5. Housing modifications/redesign/technology including assistive technology and wider living ecology adaptations. Though housing modifications are not a transition to other housing per se, support to redesign and adapt a home is an intervention which is typically employed to prevent transition to congregate setting and was therefore included as part of this review. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
National Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Early Childhood Strategy / National Indigenous Australians Agency

by National Indigenous Australians Agency.

Publisher: Canberra ACT : National Indigenous Australians Agency 2021Description: 52 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Website Summary: The purpose of the Strategy is to pave the way for governments, non-government sectors and communities to collectively support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to grow up healthy, engaged with education, connected to family and community, and strong in culture. The Strategy has been developed in partnership with SNAICC – National Voice for our Children, and the National Indigenous Australians Agency, with the guidance of an Advisory Group (see Appendix A). This Strategy reflects the views of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, families and communities who participated in a national consultation process, and shared their experiences, aspirations and priorities for the future wellbeing of their children. This Strategy is the foundation for working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to create positive change and lasting benefits for children and families. -- P.6 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
UK poverty 2022 : the essential guide to understanding poverty in the UK / JRF

by Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Publisher: York, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2022Description: 115 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: What is the picture of poverty at the start of 2022, coming up to two years after a global pandemic struck? To an extent the picture is unclear: we don’t yet have official poverty data covering the pandemic period, and we know that the quality of the very surveys we rely on for this information were affected by the onset of the pandemic. But many sources make it clear that while some groups have been well supported and face better prospects as we enter 2022, others face deep and persistent poverty. In a way this is much better than might be expected given the economic and social shock the country has been through. We know poverty at any stage in life can lead to negative impacts and so it is critical to scrutinise the data thoroughly to work out who is worst affected, determine how trends are changing over time and see what future prospects are. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The social and economic rationale of inclusive education : an overview of the outcomes in education for diverse groups of students / Cecilia Mezzanotte (OECD)

by Mezzanotte, Cecilia | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France : OECD Publishing, 2022Description: 93 p. (Online resource).Online Access: Website Summary: Since UNESCO’s Salamanca Declaration in 1994, inclusive education has progressively attracted attention in international debates around education policy. While some evidence exists on the positive impact that inclusive education reforms can have on the academic and personal outcomes of diverse students – and in particular of students with special education needs – limited information is available on the economic sustainability of such reforms. Starting from the literature on the correlations between education and individuals’ life outcomes, this paper reviews the existing evidence on the potential benefits and costs of inclusive education reforms. Specifically, the paper discusses the evidence on the shortcomings of current education settings for diverse groups of students – with specific sections on students with special education needs; immigrant and refugee students; ethnic groups, national minorities and Indigenous peoples; gifted students; female and male students; and LGBTQI+ (which stands for ‘lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex’) students. It highlights the individual and societal costs deriving from the low academic, social and emotional outcomes of these students and the socioeconomic costs these yield for societies. Where possible, the paper also presents evidence on the effects of inclusive education reforms on diverse student groups.[Abstract]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Upskilling and reskilling : the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on employers and their training choices / Ian White and Toni Rittie (NCVER)

by White, Ian | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Rittie, Toni.

Publisher: Adelaide, SA : National Centre for Vocational Education Research, 2022; © Commonwealth of Australia, 2022Description: 55 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Using data from the Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System and other complementary sources, this report examines how employers have fared due to the COVID-19 pandemic and what this has meant for their current and future training requirements. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Report on government services / Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision

by Australia. Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision | Australia. Steering Committee for the Review of Commonwealth/State Service Provision.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Productivity Commission 1995 -Online Access: Report on Government Services Enumeration/Chronology: 1st (1995) - Notes: This report was produced under the direction of the Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision (SCRGSP).; Editions: 1995 ; 1996 ; 1997 ; 1998 ; 1999 ; 2000 ; 2001 ; 2002 ; 2003 ; 2004 ; 2005 ; 2006 ; 2007 ; 2008 ; 2009 ; 2010 ; 2011 ; 2012 ; 2013 ; 2014 ; 2015 ; 2016 ; 2017 ; 2018 ; 2019 ; 2020 ; 2021 ; 2022; Earlier editions accessible by changing the year in the white box and pressing ‘Change year'. - Productivity Commission websiteSummary: The Report on Government Services provides a public report card on the performance of Australian governments in the delivery of important services to the community. The Report looks at a broad range of indicators relating to the cost, quality and timeliness of services covering: Education ; Justice Community services ; Health ; Emergency management ; Housing and homelessness Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission regarding 'minimum energy efficiency standards for rental homes in the ACT' consultation paper / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Sullivan, Damian.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence Description: 4 p. PDF.Other title: Submission re Minimum energy efficiency standards for rental homes in the ACT | [Submission to] Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate ACT Government.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The BSL strongly supports minimum energy efficiency standards for rented homes, which we see as a vital policy that will lower cost of living and improve health and comfort for renters, particularly the people facing disadvantage who we work with. Standards are particularly effective at improving the quality of the poorest quality homes, which are often rented by people on low incomes. People in these poor quality homes are too often in an unenviable position – high rent and low income give them limited choice in the market, if they end up in a poor quality home (as they often do) they face higher electricity bills or poor health and wellbeing outcomes. Minimum standards can go some way to addressing this issue. Standards will also contribute to Australia’s climate change response and improve air pollution. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission re the New Disability Employment Service Model / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley | Thies, Andrew.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 14 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) is pleased to contribute to the consultation into the development of the new Disability Employment Services (DES) model. We have outlined in this submission key recommendations for the development of DES that promote best practice disability employment policy. These practices are informed by: the experience of BSL’s NDIS participants in the Pathways to Employment (P2E) project ; the experience of BSL’s Local Area Coordination (LAC) staff who have interacted with the DES program, either through referring NDIS participants or having previously worked with DES providers ; BSL’s expertise in employment-related research, program delivery and systems change work of the National Youth Employment Body (NYEB) (BSL 2022b) conducted with jobseekers, employers and services providers ; academic literature. System level recommendations 1. Adopt a clear, person-centred vision for DES focused on access to and attainment of decent work 2. Improve connections and alignment between systems through governance mechanisms 3. Invest in more demand-side policy interventions 4. Commission to encourage collaboration, not competition Policy level recommendations 5. Expand access and eligibility for DES to all people with disability 6. Co-design adaptive employment policy with employers 7. Redefine mutual obligations as mutual accountabilities Program level recommendations 8. Develop program models that provide more training and upskilling opportunities 9. Define and measure success in conjunction with participants 10. Embed feedback mechanisms into DES for real choice and control for participants – p.3 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Environmental scan part 1 : current research and evaluation to promote economic participation of people with disability / Diane Brown and Shelley Mallett (BSL)

by Brown, Diane | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 102 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Environmental Scan Part 1 (Research Report) | Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability Project [Website] Notes: Environmental Scan part 1 and Environment Scan Part 2 are linked to the Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability project. To learn more about the project click the website link. Summary: This report details findings from Part 1 of a two-part Environmental Scan of current practice of employment interventions and research for people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability. The Environmental Scan includes: 1. A desktop scan of current and recent Australian research; and current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally (2015-2021 inclusive) 2. Interviews and focus groups with experts in the disability employment policy and program field (presented in a second report, Environmental Scan Part 2: Views of experts in the field on effective employment interventions for people with a disability). This Environmental Scan is one component of a broader project commissioned by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) designed to examine the scope and evidence for different interventions that improve the economic participation and employment of people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disabilities. The project will help provide the NDIA with the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of different employment interventions. Alongside the Environmental Scan, the full project also includes a Systematic Review, including a review of the theoretical evidence (see Systematic Review Technical Report, and Summary Report). Scope of the Environmental Scan Part 1 Part 1 of the Environmental Scan set out to map the current landscape of research and interventions aimed at promoting economic participation of people with a disability (with a focus on the three target populations) and identify promising areas of practice or innovation. This report addresses two of the three questions proposed by the NDIA for the Environmental Scan: 1. What research aimed at improving employment participation of people with either autism, intellectual disability or psychosocial disability is currently underway? 2. What are the applicable current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally? Part 1 of the Environmental Scan is primarily descriptive with some limited analysis of the quality of intervention (using meta-evaluation) and identification of gaps and indicators of innovation. -- p. 3 ; ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Environmental scan part 2 : views of experts on effective employment interventions for people with disability / Shelley Mallett, Diane Brown and James Finnis (BSL)

by Mallett, Shelley | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Brown, Diane | Finnis, James.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 26 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Environmental Scan Part 2 (Research Report) | Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability Project [Website] Notes: Environmental Scan part 1 and Environment Scan Part 2 are linked to the Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability project. To learn more about the project click the website link. Summary: This report details findings from Part 2 of an Environmental Scan of current practice of employment interventions and research for people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability. The Environmental Scan includes: 1. A desktop scan of current and recent Australian research; and current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally (2015-2021 inclusive) (Environmental Scan Part 1: desktop review of current research and interventions to promote economic participation of people with a disability). 2. Interviews and focus groups with experts in the disability employment policy and program field (presented in this report). This Environmental Scan is one component of a broader project commissioned by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) designed to examine the scope and evidence for different interventions that improve the economic participation and employment of people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disabilities. The project will help provide the NDIA with the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of different employment interventions. Alongside the Environmental Scan, the full project also includes a Systematic Review, including a review of the theoretical evidence (see Systematic Review Technical Report and Summary Report). Scope of the Environmental Scan Part 2: This report addresses the third question proposed by the NDIA for the Environmental Scan: what are the views of experts in the field on effective employment interventions for people with a disability (with a focus on people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability)? The report details findings from a series of focus groups and interviews with academics and senior government and non-government executives who hold deep expertise in disability employment policy and programs. Interviews and focus groups were conducted over a one-month period at the end of 2020. Participating experts were invited to provide insight into the critical aspects of effective employment programs and practices based on their knowledge and experience. Focus group and interview discussions centred around three key sub-questions in relation to the disability employment intervention field: What is working? ; What is not working? ; What is missing? ; ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Achieving a 'sense of purpose' : pathways to employment for NDIS participants with intellectual disability, on the autism spectrum and/with psychosocial disability / Prepared by L Smith, A Ames, M Bennett etal (NDIA)

by Smith, L | National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) | Ames, A | Bennett, M et al.

Publisher: [S.l.] : National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA), 2021; © The National Disability Insurance AgencyDescription: 95 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Achieving a ‘sense of purpose’: research report.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The research project: This research project was aimed at exploring the barriers and enablers to gaining and maintaining paid employment for NDIS participants with intellectual disability, on the autism spectrum, and/or with psychosocial disability. This research included: In-depth interviews with 85 NDIS participants (families, carers or informal or formal supporters) aged 14 to 44 years; Focus groups and interviews with 37 NDIS service delivery staff (NDIS planners or delegates, Local Area Coordinators (LACs), Partners in the Community (PiTC) and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs); and Responses from 142 NDIS service delivery staff to an online survey. Interviews and focus groups were conducted via video online, telephone, or email. Key insights: A lack of inclusive employment options was identified by participants as the greatest barrier to finding a job. This included the lack of flexibility or inclusivity of workplace environments and the stigma of psychosocial disability and autism spectrum. Participants also identified issues with the support they received from the NDIS, such as a feeling of not being well understood by service delivery staff and the lack of clarity around the funding and supports available. This was supplemented by the complexity of the system. Further barriers included: Lack of discourse about careers and focus of short term employment goals; Lack of post-school training and education options and clarity about what supports and services are available to support these; and Participants lack of self-confidence. Person-centred employment planning was identified as a key enabler to supporting participants to achieve their career aspirations, as was starting employment and planning conversations early (e.g. while in school), and participant’s own networks, informal supports and role models. Six key areas of influence and opportunities for action emerged from the data: 1. Person-centred planning and supports 2. Participant empowerment and engagement 3. Informal and own networks 4. School level and early intervention initiatives 5. Formal education and training post school 6. Inclusive, flexible and adaptive workplaces Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Economic insecurity and intimate partner violence in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic / Anthony Morgan ; Hayley Boxall ; ANROWS

by Morgan, Anthony | Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety | Boxall, Hayley.

Publisher: Sydney, NSW : Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety (ANROWS), 2022Description: iv, 70 p. ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted significant concerns about the “shadow pandemic” of violence against women and children, in particular intimate partner violence (IPV). There is now a large body of research in Australia exploring the effects of the pandemic on violence against women and children, and specifically IPV. The research has indicated that matters being referred to IPV services are more complex, and victims and survivors are experiencing increased barriers to reporting IPV and seeking support. Economic insecurity and intimate partner violence in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic, led by Anthony Morgan and Hayley Boxall at the Australian Institute of Criminology, focuses on the intersection of economic insecurity and women’s experiences of IPV in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. The findings are based on a survey of 10,000 women in Australia, aged 18 years and over, administered between February and April 2021. This report represents Stage 2 of a larger national study, with Stage 1 focusing on women’s experiences of IPV more broadly during the first 12 months of the pandemic. The report found that experiences of economic insecurity were common among women during the first 12 months of COVID-19. Economic insecurity was associated with an increased likelihood of IPV among women and co-occurred with other vulnerabilities reported by women which were associated with an increased likelihood of IPV. The report also found that economic disparity within relationships was associated with IPV – even after controlling for economic insecurity. The relationship between economic status, stress and disparity and IPV varied according to the type of IPV, and whether it was experienced as a chronic condition or an acute stressor. Finally, consistent with other Australian and international research, there was clear evidence that the acute economic stressors associated with the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with both the onset and escalation of IPV. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Mid-term Review of the Disability Employment Services (DES) Program / Boston Consulting Group ; Department of Social Services

by Boston Consulting Group | Australia. Department of Social Services.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Department of Social Services, 2020Description: 178 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Disability Employment Services (DES) Program was reformed from 1 July 2018, with Grant Agreements in place until June 2023. This report is the mid-term review of the DES program, undertaken by Boston Consulting Group (BCG) on behalf of the Department of Social Services, between May and August 2020. BCG put forward suggestions, such as: Improving the delivery model so that participant and employer needs are better met ; Creating an integrated government approach to the provision of disability and employment support ; Addressing the sustainability of the DES program caseload and expenditure ; Ultimately, improving the number and quality of employment outcomes for people with disability. The Department of Social Services is committed to delivering effective supports to help people with disability into employment. The mid-term review informed improvements to the DES program, announced in the 2020-21 and 2021-22 Budgets. From mid-2021, public consultation will begin on a new disability employment services model to replace the current DES program, following the expiration of current arrangements on 30 June 2023. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Ending homelessness in Australia : an evidence and policy deep dive / Report prepared by Paul Flatau, Leanne Lester, Ami Seivwright et al (Centre for Social Impact)

by Flatau, Paul | Centre for Social Impact | Lester, Leanne | Seivwright, Ami et al.

Publisher: Perth : Centre for Social Impact, University of Western Australia, 2021Description: pp. col. ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Ending homelessness in Australia research report (Online Resource) | Bulletin No 1 Ending homelessness in Australia (Online Resource) | Bulletin No 2 Findings from the Advance to Zero database (Online Resource) | Website Summary: Ending homelessness in Australia: An evidence and policy deep dive is the latest research report (Feb 2022) in CSI's Deep Dive series, and has been created in partnerhip with the Australian Alliance to End Homelessness (AAEH) and Neami National. Completed by researchers from CSI UWA and UNSW, the objectives of the research are twofold. First, to collate and assess the current evidence base on the state of homelessness in Australia and its key drivers. Second, to set out an evidence-informed policy and practice agenda towards ending homelessness in Australia. Homelessness is a complex problem and, if we are to end it, we need to understand and engage all the levers available to us (whether they’re currently being used or not). This research report puts forward five key actions which are required to end homelessness in Australia: 1. Leadership and proactivity at the Australian Government level and a national end homelessness strategy. 2.An increase in the supply of social and affordable housing directed to an end homelessness goal 3.Comprehensive application of Housing First programs linked to supportive housing for those entering permanent housing with long histories of homelessness and high health and other needs 4.Targeted prevention and early intervention programs to turn off the tap of entry into homelessness which address the underlying drivers of homelessness 5.Supportive systems and programs which build the enablers of an end homelessness program: advocacy, commitment and resource flow to ending homelessness; effective service integration; culturally safe and appropriate service delivery; and improving data quality, evaluation and research around ending homelessness in Australia. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Service innovation deep dive : capturing and leveraging learnings from service innovation during COVID-19 / Centre for Social Impact

by Centre for Social Impact.

Publisher: Centre for Social Impact, 2021Description: pp. col. ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: National research report (Online Resource) | Research summary (Online Resource) | Western Australia research report (Online Resource) | Victoria research report (Online Resource) | New South Wales research report (Online Resource) | Website Summary: Service Innovation Deep Dive: Acknowledging the significant impact of COVID-19 on community services, a team of CSI researchers from UWA, Swinburne and UNSW sought to understand the ways in which organisations in the aged care, disability, and emergency relief sectors innovated during COVID-19, and the learnings, practices and activities they want to continue beyond the pandemic. Representatives from more than 34 organisations in Western Australia, Victoria and New South Wales were interviewed from late 2020 to early 2021 for the five-part Service Innovation Deep Dive, and the research was driven by the core questions: What have services done differently during the COVID-19 crisis and what do they want to do differently in their post-pandemic service delivery? Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Preparing for the Future of Work Across Australia / Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

Publisher: Paris : OECD Publishing, 2021Description: 155 p. (online resource).Other title: OECD reviews on local job creation .Online Access: Website Summary: COVID-19 is likely to leave long-lasting effects on local labour markets. It is accelerating a pre-existing trend towards automation, as firms look even more to new technologies to pandemic proof their operations. While automation offers the opportunity to boost productivity, it can also lead to job polarisation as vulnerable workers who lose their jobs may not have the skills needed in a changing labour market. This OECD report examines the potential impacts of automation on people and places across Australia. It also sheds light on policies and programmes that can help regions and cities to prepare for the future of work. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Class in Australia.

by Threadgold, Steven.(ed.) | Gerrard, Jessica (ed.).

Publisher: Clayton, Vic. Monash University Pub, 2022Description: 1 Volume. viii, 270 p.Summary: Two decades since it was claimed that class is dead, social, economic and cultural inequalities are rising. Though Australia is often described as a ‘lucky country’ with a strong economy, we are witness to intensifying inequality with entrenched poverty and the growth of precarious and insecure labour. The disconnect of the rusted-on Labor voter and the rise of far-right politics suggest there is an urgent need to examine the contemporary functions of class relations. Class analysis in Australia has always had a contested position. The prominence of scholarship from the UK and US has often meant class analysis in Australia has had little to say about its settler colonial history and the past and present dynamics of race and racism that are deeply embedded in social and labour relations. In the post-war turn away from Marx and subsequent embrace of Bourdieu, much sociological research on class has focused on explorations of consumption and culture. Long-standing feminist critiques of the absence of gendered labour in class analysis also pose challenges for understanding and researching class. At a time of deepening inequality, Class in Australia brings together a range of new and original research for a timely examination of class relations, labour exploitation, and the changing formations of work in contemporary Australian society. ‘This book is a powerful and vibrant study of the complex realities of class in modern Australia. It brings to light the intersection of class with gender, race, and the ongoing dispossession of First Nations peoples, and dispels the myth that class division is not relevant to the contemporary age.’ – Sally McManus, ACTU Secretary ‘From colonial inequality to Upper Middle Bogan, this captivating volume dives deep into how class has shaped our nation. Through studies of the unemployed, warehouse workers, unions and school students, this book presents the finest analysis of class that Australian sociology has to offer. Read it to get a richer understanding of poverty, a stronger sense of social status, and a nuanced analysis of how gender, race and sexuality intersect with class.’ – Andrew Leigh MP ‘Class is central to Australians’ lives but it is rarely analysed or even talked about. In this book Threadgold and Gerrard have pulled together the foremost thinkers on class, intersectionality and prejudice in Australia.’ – Hon Dr Meredith Burgmann AM ‘This is a must-read collection for anyone interested in the topic of class in Australia. This collection digs deeps and engages with relevant and timely discussions about class using both an historical and contemporary lens. For anyone who is teaching, studying, or writing about class as theory or method, this book will open up rich and productive conversations. Class is an enduring problematic, both as a descriptor, heuristic device or theoretical framework. This collection aptly responds to this problematic, engaging with class across multiple intersections including gender, race and space. It taps into class as symbolic and ephemeral whilst also highlighting the material, tangible divisions that it produces.’ – Dr. Emma Rowe, Senior Lecturer in Education, Deakin University ‘Class in Australia is a timely provocation to social scientists to rethink class, offering a series of deep reflections on the complexities and opportunities of class-based analysis. An inspiring collection of authors brings new questions, conceptual frameworks and methodologies to class analysis. Acknowledging that the dynamics of settler colonialism are central, this collection is positioned to invigorate familiar approaches focusing on education, migration, and labour, gender, sexuality, and cultural representations. The new class analysis starts here.’ – Johanna Wyn, Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor, The University of MelbourneAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Home Energy Assist - Affordable Retrofits : project evaluation report / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: unpub. © 2019Description: 154 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Victorian Government Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) engaged the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) to deliver the Home Energy Assist Affordable Retrofits Trial (HEAART) to provide access to energy efficiency upgrades and rooftop solar photovoltaics (PV) to 100 low-income and vulnerable Victorian households. The trial provided access to rooftop solar PV and energy efficiency upgrades through a co-funding model, whereby the cost of upgrades was split between the household and a contribution from the program. The upgrade packages represented “deep” retrofits, i.e. multiple upgrades to have a substantial impact on the household’s energy usage and/or comfort. This Evaluation Report should be read in conjunction with the Project Documentation Report (PDR). Revisiting the key metrics from the Project Documentation Report The PDR outlined key components of project delivery. In summary, between June 2019 and December 2018, during the pilot delivery phase: 88 households received upgrade packages ; 315 individual upgrades were installed ; 66 Scorecard assessments were delivered through the HEAART program Of the major upgrades installed, there were 67 reverse cycle air-conditioners, 13 solar PV systems, 16 gas heaters or ducting upgrades, 13 hot water systems (instantaneous gas or heat pumps), and 28 ceiling insulation installations. In addition, there were 126 draught sealing jobs undertaken, 21 appliance upgrades, 13 lighting upgrades, 8 external blinds, and 3 ceiling fans installed. The average upgrade cost was $4,973, with participants contributing on average $2,327. The total cost of all upgrades was $437,6681, with participants contributing $204,810 and the HEAART project contributing $233,889. – p. 5 ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Home Energy Assist - Affordable Retrofits : project documentation report/ BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: unpub. © 2019Description: 110 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Victorian Government Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) engaged the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) to deliver the Home Energy Assist Affordable Retrofits Trial (HEAART) to provide access to energy efficiency and rooftop solar to 100 low income and vulnerable Victorian households. Originally conceived as a pilot, HEAART was conducted to evaluate the scalability and impact of the delivery model proposed by DELWP and refined by BSL. Trial participants were provided with information to assist with decision making (in the form of a Scorecard assessment and advise on the different upgrade options), access to a panel of prevetted suppliers, a subsidy towards the upgrades, assistance with suppliers and access to a nointerest loan. The trial provided access to rooftop solar and energy efficiency upgrades through a co-funding model, whereby the cost of upgrades was split between the household and a contribution from the program. As a point of differentiation from other programs, the intention of the upgrade package was that it represent a significant or “deep” retrofit, i.e. have a substantial impact on the household’s energy usage and/or comfort. In practice, “deep retrofits” were interpreted to consist of multiple upgrades and/or with total costs above a minimum value. An additional design principle, to complement the co-funding approach, was that participants were supported and given agency to implement upgrades appropriate to their context, through advice and consultation based on the participants’ preferences and the outcome of a Victorian Residential Efficiency Scorecard assessment. A Final Project Report will be delivered, as well as this Project Documentation Report, with further analysis of the impact of upgrade packages, and a summary of the results and learnings of the program. – p. 5 ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Changing the landscape : a national resource to prevent violence against women and girls with disabilities / Our Watch ; Women with Disabilities Victoria

by Our Watch | Women with Disabilities Victoria.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Our Watch, 2022Description: 108 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Main Report | Summary Summary: Violence against women and girls with disabilities is a serious violation of human rights. Across every state and territory in Australia, women and girls with disabilities experience violence, abuse and neglect at much higher rates than men with disabilities or people without disabilities.2 Despite the limited data on violence against women and girls with disabilities globally, evidence demonstrates that the high rates of violence against women and girls with disabilities is a consistent pattern in many countries around the world.3 However, this violence is not inevitable – it is preventable.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
How learning continued during the COVID-19 pandemic : global lessons from initiatives to support learners and teachers / edited by Stephan Vincent-Lancrin, Cristobal Cobo Romani and Fernando Reimers (OECD) (World Bank)

by Vincent-Lancrin, Stephan [editor ] | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) | Cobo Romani, Cristobal [editor] | Reimers, Fernando [editor] | World Bank Group.

Publisher: Paris : OECD Publishing, 2022Description: 384 p. (online resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report brings together 45 of the education continuity stories that were jointly documented by the OECD, the World Bank, Harvard’s Global Education Innovation Initiative and HundrED during the first wave of school closures related to the COVID-19 pandemic. It covers a variety of different examples on how governments and non-governmental organisations quickly responded to school closures to implement a strategy for learners around the world to continue to study. While often based on the use of digital solutions, those solutions target specific solutions aimed at academic learning, socio-emotional support, teacher professional development, etc. The book covers examples from low, middle and high income countries on all continents and draws some lessons of these fast-paced responses to reimagine a post-pandemic education across the world. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Schooling during a pandemic : the experience and outcomes of schoolchildren during the first round of COVID-19 lockdowns / William Thorn and Stephan Vincent-Lancrin (OECD)

by Thorn, William | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) | Vincent-Lancrin, Stephan.

Publisher: Paris : OECD Publishing, 2021Description: 110 p. (online resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report offers an initial overview of the available information regarding the circumstances, nature and outcomes of the education of schoolchildren during the first wave of COVID-19 lockdowns of March-April 2020. Its purpose is primarily descriptive: it presents information from high quality quantitative studies on the experience of learning during this period in order to ground the examination and discussion of these issues in empirical examples. Information is presented on three interrelated topics: the nature of the educational experience during the period of lockdowns and school closures; the home environment in which education took place for the vast majority of schoolchildren; the effects on the mental health and learning outcomes for children during this period. The data come primarily from 5 countries (France, Germany, Ireland, the United Kingdom and the United States) with additional information on some aspects for 6 additional countries (Australia, Belgium (Flanders), Canada, Finland, Italy and the Netherlands). This report will be of interest to policy makers, academics, education stakeholders and anyone interested in a first international empirical analysis of the effects of the pandemic on the lives and education of schoolchildren. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The engagement of traditional owners in the economic development of northern Australia / Joint Standing Committee on Northern Australia

by Australia. Parliament. Joint Standing Committee on Northern Australia | Entsch, Warren [Chair].

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. : [Joint Standing Committee on Northern Australia], 2022Publisher: © Commonwealth of AustraliaDescription: xx, 111 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The great majority of the land mass of northern Australia has been claimed or recognised under land rights or native title legislation. Land is the greatest asset for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the region. But the huge challenge today is leveraging land and sea assets for the economic and social advancement of Indigenous communities. This report examines the nature of this challenge and considers the potential for making the best use of the opportunities provided by title to land. -- page 1 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The job insecurity report / Senate Select Committee on Job Security

by Australia. Parliament. Senate Select Committee on Job Security | Sheldon, Tony [Chair].

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. : [Senate Select Committee on Job Security], 2022Publisher: © Commonwealth of AustraliaDescription: xxii, 299 p. PDF.Other title: Fourth interim report : the job insecurity report.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: 1.1There is no single definition of 'insecure and precarious work'. However, the definition employed for the Australian Council of Trade Unions' (ACTU) 2012 independent inquiry into insecure work in Australia provides an excellent starting point. 1.2 In 2012 the ACTU commissioned a panel led by the Hon Brian Howe AO, former Deputy Prime Minister of Australia, to conduct an inquiry into the extent, causes and impacts of insecure work. For the purposes of that inquiry, 'insecure work' was defined as 'that which provides workers with little social and economic security and little control over their working lives'.1 1.3 While the panel acknowledged that any worker can experience insecurity from time to time, the inquiry focussed on forms of employment considered to be 'prone to insecure work, including casual work, fixed-term contracts, seasonal work, contracting and labour hire'. It also looked at part-time work, which is not always insecure, but can be.2 The 'indicators of insecure work' utilised by the panel for the independent inquiry were: (i) unpredictable, fluctuating pay; (ii) inferior rights and entitlements, including limited or no access to paid leave; (iii) irregular and unpredictable working hours, or working hours that, although regular, are too long or too few and/or nonsocial or fragmented; (iv) lack of security and/or uncertainty over the length of the job; and (v) lack of voice at work on wages, conditions and work organisation.3 1.4 This report draws on the above definition, while acknowledging that submitters and witnesses who participated in the inquiry may have defined insecure work in other ways. – p. 1 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Tracking progress against the Implementation Plan goals for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023 / AIHW

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2021Description: [92 p.] PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Website Summary: This web report is a data visualisation tool for tracking progress against the 20 Implementation Plan goals for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013–2023. It presents data for each of the 20 goals, and assesses progress against the goals at the national level.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
National Advisory Council on Poverty / Employment and Social Development Canada

by Canada. Employment and Social Development Canada | National Advisory Council on Poverty (Advisory Council).

Publisher: [Gatineau, Quebec] : [Employment and Social Development Canada], 2021-Description: pp. ill.. (Online Resource).Other title: Reports ­ - National Advisory Council on Poverty.Online Access: Building Understanding : the First Report of the National Advisory Council on Poverty (2020) | Understanding Systems : the 2021 Report of the National Advisory Council on Poverty (202) | Website Summary: In August 2018, the Government of Canada announced Opportunity for All – Canada’s First Poverty Reduction Strategy. The Strategy included a commitment to the UN Sustainable Development Goal’s target of reducing poverty by 20% by 2020 and 50% by 2030. Opportunity for All included the adoption of the Market Basket Measure (MBM) as Canada’s Official Poverty Line and the creation of the National Advisory Council on Poverty (Council) to report on progress made toward the poverty reduction targets. It continues Canada’s discussion on poverty by bringing forward the voices of individuals with lived expertise of poverty. It details progress toward our poverty targets and recommends improvements to our poverty reduction efforts Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The unequal pandemic : COVID-19 and health inequalities / Clare Bambra, Julia Lynch, Katherine E. Smith ; with a foreword by Professor Kate Pickett.

by Bambra, C. (Clare) [author.] | Lynch, Julia, 1970- [author.] | Smith, Katherine E [author.].

Edition: 1st.Publisher: Bristol : Policy Press, 2021Description: xiv, 183 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website [PDF available on website] Notes: Back Cover.Summary: This accessible, yet authoritative book shows how the pandemic is a syndemic of disease and inequality. Drawing on international data and accounts, it argues that these inequalities are a political choice and we need to learn quickly to prevent growing inequality and to reduce health inequalities in the future.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Common Ground Housing Model Practice Manual / Tom Alves, Nicola Brackertz, Christian Roggenbuck et al. (AHURI)

by Alves, Tom | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Brackertz, Nicola | Roggenbuck, Christian et al | MGS Architects | Mind Australia.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2021; © Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute Limited Description: v, 52 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Authors: Tom Alves, Nicola Brackertz, Christian Roggenbuck, Laura Hayes, Rob McGauran, Katherine Sundermann, Natalie Kyneton Bibliography : p. 47-49Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Mapping Disability Research in Australia 2018-2020 / Jennifer Smith-Merry, Gisselle Gallego, Ivy Yen et al. (Centre for Disability Research and Policy)

by Smith-Merry, Jennifer [Author.] | Gallego, Gisselle [Author.] | Yen, Ivy [Author.] | University of Sydney. Centre for Disability Research and Policy.

Publisher: Camperdown : Centre for Disability Research & Policy, The University of Sydney. 2021Description: 96 : ill p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF This mapping report provides a comprehensive picture of the current state of disability research in Australia in the period since the Audit of Disability Research Update Report was published in 2017. We conducted a systematic search of journal articles, book chapters and reports to identify Australian disability research published over the 2018-2020 period. We identified 1241 journal articles and book chapters and 225 publicly available reports produced over the 2018-2020 period. We undertook a deeper, narrative analysis on key topics. These topics were chosen because they built on the categories used in the original audit reports (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People with disability, policy and secondary use of data), along with areas raised by our consortium as important for understanding the breadth of disability research in Australia (people with disability from culturally and linguistically diverse communities, children and young people, rights-based approaches, and co-research and inclusive research). We also added in an in-depth analysis of funding cited in papers.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Not so universal : how to reduce out-of-pocket healthcare payments / Stephen Duckett, Anika Stobart, and Linda Lin (GI)

by Duckett, Stephen | Grattan Institute | Stobart, Anika | Lin, Linda.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2022Description: 58 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Website (incl chart data) Summary: Australia’s universal health insurance scheme, Medicare, is designed to make healthcare available to all, no matter how wealthy or poor. And mostly, it achieves this goal. Public hospital care is free, and the vast majority of services outside of hospital are ‘bulk-billed’ – meaning the patient pays nothing out-of-pocket. But Medicare is not perfect. Australia still relies more heavily on patients contributing to the cost of their care, compared to similar countries. In 2019-20, Australians spent a total of nearly $7 billion on out-of-hospital medical services and on medications listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). Many Australians can’t afford needed care. In 2020-21, nearly half a million Australians missed out on seeing a specialist because of cost, and more than half a million deferred or did not fill a prescription because of cost. The people who need the most healthcare – the poor and the chronically ill – miss out on care most. This is bad for those individuals, but also bad for taxpayers and the economy. It makes people sicker, widens inequities, and puts further strain on the health system down the track. This report identifies which out-of-hospital services are putting a financial strain on Australians, and what should be done to bring out-of-pocket payments down, so that fewer Australians miss out on care because of cost. [Overview] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
'What works' to sustain Indigenous tenancies in Australia / Megan Moskos ; Linda Isherwood ; Michael Dockery et al. (AHURI)

by Moskos, Megan | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Isherwood, Linda | Dockery, Michael et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2022Description: viii, 125 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This research examines the characteristics of successful tenancies for Indigenous people to understand ‘what works’ for securing successful housing outcomes. It explores the successful initiatives in sustaining tenancies for Indigenous people and what particular elements contribute to this success, including for different types of housing—private and social housing, and across different locations—urban, rural and remote. Indigenous Australians face considerable barriers to achieving successful housing outcomes. Only around a third of Indigenous Australians own their own home, compared to two-thirds of non-Indigenous people. Consequently, a far greater proportion of Indigenous people (around 60%) live in rental accommodation than non-Indigenous people (30%). Indigenous households are particularly over-represented in the social housing sector due to difficulties experienced in accessing private rental accommodation. These difficulties include racial discrimination within the private rental market; challenges meeting criteria for properties; and lack of appropriate and good quality housing. The research identifies several barriers to the delivery of tenancy support programs, including a lack of cultural understanding and the provision of culturally inappropriate services.[Website].Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to Inquiry into Renewable Energy in Victoria / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Sullivan, Damian.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 7 p. PDF.Other title: [Submission to] Legislative Council Environment and Planning Committee Parliament of Victoria.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: It is crucial that Victoria and Australia transition to 100% renewables in keeping with the Paris Agreement. Warming above 1.5 °C presents unacceptable risks to Victoria and Australia, such as more frequent and intense droughts, bushfires and heatwaves. Many of these impacts of climate change will hit people facing disadvantage hardest, in part because they have limited capacity to adapt to the changes, for example because they live in poor-quality housing or have little or no insurance. Equally, Victoria’s transition to renewable energy must be socially equitable, for example by creating decent job opportunities in the communities near renewable energy developments, resourcing and implementing clear transition plans to provide ongoing work in communities affected by fossil fuel generator closures, lowering electricity prices for all, and enabling new industries that create green jobs. The transition to renewables presents a major opportunity to bring social, economic and health benefits to Victoria, but this will require careful, long-term planning from the Victorian Government. The sudden closure of Hazelwood Power Station in 2017 demonstrates the perils of leaving such decisions to the private sector, which usually do not have incentives to act in the interests of the general public. Along with job opportunities, the benefits of 100% renewables are likely to include cheaper energy for households and businesses across the state, substantially reduced pollution in the Latrobe Valley and improvements in in-home air quality as a result of removing gas cooking and heating Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Victorian community organisations' submission to the Australian Energy Regulator (AER) 'Regulating Gas Pipelines Under Uncertainty' Information Paper / BSL ; Renew

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Renew.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2022Description: 21 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This joint submission has been prepared by the Renew and Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL), with consultation with other community organisations. We represent residential, and particularly vulnerable, consumers. For households facing financial stress and other forms of disadvantage, ensuring that energy remains affordable while we transition to a zero-carbon economy is crucial. Regulators must ensure that the risks to households are mitigated while facilitating a transition away from fossil gas in line with Australia’s international commitments, including by coordinating with governments and rejecting proposals by energy businesses that increase risk. Although the AER has invited responses to the Information Paper as part of the current Victorian gas network access arrangements, this submission also comments on the general principles raised by the paper, relating to both the Victorian access arrangements and future processes. Given the paper’s indication of a preliminary view that accelerated depreciation ‘would be appropriate if there is sufficient evidence to demonstrate and quantify the pricing risk and stranded asset risk arising from demand uncertainty’, the main focus of this submission is on accelerated depreciation. Our views on the other potential options put forward in the paper are summarised in the Appendix. -- p. 1 ; Contents: Victorian community organisations’ submission to the Australian Energy Regulator (AER) ‘Regulating Gas Pipelines Under Uncertainty’ Information Paper 1 -- Summary 4 -- 1 NETWORK BUSINESSES DO NOT HAVE A REGULATORY ENTITLEMENT TO ACCELERATED DEPRECIATION (OR OTHER MEASURES) TO RESOLVE THE RISKS OF UNCERTAINTY 7 -- 1.1 The stranding risk facing the gas network businesses is not primarily caused by policy decisions 7 -- 1.2 The level of the regulated Rate of Return does not entitle networks to accelerated depreciation 7 -- 1.3 The Revenue and Pricing Principles do not guarantee a return of capital 8 -- 1.4 Consumers bear demand risk through take-or-pay tariff structures 9 -- 2 ACCELERATED DEPRECIATION DOES NOT MANAGE THE RISKS FOR CONSUMERS ASSOCIATED WITH ELECTRIFICATION, AND MAY INCREASE THEM 9 -- 2.1 An electrification scenario poses potential risks, as well as benefits, to residential energy consumers 9 -- 2.2 Accelerated depreciation does not address the risk of electrification for consumers 9 -- 2.2.1 Accelerated depreciation may accelerate disconnection from the gas network, so that early depreciation does not recover contribution from a larger customer base 10 -- 2.2.2 Measures to enable all customers to access electric appliances will be required 10 -- 2.2.3 Measures will be needed to establish a transition schedule for network assets, and to safeguard affordability as the gas network becomes underutilised 10 -- 2.2.4 Other measures will be needed to mitigate the potential impact of electrification on the electricity network 11 2.3 Accelerated depreciation may increase risks for consumers 11 -- 2.3.1 Accelerated depreciation will increase consumer gas tariffs 11 -- 2.3.2 An accelerated unplanned consumer exit from the gas network is more likely to be unmanaged 11 -- 2.3.3 Risk mitigation may make networks more likely to propose inefficient investment 11 -- 2.4 Where assets don’t become stranded, accelerated depreciation will risk the financial viability of network service providers 12 -- 2.5 A continual adjustment of depreciation time frames would be particularly high-risk for customers 12 -- 2.6 Voluntarily exit from the gas network must be better understood, and accounted for 13 -- 3 ADDRESSING UNCERTAINTY WILL REQUIRE CHANGES TO REGULATIONS AND COORDINATION WITH GOVERNMENT 13 -- 3.1 Government support will be needed to manage consumer risks in an electrification scenario, and especially if parts of the network are wound down 13 -- 3.2 The NGO should be revised to include decarbonisation as a core objective 14 -- 3.2.1 The AER should optimise investment to support efficient decarbonisation even without revision to the NGO and NEO (National Electricity Objectives) 14 -- 3.3 The NGL should facilitate optimal energy objectives, not consider gas in isolation 15 -- 3.4 The NGL should not encourage growth in gas connections or consumption 15 -- 4 RISK MITIGATION FOR NETWORK BUSINESSES SHOULD ONLY BE CONSIDERED WHERE CONSUMER RISKS ARE ALSO ADDRESSED 15 --- 4.1 Adequately addressing consumer risks may require negotiation with the networks 15 -- 4.2 The expected timeline for decarbonisation is not a reason to overlook consumer rights in a transition process 16 -- 4.3 Accelerated depreciation should not be considered where networks are being augmented, or new customers are being connected 16 -- 4.4 Accelerated depreciation should not be considered where revenue is being invested in future gas projects 17 --4.5 Accelerated depreciation should not be considered without a framework that establishes appropriate ownership of assets, management of early depreciation payments and Decommissioning at the end of the depreciation timeframe 18 -- 4.6 An adequate framework may also require asset revaluation 18 -- 5 Appendix – Other proposed measures 20 -- 6 References. 21Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Joint submission to the Australian Energy Regulator (AER) from Victorian community organisations re 2023-27 APA Victorian Gas Transmission System Access Arrangement / BSL ; Renew

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Renew.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2022Description: 23 p. PDF.Other title: 2022 Victorian gas access arrangements – joint submission from community organisations.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This joint submission has been prepared by Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL), and Renew, in consultation with other community organisations. We represent residential, and particularly vulnerable, consumers. For households facing financial stress and other forms of disadvantage, ensuring that energy remains affordable while we transition to a zero-carbon economy is crucial. Regulators must ensure that the risks to households are mitigated while facilitating a transition away from fossil gas in line with Australia’s international commitments. This submission represents our preliminary response to the issues presented by the draft proposals – with the possibility that our position may be refined as the process progresses. ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
NDIS workforce final report / Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

by Australia. Parliament. Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme [author,, issuing body.] | Andrews, Kevin James, 1955- [organiser.].

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme, 2022Description: xi, 134 p. PDF.Other title: National Disability Insurance Scheme, NDIS workforce final report.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is one of Australia’s most ambitious public policy initiatives. Critical to the sustainability of the NDIS, is a workforce of sufficient size to meet demand, and which has the appropriate skills, qualifications and expertise to deliver safe, quality supports to participants. It is estimated that the NDIS workforce will need to grow by an additional 83 000 full time equivalent staff to support participants at the scheme’s projected peak. However, attracting and retaining a suitably skilled, qualified workforce continues to prove a significant challenge, with the sector increasingly seen as overworked, underpaid, undervalued and poorly trained. On 9 December 2020, the committee tabled an interim report for this inquiry. Aware that the Australian Government was, at the time, developing a national workforce plan for the NDIS, the report examined the range of issues facing the NDIS workforce, made 14 recommendations on how such matters should be addressed and outlined what the content, scope and focus of the forthcoming NDIS workforce plan should be. The committee welcomed the release of the NDIS National Workforce Plan: 2021-2025 (Workforce Plan; the Plan) in June 2021, along with other measures identified by the Australian Government in response to the committee’s interim report. However, evidence provided to this inquiry has demonstrated that ambitious action is needed to adequately address issues within the NDIS workforce and to safeguard the availability of safe and quality supports for NDIS participants into the future. This second and final report for this inquiry makes eight recommendations to further address such matters. The recommendations relate to: increasing NDIS workforce data collection ; consulting NDIS workers and other key stakeholders in all NDIS pricing review processes ; improving employment opportunities for people with disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people within the workforce ; addressing the funding and resourcing implications of new training and upskilling initiatives ; increasing student placement opportunities within the workforce ; developing clear and measurable outcomes for the initiatives in the NDIS National Workforce Plan 2021-2025; and developing a comprehensive consultation strategy for the implementation of measures under the Workforce Plan. p -- ix Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Model Disability Survey (MDS) : survey manual / WHO ; World Bank

by World Health Organization | World Bank.

Publisher: Geneva, Switzerland : World Health Organization, 2017Description: 138 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The World Health Organization's Model Disability Survey (MDS) Manual is a tool to help implement the MDS in countries and to improve the quality of the interview process. This manual is intended to provide practical information about the survey instruments and their use during interviews. This manual is to be used as a training tool for interviewers when administering the questionnaire. The manual is intended for all parties responsible for implementing the Model Disability Survey and using the resulting data. The various parties include a wide range of people from interviewers, field staff, supervisors and principal investigator(s), laboratory and data entry technicians and statisticians, to public health officials in the Ministry of Health and/or any health institutions. [Introduction] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Orange Book 2022 : policy priorities for the federal government / Danielle Wood, Brendan Coates, Stephen Duckett (GI)

by Wood, Danielle | Grattan Institute | Coates, Brendan | Duckett, Stephen et al.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2022Description: 141 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Briefing Pack | Website (incl chart data) Summary: Elections are times for political parties to articulate their policy vision. And for the 2022 federal election, held in the third year of a global pandemic, a program of bold and well-designed policies is more important than ever. This report sets out the policies we think should be part of that program. [Overview]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Remote Indigenous housing requires ongoing policy focus : submission to the Review of the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement / Michael Dillon (Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research)

by Dillon, Michael | Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.

Canberra, ACT : Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (ANU) 2022Description: iv, 18 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This Topical Issues paper identifies remote Indigenous housing as a structural gap in the nation’s overarching housing policies. The paper reproduces a submission to the current Productivity Commission review of the National Housing and Homelessness Agreement (NHHA) which argues for a much stronger focus to be placed upon remote Indigenous housing in the renewal of the NHHA scheduled for 2023. The submission outlines the extent and systemic underpinnings of the substantial Indigenous housing shortfall in remote Australia and assesses the adequacy of current policy frameworks to meet that need and thus mitigate ongoing adverse social, health and economic consequences. In particular, the submission argues that the national housing target in the National Agreement on Closing the Gap is, in its current form, an inadequate mechanism to address remote housing need. The submission makes a number of specific recommendations designed to ensure that remote Indigenous housing needs are effectively addressed going forward. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Really proper dangerous one : Aboriginal responses to the first wave of COVID-19 in the Kimberley / Kathryn Thorburn ; Kate Golson ; Catherine Ridley et al. (Nulungu Research Institute)

by Thorburn, Kathryn | University of Notre Dame Australia. Nulungu Research Institute | Golson, Kate | Ridley, Catherine et al.

Publisher: Broome : Nulungu Research Institute, The University of Notre Dame Australia, 2022Description: 119 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report brings together both qualitative and quantitative data sources to describe how Aboriginal people and organisations responded to the threat of COVID-19 across the Kimberley in 2020, how the various government policies and approaches rolled out, and how they were received on the ground.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Behind the line : poverty and disadvantage in Australia 2022 / Alan Duncan (Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre)

by Duncan, Alan | Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre.

Publisher: Bentley WA : Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre, 2022Description: 76. p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report, the ninth in the Focus on the States series, provides the latest examination of the prevalence of poverty within Australia, how this has changed over time, and which groups in society face the greatest risks of financial hardship and material deprivation. The report looks at how income poverty has changed through the experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic and examines how Australia’s states and territories compare in the prevalence of poverty and disadvantage. and seek to understand more about people’s journeys into poverty, and the pathways and supports to escape from financial hardship. The measurement of income poverty in the report assesses the number of people whose incomes fall below a poverty line as a representation of a basic living standard. But much of this Focus on the States report looks ‘behind the line’, exploring deeper issues that highlight how poverty affects people’s livelihoods and life chances, and their sense of wellbeing. The report reveals the scarring effects of childhood poverty on life outcomes in adulthood, and shows the extent to which prolonged experiences of poverty affect mental health and exert psychological trauma. It also puts forward for consideration a range of policy recommendations that would go some way to alleviating and assisting people to escape the poverty trap. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Precarious housing and wellbeing : a multi-dimensional investigation / Rachel Ong ViforJ ; Ranjodh Singh ; Emma Baker et al. (AHURI)

by Ong ViforJ, Rachel | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Singh, Ranjodh | Baker, Emma et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2022Description: iv, 54 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This research examines how the bi-directional relationship between housing precariousness and wellbeing varies across population subgroups and over time; sheds light on the dimensions of housing precariousness that affect wellbeing, and vice versa; and considers how policy interventions to effectively minimise negative impacts of precarious housing on wellbeing. Wellbeing is a critical and internationally recognised yardstick of societal progress and policy impact, putting individuals at the centre of evaluation. Precarious housing includes household-based conditions such as forced moves and living in unaffordable housing or overcrowded housing, and area-based precarious housing conditions, such as living in an area of relative socio-economic disadvantage or in a higher crime area. Singles, households with no children, low-income households, private renters and residents of major cities have lower wellbeing when precariously housed compared to when they are not precariously housed. Young people are more likely to fall into or remain in precarious housing than older people. Among the 25–34-years age band, 19 per cent fall into precarious housing and 24 per cent stay in precarious housing from year to year. On the other hand, only 4 per cent of the 65+ years age group fall into precarious housing and just 12 per cent stay in precarious housing from year to year. Unaffordable housing—ranging from an average incidence of 6 per cent to 8 per cent over the study timeframe—is a more common form of housing precariousness than forced moves and overcrowding. The experience of physical violence is a key driver that precipitates a fall into precarious housing or extends a spell of precarious housing [Website].Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
WGEA Review Report : review of the Workplace Gender Equality Act 2012, December 2021 / Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet

by Australia. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : The Department, 2021; © Commonwealth of Australia 2021Description: 96 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: WGEA Review Report.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This report proposes ten recommendations to accelerate progress on gender equality in workplaces and streamline reporting for employers to the Workplace Gender Equality Agency (WGEA). The headline recommendations are: Recommendation 1: make it easier for employers to report to WGEA and improve WGEA’s data collection by enabling WGEA to use data employers have already provided to government and investing in a way to assist employers to extract other data from their own employer systems using a digital solution. It is proposed that a new Gender Data Steering Group led by senior officials will oversee research and stakeholder consultation to drive this work. Recommendation 2: publish organisation gender pay gaps at an employer level – not just at an industry level as currently happens – to accelerate action to close them. Recommendation 3: bridge the ‘action gap’ with new gender equality standards that set targets by requiring large employers (500 or more employees) to commit to, achieve, and report to WGEA on measurable genuine targets to improve gender equality in their workplaces. Recommendation 4: reduce the regulatory burden for employers by replacing and refining particular ‘pain point’ questions in the WGEA reporting components including removing the ‘reporting levels to CEO’ question. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Covid, inequality and poverty in 2020 and 2021 : How poverty & inequality were reduced in the Covid recession and increased during the recovery/ Peter Davidson (ACOSS) (University of New South Wales)

by Davidson, Peter | Australian Council of Social Service | University of New South Wales.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. : Australian Council of Social Services ; UNSW Sydney, 2022Description: 49 p.. : ill. (Online Resource).Other title: A tale of two pandemics : COVID, inequality and poverty in 2020 and 2021.Online Access: Website Summary: This report summarises evidence on the impact of the COVID recession and recovery on income inequality and poverty in Australia, including new ABS data tracking inequality during 2020 and 2021. The data tell a tale of two very different pandemic experiences: In 2020, income inequality and poverty declined during the ‘Alpha’ wave of the pandemic despite the deepest recession in a century and an ‘effective unemployment rate’ reaching 17%, due to robust public income supports – JobKeeper Payment and Coronavirus Supplement. In the first half of 2021, employment and earnings recovered but these income supports were withdrawn. The available evidence indicates that income inequality and poverty increased above pre-pandemic levels. In September 2021, with half the population back under lockdown in response to the ‘Delta’ wave of the pandemic, the effective unemployment rate was 9%. COVID income supports in response to the Delta wave were much weaker, as over 80% of people on the lowest income support payments were excluded from the COVID Disaster payment. Those payments have now been phased out. The legacy of the two pandemic experiences is likely to be higher inequality and poverty than beforehand, despite remarkable progress in reducing both in 2020. By September 2021 there were 1.7 million people on the lowest income support payments (25% more than before the pandemic) and those payments still sit below the poverty line. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Fixing temporary skilled migration : a better deal for Australia / Brendan Coates, Henry Sherrell, and Will Mackey (GI)

by Coates, Brendan | Grattan Institute | Sherrell, Henry | Mackey, Will.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2022Description: 76 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Website (incl chart data) Summary: This report calls for a new visa, the Temporary Skilled Worker (TSW) visa, to replace the existing Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa. Employers would use the Temporary Skilled Worker visa to sponsor workers in any occupation, provided the job pays more than $70,000 a year and the worker is paid at least as much as an Australian doing the same job. Labour agreements, which permit sponsorship for lower-wage jobs, would also be abolished. We calculate that under our plan, the number of full-time jobs eligible for temporary sponsorship would rise from about 44 per cent today to up to 66 per cent. The new TSW visa should be made portable, so temporary skilled migrants could more easily switch sponsoring employers should they find a better job once in Australia. This would enable migrants to walk away from employers who mistreat them. The federal government should better enforce the rules on temporary sponsorship, and uphold the labour rights of sponsored workers. Enforcement today appears almost non-existent. Compliance activities must increase to weed out bad-faith employers who abuse their workers. The Department of Home Affairs should conduct more random audits and invest more capacity in data-matching, to ensure employers are paying sponsored workers what they were promised. Exclusively targeting high-wage jobs for temporary sponsorship would mean sponsorship could be simplified for employers. A monthly fee should replace most upfront costs. Labour-market testing doesn’t work and should be scrapped. Sponsorship should be streamlined foraccredited employers who sponsor especially high-wage workers. A better-targeted, streamlined temporary skilled work visa would lift Australians’ living standards, attract global talent, boost the budget, and reduce exploitation of workers. That’s a good deal for all Australians Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Return to the family safety net? : economic security as Life Chances participants turn 30 / Ursula Harrison and Dina Bowman (SPARC)

by Harrison, Ursula | Brotherhood of St Laurence Social Policy and Research Centre | Bowman, Dina.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 42 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: At a glance: Turning 30 has been associated with the establishment of a career, financial independence, family formation, home ownership and other signifiers of adulthood. Over the past three decades, economic and social change means that these expectations have been shaken and no longer hold true for many 30-year-olds. Of course, families have always provided support, but policy that relies on such support entrenches inequities, as not all families can provide the same level of support. This need to rely on the family safety net is a thread which runs through our examination of economic security among the 30-year-olds in our study. Dive deeper: The longitudinal Life Chances study arose from BSL’s concern about the level of child poverty in Australia and a desire to better understand what affects children’s life chances. It began with the parents of 167 infants born in two suburbs in inner Melbourne in 1990. The children were a representative cross-section of all births in the suburbs at that time (Gilley 1993). Each stage of the study has highlighted the impacts of advantage and disadvantage on life chances. Stage 12 focuses on economic security and financial wellbeing as participants approached 30, a threshold age. This report draws on: 85 About myself survey responses, collected in mid 2019 from the 125 remaining members of the original 167 Life Chances participants 26 interviews conducted in late 2019 (before the COVID-19 pandemic) with the (almost) 30-year-old participants, selected based on gender and childhood family income 14 interviews conducted in 2020 with parents from the original sample, to examine expectations and opportunities in 1990 and 2020. Changes in social and economic policies, and an increasingly targeted and conditional social security system, place greater emphasis on individual responsibility and personal resources, self-reliance and self‑provision. For some 30-year-olds, knowing that they could ‘lean into their privilege’ and call on the family safety net when times were tough, the impacts of financial insecurity were somewhat cushioned. Others did not have the same options, and without secure ongoing employment building a savings buffer or buying a house were retreating dreams. Policies that force a return to reliance on family support, described by Esping-Andersen (1999) as familialism, reinforce intergenerational social inequalities because families with limited resources have less capacity to provide this support. Reversing the drift towards familialism requires a commitment to policies focused on creating a just and equitable future for all. This would see investment in sustainable and inclusive jobs, quality education, affordable health care, housing and child care. It would include providing adequate social security to meet current and future challenges. ; CONTENTS: Summary 4 -- 1 INTRODUCTION 8 -- Changing policy context 8 -- Social and economic policy has increased intergenerational inequalities 12 -- A longitudinal approach can shed light on the impacts of these shifts 13 -- Structure of the report 13 -- 2 STAGE 12 OF THE LIFE CHANCES STUDY 14 -- Recruitment 14 -- Data collection 14 -- Analysis 16 -- Ethics 17 -- Limitations 17 – 3 INEQUALITIES AND THE UNEVEN IMPACTS OF ECONOMIC INSECURITY 18 -- A broken compact between education and employment 19 -- Increasingly conditional income support 22 -- Gendered financial impacts of parenting 24 -- The retreating dream of home ownership 26 -- Financial wellbeing undermined 31 -- 4 DISCUSSION 35 -- The steps to secure work are uncertain 35 -- Patterns of gender inequality persist, especially for parents 35 -- Home ownership is being displaced by investment 35 -- Economic insecurity increases reliance on the family safety net 36 -- 5 CONCLUSION 37 -- A return to the family safety net exacerbates inequality 37 -- Investment in social infrastructure would even up the odds 38 -- Next steps 39 --REFERENCES 40Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
VET as a re-engagement pathway for early school leavers / Patrick Lim (NCVER)

by Lim, Patrick | National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, SA : National Centre for Vocational Education Research, 2022; © Commonwealth of Australia, 2022Description: 44 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: School non-completion and non-completers’ subsequent pathways into employment or back into education are enduring issues for policy-makers in Australia. Understanding the factors that predict a higher probability of leaving school before completing Year 12, as well as those that increase the chance of reengaging with education, can inform action on how best to support young people in their decision-making. An analysis of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) confirms that vocational education and training (VET) is an important pathway to educational re-engagement for young people who leave school before completing Year 12. This analysis also highlights the importance of providing career information not only to young people before and after they leave school, but also to their parents or guardians. For school leavers, having parents with aspirations for them is influential in determining whether early school leavers re-engage with education, demonstrating the value of ensuring that parents also have access to high-quality career information. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Public hearing 10 : education and training of health professionals in relation to people with cognitive disability / Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability

by Australia. Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability.

Publisher: [Brisbane] : Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect & Exploitation of People with Disability. 2022Description: ii, 83 p. PDF.Other title: Education and training of health professionals in relation to people with cognitive disability.Online Access: Research report | Research report (easy read version) | Website Summary: This hearing examined the education and training of health professionals and allied health professionals, including medical practitioners, nurses, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and speech pathologists, in relation to the health care and treatment of people with cognitive disability. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Cry me a river : the tragedy of the Murray-Darling basin / Margaret Simons.

by Simons, Margaret [author.].

Publisher: Carlton, VIC : Black Inc., 2020Description: 150 p.Other title: Quarterly essay. | QE 77 2020.Summary: The Murray-Darling Basin is the food bowl of Australia, and it's in trouble. What does this mean for the future - for water and crops, and for the people and towns that depend on it? In Cry Me a River, acclaimed journalist Margaret Simons takes a trip through the Basin, all the way from Queensland to South Australia. She shows that its plight is environmental but also economic, and enmeshed in ideology and identity. Her essay is both a portrait of the Murray-Darling Basin and an explanation of its woes. It looks at rural Australia and the failure of politics over decades to meet the needs of communities forced to bear the heaviest burden of change. Whether it is fish kills or state rivalries, drought or climate change, in the Basin our ability to plan for the future is being put to the test.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Opening doors : celebrating the work of the Ecumenical Migration Centre 1956 - 2016 / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2016Description: [25 p.] : ill. PDF.Other title: Opening doors.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Ecumenical Migration Centre – which formalised long-held ties with the Brotherhood of St Laurence in 1999 – has been at the forefront of providing practical responses to the challenges of settlement in Australia. This publication captures some highlights over the past 60 years, and in its modest way, offers a mirror to the progress of our diverse nation with its rich waves of migration and refugee settlement that have greatly enhanced our society. The diverse Australians the centre has worked with include European migrants in the 1950s and 1960s, Turkish and Indochinese arrivals in the 1970s and 1980s and, more recently, we have been working with Australians of Middle-Eastern and African descent. I’m proud that my predecessors at the Brotherhood supported the efforts of the precursor European Australian Christian Fellowship in 1956, and then later the union with the Ecumenical Migration Centre. Today, under the banner of the Multicultural Communities Team, we build on this legacy, harnessing community goodwill and volunteer efforts to build cohesion and resilience. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Ask what we want : ensure employment services encourage meaningful work for people with disability / PWDA and the Antipoverty Centre

by O’Connell, Kristin | People with Disability Australia (pwda) | Coonan, Jay | Antipoverty Centre.

Publisher: Surry Hills, Sydney : People with Disability Australia, 2022Description: 88 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Submission (Online Resource) Summary: The issues people with disability face finding long-term sustainable employment are systemic. Our barriers are based in ingrained discrimination in society. Many are the result of accumulated disadvantage that arise from our experiences of education, high rates of poverty, inadequate access to healthcare and exclusion from social participation. Employment services cannot overcome these barriers in isolation. This submission is dedicated to identifying the potential for employment services to support us – people with disability – into sustainable open employment in concert with making other necessary policy changes Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Wirkara Kulpa - Aboriginal youth justice strategy 2022-2032 / Victorian Aboriginal Justice Agreement ; Department of Justice and Community Safety

by Victorian Aboriginal Justice Agreement | Victoria. Department of Justice and Community Safety.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Victorian Government, 2022Description: 60 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Wirkara Kulpa (the Strategy) is the first Aboriginal youth justice strategy in Victoria - it has been developed with the wellbeing of Aboriginal children and young people at its heart. It is a strategy written for and by Aboriginal children and young people and captures the aspirations and changes Aboriginal children and young people want to see in a culturally safe and responsive youth justice system. It is also a strategy that is focused on supporting Aboriginal children and young people so they remain outside the youth justice system and can live culturally rich lives. It has been led by the Aboriginal Justice Caucus, under the umbrella of the Aboriginal Justice Agreement, and is a key initiative of Burra Lotjpa Dunguludja (AJA4), and the Youth Justice Strategic Plan 2020-2030. Like Burra Lotjpa Dunguludja (AJA4), the Strategy aims to further the principle of self-determination and is another important step towards meeting the joint Aboriginal community and Victorian Government commitment to improving justice outcomes for Aboriginal people and closing the gap in the rate of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people under Youth Justice supervision by 2031. It has been developed in parallel with the Koori Youth Justice Taskforce and responds to 56 recommendations of the combined report from the Taskforce and the Our Youth Our Way (2021) Inquiry led by the Commissioner for Aboriginal Children and Young People. The Strategy was developed and led from the outset by the Aboriginal Justice Caucus. This process commenced with a planning workshop in 2018 where Caucus outlined their aspirations for, and approach to, creating Victoria’s first Aboriginal youth justice strategy. Figure 1 is a visual representation of Caucus’ plan developed on that day. -- p. 8 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Covid-19 : housing market impacts and housing policy responses - an international review / Hal Pawson, Chris Martin, Fatemeh Aminpour et al. (ACOSS) (City Futures Research,UNSW)

by Pawson, Hal | Australian Council of Social Service | Martin, Chris | Aminpour, Fatemeh et al | University of New South Wales. City Futures Research Centre.

Publisher: Strawberry Hills, N.S.W. : Australian Council of Social Services ; University of New South Wales, 2022Description: [66 p.] (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report is the third in a series of reports written and produced for the ACOSS/UNSW Sydney Poverty and Inequality Partnership by Hal Pawson, Chris Martin and Fatemeh Aminpour at the City Futures Research Centre at UNSW Sydney along with Kenneth Gibb from the University of Glasgow and Chris Foye from the University of Reading. This report has also received support from Mission Australia, National Shelter (on behalf of NSW Shelter and Shelter WA) and Queensland Shelter. The purpose of this series of reports is to look at the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on housing and homelessness policy. This third report looks at the effects of these policy changes in Australia and other high-income countries including Canada, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, Spain and the US. Studying this range of countries gives the opportunity to compare similar jurisdictions with a variety of housing regimes and national governance systems. ; UNSW Sydney-ACOSS Poverty and Inequality Partnership We extend our sincere gratitude to the ACOSS members and philanthropists who continue to support this vital research partnership, including Anglicare Australia; Australian Red Cross; the Australian Communities Foundation Impact Fund (and three subfunds – Hart Line, Raettvisa and the David Morawetz Social Justice Fund); the BB and A Miller Foundation; the Brotherhood of St Laurence; cohealth, a Victorian community health service; Good Shepherd Australia New Zealand; Mission Australia; the St Vincent de Paul Society; the Salvation Army; and The Smith Family. Includes bibliographical references. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Inclusive Victoria : state disability plan 2022-2026 / Department of Families, Fairness and Housing

by Victoria. Department of Families, Fairness and Housing.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Victorian Government, 2022Description: 82 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: State Disability Plan | State Disability Plan (Easy Read) Summary: Inclusive Victoria: state disability plan (2022–2026) is Victoria’s plan for making things fairer for people with disability. The plan is a key way for the Victorian Government to be accountable for making all parts of the community inclusive and accessible for everyone. This is the fourth state disability plan. -- p.14Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Final report : towards a youth homelessness strategy for Victoria / Tom Alves ; Christian Roggenbuck (AHURI)

by Alves, Tom | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Roggenbuck, Christian.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2021; © Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute Limited Description: ii, 15 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report Summary: The Positioning Paper reviewed the existing Victorian youth homelessness system and policy environment that guides the delivery of support services available to young people experiencing homelessness. Findings of the Positioning Paper showed that the current policy environment has been ineffective in reducing youth homelessness, support systems are fragmented and there are deficits in present service delivery. Recommendations of the Positioning Paper include the need for developing a youth-specific homelessness strategy in Victoria and presents key components that should inform the development of a new strategy and service responses. The findings and recommendations of the Positioning Paper formed the basis of a focused panel discussion between sector leaders and the policy community (Investigative Panel) that considered what strategic policy framework is required to support young people experiencing homelessness in Victoria most effectively Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission re Current Scheme Implementation and Forecasting for the NDIS / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley | Hall, Susan.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 2 p. PDF.Other title: Submission to Joint Standing Committee re Current Scheme Implementation and Forecasting for the NDIS | [Submission to] Committee Secretary. Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) welcomes the opportunity to contribute to this inquiry, drawing on our work with people with disability as well our experience as an NDIS Partner in the Community deliveringLocal Area Coordination and Early Childhood Early Intervention services since 2016. BSL notes the broad nature of the terms of reference (ToR) for this submission. Each aspect of the ToRaddresses parts of the Scheme where comprehensive performance data is not made public. This lack ofavailable data limits the community’s ability to adequately address key issues of Scheme performance. Weare therefore unable to provide a robust response to the Inquiry’s ToR. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission regarding Australian Energy Regulator draft consumer vulnerability strategy consultation paper / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Sullivan, Damian.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 2 p. PDF.Other title: Submission to the Australian Energy Regulator consumer vulnerability paper.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) welcomes this opportunity to comment on the Australian Energy Regulator (AER)’s draft consumer vulnerability strategy. Affordable energy is a basic household requirement to live a dignified life, yet many Australians cannot afford the energy they need. A range of factors in the energy market can contribute to the problem, including the need to use the internet to find and sometimes access the best market offers, creating a barrier to people who have limited internet access or capability; and the complexity of energy market offers, which makes it difficult for many people to compare offers, especially those who do not speak English as a first language, and people who have limited time, numeracy, or energy literacy.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Understanding what attracts new residents to smaller cities / Akshay Vij, Ali Ardeshiri, Tiebei Li et al. (AHURI)

by Vij, Akshay | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Ardeshiri, Ali | Li, Tiebei et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2022Description: v, 66 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This research examines key drivers of migration flows and settlement patterns across Australia and identifies key barriers to and opportunities for greater population decentralisation. This study uses data visualisation techniques to develop a high-level visual understanding of how migration flows have varied historically across different sub-populations, undertakes a macroeconomic analysis of migration patterns as a function of their local economy, infrastructure and natural environment, and develops a microeconomic model of individual preferences for settlement in different urban and regional centres. Migration and settlement patterns in Australia are driven by a combination of factors relating to population size, location, economy, amenities and the environment. In general, roughly three-quarters of those surveyed by the study are willing to move to a mid-sized city under the right circumstances. On average, respondents perceive mid-sized cities to offer significantly better quality of life, and large cities to offer better access to employment and education opportunities, and urban amenities. In the next 50 years, Australia’s population is predicted to double. Much of this growth is expected to be concentrated in major metropolitan centres that are already struggling to provide the requisite infrastructure needed to support their populations. More dispersed population growth strategies could help alleviate some of these urban pressures. However, for these strategies to succeed, the recent decline in regional populations needs to be reversed. In addition, new residents need to be persuaded to move to regional centres. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Connection to community / Pat Dudgeon, Abigail Bray, Shol Blustein et al. (AIHW)

by Dudgeon, Pat | Australian Institute of Health and Welfare | Bray, Abigail | Blustein, Shol et al.

Publisher: Canberra : Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2022Description: vi, 74 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This publication discusses Indigenous understandings of community. It: discusses understandings of what constitutes a healthy connection to community and why this is protective for individuals, families, and the community itself ; reports key information about research, evaluation, program and policy initiatives ; identifies best-practice approaches and critical success factors for implementationAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Paying what it takes : funding indirect cost to create long-term impact / Social Ventures Australia ; Centre for Social Impact

by Social Ventures Australia | Centre for Social Impact.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W : Social Ventures Australia, 2022Description: 52 p. PDF.Online Access: Report | Website Summary: The Paying What It Takes report by Social Ventures Australia (SVA) and the Centre for Social Impact (CSI) has shown that not-for-profits are underinvesting in critical capabilities, due to a pervasive belief that funders are reluctant to provide the full financial support needed to create impact. Solving this issue requires substantial shifts across not-for-profits, philanthropy, government, the public and the media to ask the question – are we paying what it takes? [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Fragmentation & photo-ops: the failures of Australian skills policy through COVID / By Alison Pennington, Centre for Future Work at the Australia Institute

by Pennington, Alison | Australia Institute. Centre for Future Work.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Australian Institute, 2022Description: 49 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: Strong vocational education and training (VET) systems are vital to the success of dynamic, innovative economies and inclusive labour markets. Australia’s VET system once provided well-established and dependable education-to-jobs pathways, but a combination of policy vandalism and fiscal mismanagement plunged the VET system into a lasting and multidimensional crisis. During the pandemic, the federal government has pursued further VET restructuring through the implementation of several wage and training subsidy programs at the cost of several billion dollars. This has deepened the “contestable market” experiment unleashed in the 2000s, by subsidising further decentralisation of course content, delivery and student recruitment to unaccountable for-profit training providers. Meanwhile, more TAFE institutes have been closed and enrolments have continued to decline. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status [Website] / Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet

by Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet.

Publisher: Perth, Western Australia : Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet, 2004-Description: Website.Other title: Overview of Australian Indigenous health.Online Access: Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status (Website) | Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status 2021 (Online Resource) | Summary of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status - selected topics 2021 Summary: The Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health status (the Overview) aims to provide a comprehensive outline of the most recent indicators of the health and current health status of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Purpose, intent and adequacy of the Disability Support Pension / Community Affairs References Committee

by Australia. Parliament. Senate. Community Affairs References Committee | Siewert, Rachel [Chair].

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Community Affairs References Committee, 2022Publisher: © Commonwealth of Australia 2022Description: xix, 125 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Disability Support Pension (DSP) is the Australian Government’s primary income support payment for people with a permanent physical, intellectual or psychiatric impairment that prevents them from fully engaging in employment. Major policy changes to the DSP since 2011 have tightened the eligibility criteria for the payment, reducing the number and rate of successful applications. At the same time, the number of people who receive unemployment payments from the Government, who have a ‘partial capacity to work’ due to disability or illness, has increased. The medical and non-medical requirements make the DSP inaccessible for many applicants. The evidence required to make a claim for the DSP can be difficult to obtain and cost-prohibitive, and the process for applying is long, complex, and not well understood by applicants or treating health professionals. The committee heard that the challenges for people with disability navigating this system are varied, and can be exacerbated by their condition, and personal and financial circumstances. -- p 1 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Closing the Gap : Information repository Productivity Commission

by Australia. Productivity Commission.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Productivity Commission, [2022]Online Access: Website Notes: The Information Repository is produced by the Productivity Commission.Summary: The Closing the Gap Information Repository comes from the National Agreement on Closing the Gap (the Agreement). The purpose of the information repository is to inform reporting on progress in Closing the Gap. The Information Repository includes a Dashboard and annual data compilation report: The Dashboard provides the most up-to-date information available on the targets and indicators in the Agreement. The data will be available in different formats including visual. The annual data compilation report provides a point-in-time snapshot of the Dashboard material. Information about the targets and indicators will be added over time and will include reporting against agreed Priority Reform and socioeconomic outcome targets and indicators Further supporting material will be added over time to build on existing capability in accessing and interpreting the data reported.Availability: (1)
Roundabouts, overpasses, and carparks : hauling the federal government back to its proper role in transport projects / Marion Terrill and Ben Scott (GI)

by Terrill, Marion | Grattan Institute | Scott, Ben.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2022Description: 33 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Website (incl chart data) Summary: The golden sphere for pork-barrelling is surely transport projects. The winners are often concentrated in a single electorate, whereas the losers are taxpayers dispersed across the state or country. The pork-barrelling politicians can tell semi-plausible stories about jobs created and economic opportunities unleashed, and – best of all – there are great hard-hat photo opportunities. But politicians are not supposed to spend public money to promote their private interest, including their private political advantage. This report shows that avoiding such conflicts of interest would be more straightforward if the federal government stuck to its national role, and did its due diligence before spending public money. Pork-barrelling happens year-round, but there’s more of it during election campaigns, when promises are often particularly poorly thought-through. In the 2019 federal campaign, only one of the Coalition’s 71 transport promises valued at $100 million or more had a business case approved by Infrastructure Australia; for Labor, it was two projects of 61. Much of what the federal government spends on transport projects is outside the role that it has agreed with the states. The federal government is supposed to focus on nationally significant infrastructure on the National Land Transport Network, while locally-important roads and rail are the responsibility of state and local governments. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Launch Housing's Inaugural Impact Report 2020-2021 / Launch Housing

by Launch Housing.

Publisher: Collingwood ,Vic. : Launch Housing, 2022Description: 51 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Website Summary: This first impact report by Launch Housing, begins to tell the story of what has changed for people, community and society in Melbourne as a result of Launch Housing’s work this year, along with their understanding of what has influenced those changes. Launch Housing tell this story through their ten impact measures combined with stories of what this means on the ground. – p.5Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Disability Toolkit for Policy [website] / Office for Disability Issues

by Office for Disability Issues.

Publisher: Wellington, NZ : Office for Disability Issues , 2022Description: Webpage.Online Access: Website Summary: A disability analysis tool to help you as a policy practitioner to explore the disability implications of your policy as you move through the policy process. This toolkit is designed to help you provide frank and robust advice to decision-makers through the inclusion of a disability lens. For New Zealand to be a non-disabling society, we need policy and decision-makers to consider how their interventions can create a place where disabled people have an equal opportunity to achieve their goals and aspirations. This toolkit will show you how. This toolkit is a live document and will be updated regularly to reflect social and political context. We recommend you consult this toolkit regularly to keep up to date. This current version was released in February 2022 [website].Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Current Scheme Implementation and Forecasting for the NDIS / Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

by Australia. Parliament. Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme | Andrews, Kevin [Chair].

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. : [Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme] 2022Publisher: © Commonwealth of Australia 2022Description: viii, 93 .p PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Joint Standing Committee on the National Disability Insurance Scheme (the committee) was established by resolution of the House of Representatives on 4 July 20191 and Senate on 22 July 2019.2 The committee is composed of five members and five senators, and is tasked with reviewing: (a) The implementation, performance and governance of the NDIS; (b) The administration and expenditure of the NDIS; and (c) Such other matters in relation to the NDIS as may be referred to it by either House of Parliament. The committee is required to present a report to the Parliament on the activities of the committee after 30 June each year, in addition to reporting on any other matters it considers relevant. From December 2020 to October 2021 the committee conducted an inquiry into independent assessments under the NDIS. During this inquiry, the committee heard a range of views in relation to the projected scheme costs of the NDIS. These included concerns raised by federal NDIS ministers and the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) that projected scheme costs posed risks to the long-term sustainability of the scheme. Other submitters however, expressed scepticism about the actuarial data used to argue that there are issues with scheme sustainability, and noted a range of other factors influencing scheme projections. In consideration of the evidence already presented to the inquiry into independent assessments, the committee decided to conclude that inquiry and initiate a new inquiry with focussed terms of reference to examine some of the broader questions concerning the implementation of the NDIS to date and projections about its future. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Services, support and life outcomes for autistic Australians / Select Committee on Autism

by Australia. Parliament. Senate. Select Committee on Autism | Hughes, Hollie [Chair].

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. : [Select Committee on Autism], 2022Publisher: © Commonwealth of Australia 2022Description: xvii, 393 .p PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The evidence provided over the course of this inquiry provides a compelling case for change. Autistic Australians and their families are often discriminated against and have difficulty accessing the services and supports that they need. Maintaining the status quo is simply not an option. At the centre of the committee's proposed reform pathway is a National Autism Strategy. This strategy would coordinate efforts to improve life outcomes for autistic people and have clear and measurable goals by which progress could be tracked. The committee envisages that the national strategy would be complemented by a series of action plans and roadmaps for specific areas—such as health and mental health, advocacy, employment, research, and the service delivery workforce. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Strategic Framework and Implementation Plan 2021-2031 / Department of Health

by Australia. Department of Health.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT. The Department, 2022Description: 155 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This plan is guided by 6 overarching strategic directions. These directions support the ongoing development of the size, capability and capacity of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce. The strategic directions are: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are represented and supported across all health disciplines, roles and functions. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workforce has the necessary skills, capacity and leadership across all health disciplines, roles and functions. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are employed in culturally safe and responsive workplace environments that are free of racism across health and all related sectors. There are sufficient numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students studying and completing health qualifications to meet the future health care needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health students have successful transitions into the workforce and access clear career pathway options. Information and data are provided and shared across systems to assist health workforce planning, policy development, monitoring and evaluation, and continuous quality improvement. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander treaties, constitutional and legal recognition and representation in Australia : a chronology / James Haughton and Apolline Kohen (Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. Parliamentary Library)

by Haughton, James | Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. Parliamentary Library | Kohen, Apolline.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. : Department of the Parliamentary Library, 2022Description: 59 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The issues of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander inclusion in law, governance and the Constitution have a long history that can be tracked back to the establishment of the first colonies. In the context of current debates on whether and how to best progress constitutional recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, this paper aims to provide a brief history and chronology of the recognition, representation and treaty movements, highlighting the numerous attempts by a variety of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals and organisations, non-government organisations and governments to effect a lasting change. This paper covers the period from Captain James Cook's original instructions in 1776 to 2021. This chronology focuses on the development over time of the movement towards political rights such as voting rights, constitutional recognition and representative mechanisms and the related and interlinked treaty movements. It aims to gather key documents and developments together so as to facilitate current policy discussions. It includes some other aspects of Indigenous governance (including the issues of land rights, sovereignty and reparations), where they directly apply to the reconciliation and treaty debates, and selected court cases that directly touch upon clauses of the Constitution which have been proposed to be altered by referendum, such as significant exercises of the ‘Race power’ (section 51(xxvi)) or the ‘Territories power’ (section 122) (see below for an outline of these powers). [Introduction] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Deserts and oases : how accessible is childcare in Australia? / Peter Hurley, Hannah Matthews, Sue Pennicuik (Mitchell Institute)

by Hurley, Peter | Victoria University. Mitchell Institute for Health and Education Policy | Matthews, Hannah | Pennicuik, Sue.

Melbourne : Victoria University. Mitchell Institute for Health and Education Policy, 2022Description: 39 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Other title: Childcare deserts & [and] oases: how accessible is childcare in Australia?.Online Access: Website Summary: Access to quality childcare is increasingly critical to Australian children, families and the economy. There are many anecdotal reports of families having difficulty finding appropriate childcare services, especially in regional Australia and some parts of our major cities. However, there is a lack of evidence exploring the nature and extent of the problem. This report aims to help to fill this evidence gap by examining access to childcare in Australia. In this report, we are focussing on one type of childcare - centre-based day care, which is subsidised by the Commonwealth Child Care Subsidy (CCS) and is the service most used by children and families. We measured the supply of childcare in almost every part of the country and compared this to the potential demand – the number of children who living in each neighbourhoods. We used spatial measurement techniques that enabled us to determine the relative accessibility of childcare in Australia and to determine where there are childcare deserts and oases. Our analysis shows that where you live matters. Families in regional areas are the most at risk of suffering from poor access. There are also concerning correlations between access to childcare and socio-economic status. Our analysis highlights that Australia needs new policy approaches to ensure that all Australian families can access the benefits of high quality childcare. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Don't take it as read : inquiry into adult literacy and its importance / House of Representatives Standing Committee on Employment, Education and Training

by Australia. Parliament. House of Representatives Standing Committee on Employment, Education and Training | Laming, Andrew [Chair].

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. : [House of Representatives Standing Committee on Employment, Education and Training] 2022Description: xxviii, 184 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The House of Representatives Standing Committee on Employment, Education and Training will inquire into and report on adult literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills in Australia, including but not limited to: the relationship between adult literacy, numeracy and problem-solving skills and socio-demographic characteristics, particularly migrant status, First Nations status and individuals living in households that have experienced intergenerational unemployment ; the effect that literacy and numeracy skills have on an individual’s labour force participation and wages ; links between literacy and social outcomes such as health, poverty, ability to care for other family members and participation in civic life ; the relationship between parents’ literacy skills and their children’s education and literacy skill development from birth to post-secondary education ; whether changes to schooling in 2020 as a result of COVID-19 will have a disproportionate impact on the skill development of those children of parents with lower literacy and numeracy levels, and, if yes, consideration of appropriate remediation programs which might address this ; the availability, impact and effectiveness of adult literacy and numeracy educational programs in Australia and internationally; international comparisons of government policies and programs that may be adapted to the Australian experience -- xvAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Administration of the JobKeeper Scheme Australian National Audit Office

by Australia. Department of the Treasury Australian Taxation Office. Australian National Audit Office.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT Australian National Audit Office 2022Description: 85 p. ill: graphs, charts.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This audit was conducted under phase two of the ANAO’s multi-year strategy that focuses on the effective, efficient, economical and ethical delivery of the Australian Government’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The JobKeeper scheme was a key measure in the Australian Government’s economic response to the COVID-19 pandemic and has affected a significant number of employees and businesses: Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
A Fairer Tax and Welfare System for Australia Centre for Social Research and Methods, ANU

by Phillips, Ben | Australian National University. Centre for Social Research and Methods | Webster, Richard.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T Australian National University. Centre for Social Research and Methods 2022Description: 37 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: April 2022Summary: This research paper was commissioned by the St Vincent de Paul Society National Council of Australia Inc. as an initiative to help address the growing gap between ‘the haves’ and ‘the have nots’ in Australia. The paper proposes three simple policy proposals designed to improve the financial position of Australians most in need. The groups at most risk of deep poverty and financial stress are identified as persons receiving JobSeeker payments and working age pensions, defined in this paper as including Disability Support Pension, Parenting Payments (Single) and Carer Payments. Other groups also linked to poverty and financial stress are renters, single parents and young persons. Additional spending is targeted to these groups to maximise reductions in poverty and financial stress and we estimate would lower poverty by up to a million people or 470,000 households. The proposed policy changes add to the equity of the existing welfare system, providing extra assistance to those who are most likely to be in deep poverty and financial stress. Increases are proposed to JobSeeker, Parenting Payment (Single), Disability Support Pension and Carer Payment along with increases to low-income renters through increased Commonwealth Rent Assistance (CRA). The most generous policy proposal includes an increase to Family Tax Benefits.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Scarring effects of the pandemic economy : COVID-19's ongoing impact on jobs, insecurity and social services in Victoria / ACU ; CSSV & St Mary's HOW

by Barnes, Tom | Australian Catholic University | Scott Doidge | Australian Catholic University. Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences | Australian Catholic University. ACU Engagement | Catholic Social Services Victoria | St Mary's House of Welcome.

Publisher: [Melbourne] Australian Catholic University 2022Description: 64 p. ill: charts ; graphs.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Australian Catholic University website Notes: This is the final report delivered to Catholic Social Services Victoria and St Mary’s House of Welcome for a project conducted through Australian Catholic University’s (ACU) Stakeholder Engaged Scholarship Unit (SESU).Summary: The report addresses how the ongoing COVID-19 crisis will affect demand for social services in Victoria. Based on analysis of economic data from public and private agencies, it offers projections for FY2021/22 and FY2022/23, as well as parallel analyses for Greater Melbourne and regional Victoria. This report finds that: 1. The COVID-19 crisis is not just a pandemic in public health terms—it is also a pandemic of job loss and job market insecurity. 2. The Federal Government’s economic response to COVID-19 was based on the exclusion of temporary migrants from basic social protection. 3. Despite low unemployment figures and political rhetoric, Victoria has experienced a weak and uneven economic recovery since 2020—a recovery which was stunted further by the experience of the Delta Wave. 4. COVID-19 has profoundly affected the activities of social service providers in Victoria. Even during the current recovery phase, the pandemic has left a social and economic ‘scarring’ effect on those experiencing the most vulnerability or marginalisation, on victims of job loss and labour market. In conclusion, these findings point to the need for: • a significant and meaningful rise in key welfare transfers, including and especially JobSeeker; • renewed government investment in, and expansion of, public and social housing; • ongoing and expanded funding for social service providers, including providers of emergency relief, accommodation and related services, due to the shortfall of volunteers and the significantly greater burden on active volunteers working in the community.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Australia's COVID-19 pandemic housing policy responses / Chris Leishman, Fatemeh Aminpour, Emma Baker et al. (AHURI)

by Leishman, Chris | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Aminpour, Fatemeh | Baker, Emma et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2022Description: v, 71 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This research reviewed Australia’s COVID-19 housing policy responses to better understand their intervention approach, underlying logic, short and long term goals, target groups and level of success. It considered literature and policy from Australia and a small number of international comparator policies; conducted online surveys of landlords and of economists; and consulted key stake holders. Given Australia’s federated system of government, considerable differences quickly emerged between intervention approaches across states and territories. This was also driven by the extent to which different jurisdictions were impacted by the spread of the virus, the extent and frequency of lockdowns, and damage to state/local economies. The national and state policy measures implemented to support home ownership achieved the desired goal of providing short-term stimulus to the residential building sector and support to the broader economy. However, a range of anticipated and unforeseen consequences have precipitated as a result of concentrated demand-side subsidies, low interest rates and flexible lending conditions. The establishment of an agile infrastructure to support information sharing will support more effective and innovative housing policy development in the future. The state-to-state infrastructure and approaches that were developed rapidly and which supported jurisdictional responses to COVID-19 provide a template for a shelf-ready policy-sharing practice that warrants supported development across governments. This could usefully include local government as well as state and territory and national tiers of governance. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
A supercharged climate : rain bombs, flash flooding and destruction / Martin Rice, Lesley Hughes, Will Steffen et al. (Climate Council)

by Rice, Martin | Climate Council | Hughes, Lesley | Steffen, Will et al.

Publisher: [Potts Point, N.S.W.] : Climate Council of Australia, 2022Description: i, 26 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The relentless deluge that has lasted days and flooded towns and cities along southeast Queensland and northeast New South Wales is record-breaking. It has caused tragic loss of life and submerged tens of thousands of homes and businesses. The devastation was compounded further south in New South Wales on 3 March 2022, when almost half a million people were under evacuation orders or warnings as floods hit Sydney. At the time of publication, the flooding event was still unfolding. The loss of lives, damage to property, economic losses, and impact on human and animal health and well-being will only be fully accounted for over time. For many communities dealing with flood emergencies, this is the latest in a long line of climate change-driven extreme weather events they have faced in recent years, including unprecedented drought, unprecedented Black Summer bushfires, unprecedented powerful storms, and unprecedented scorching heatwaves. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Unlocking the potential of Australian apprenticeships / David Longley and Kira Clarke (SPARC)

by Longley, David | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Social Policy and Research Centre | Clarke, Kira.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Despite being the most common form of employment-based training, Australian apprenticeships are not living up to their promise. In this paper, the first of a new series, Skills and training for young people, the authors explore the weaknesses of the current system and propose a new approach, based on international evidence, that can make a difference to opportunities for young Australians. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Keeping kids safe and well - your voices / Susan Nicolson, Susan Newell, Sorrell Palmer et al. (Australian Human Rights Commission)

by Nicolson, Susan | Australian Human Rights Commission | Newell, Susan | Palmer, Sorrell et al.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Australian Human Rights Commission 2021; © Australian Human Rights Commission 2021Description: 198 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The vision of Safe and Supported: The National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children 2021–2031 (the National Framework) is that ‘children and young people in Australia reach their full potential by growing up safe and supported, free from harm and neglect’. ‘Listening and responding to the voices and views of children and young people, and the views of those who care for them’ is one of the six underlying principles of the new National Plan. As Australia’s National Children’s Commissioner, I was asked to consult with children, young people and families to inform the first five-year action plans. Hearing the insights and experiences of those whom the National Framework is meant to be helping will assist in building better policies and enable us to monitor their effectiveness. They are experts in their own lives and understanding the complexity of issues through their insights is critical. This report synthesises the views of children, young people and families collected in face-to-face and online consultations and surveys. It presents key issues, identifies priorities, and recommends actions about how these can be incorporated into the action plans to be developed by the Australian, State and Territory Governments Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to the Disability Royal Commission on Australian Disability Enterprises (ADEs) / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley | Thies, Andrew | Wakeford, Michelle.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 12 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: We recommend the Commonwealth Government transition from supporting employment of people with disability in Australian Disability Enterprises (ADEs) towards supporting open employment. Open employment offers better scope than ADEs to promote the social and economic inclusion of people with disability because it pays decent wages, offers more upskilling and career development opportunities, and is aligned with person-centred approaches and interventions that build the capabilities of people with disability as well as employers. We further recommend the Commonwealth Government adopt a systemic approach to supporting the transition towards open employment of people with disability. A systemic approach would require the Government to: • diversify its policy toolkit, including by adopting more demand-side approaches to employment of people with disability • promote best-practice employment policy by funding and commissioning open employment services and supports • build the capabilities of government agencies, employers, and employment service providers to support open employment • tackle negative attitudes towards people with disability by adopting a presumption that all people with disability are able to work in open employment settings [summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The economic benefits of high- quality universal early child education / By Matt Grudnoff ; Australia Institute. Centre for Future Work

by Grudnoff, Matt | Australia Institute. Centre for Future Work.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Australian Institute, 2022Description: 47 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Other title: Economic Benefits of ECEC in Australia.Online Access: Website Summary: A universal ECEC system should be viewed as a fundamental goal for the future Australian economy. Achieving the superior quality and economic benefits of the Nordic systems cannot be done instantly, of course. But our ECEC policies should be reoriented and expanded, with a universal, publicly-delivered, high-quality, and affordable system akin to the Nordic benchmark as its end goal. That will require more substantial investments in ECEC funding, and its reallocation toward the not-for-profit and public facilities which deliver the best quality, and the largest economic benefits. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Clean Energy Australia Report 2022 / Clean Energy Council

by Clean Energy Council.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Clean Energy Council, 2022Description: 93 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: 2022 Report | Website Summary: The report covers the latest key figures and statistics on the national energy market. It is the only analysis that includes the National Electricity Market, the Western Australian electricity grid and other major regional grids across the country in areas such as the Northern Territory. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Ticket to Work : valuation of key outcomes / Social Ventures Australia Consulting

by Social Ventures Australia Consulting | Social Ventures Australia | Ticket to Work.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W Social Ventures Australia : 2020Description: 38 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This report draws on the data from that study to estimate two scenarios: a Ticket to Work scenario and a ‘Business as Usual’ scenario based on data about employment outcomes for young people with disability who did not participate in Ticket to Work. Figure 1 demonstrates the impact of Ticket to Work: far more participants are in the labour force, employed, and in open employment than would otherwise have been the case. -- page 1Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The lost years : counting the costs of climate inaction in australia / Climate Council

by Climate Council.

Publisher: [Potts Point, N.S.W.] : Climate Council of Australia, 2022; © Climate Council of Australia Ltd 2022Description: v, 72 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Climate Council’s new report “The Lost Years: Counting the costs of climate inaction in Australia” provides a detailed overview of the Federal Government’s approach to climate change since the election of the Liberal-National Coalition in 2013. The Climate Council has assessed the Federal Government’s climate performance over the past eight years in detail and finds there’s been a complete and catastrophic failure to act on the climate crisis. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Trends and needs in the Australian child welfare workforce : an exploratory study / Erica Russ, Louise Morley, Mark Driver et al. ; ACU Institute of Child Protection Studies

by Russ, Eric | Australian Catholic University. Institute of Child Protection Studies | Morley, Louise | Driver Mark et al.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : ACU Institute of Child Protection Studies, 2022; © Australian Catholic University 2022Description: 75 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This report presents findings from an exploratory study that examined broad-ranging, publicly available data to investigate emerging trends, issues and needs in the child welfare workforce and the educational profile of the workforce.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Child care package evaluation : final report / J.Rob Bray, Jennifer Baxter, Kelly Hand et al. ; Australian Institute of Family Studies

by Bray, J. Rob [author.] | Australian Institute of Family Studies [issuing body] | Baxter, Jennifer [author.] | Hand, Kelly et al [author.] | Australian Department of Education, Skills and Employment [commissioning body.].

Publisher: Southbank, Victoria : Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2022Description: xxiv, 361 p. : col. ill. PDF.Other title: Child care package evaluation.Online Access: Report | Website Summary: Child care plays an important economic and social role in Australia. For parents, it supports their participation in employment, education and training. For children, quality care can support child development, particularly for vulnerable and disadvantaged children and their families. In recognition of its importance, child care in Australia is substantially subsidised by the Australian Government via fee subsidies and some specific direct funding to some services. Child care services are regulated in relation to quality and other aspects of their operation. In July 2018 the Australian Government introduced the ‘Child Care Package’ as a significant reform to child care provision and funding. It involved a major restructuring of subsidies and a range of other measures, and significant additional government expenditure. The core objectives of the Package are to support families to be able to access quality early learning, enable and encourage greater workforce participation and simplify child care payments, and targeting assistance to low and middle income families. Its goal was for child care to be ‘simpler, more affordable, more accessible and more flexible’. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Ticket to Work [website] / Ticket to Work ; BSL

by Ticket to Work | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: [Fitzroy,Vic] : Brotherhood St Laurence, [2022.]Online Access: Ticket to Work Website Notes: Ticket to Work works to improve employment opportunities and outcomes for young people with disability. The initiative grew out of research that showed participation in work and career experience during secondary school are key indicators of post-school success for young people with disability. Work is a fundamental part of adult life. It gives us a sense of purpose and a feeling of worth; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Because work is so essential, students with disability must not be deprived the opportunity to explore employment pathways in their transition to adulthood. Ticket to Work does not provide direct services to young people with disability or their families. We encourage people to use our website to learn more about evidence based practice in school to work transition. Ticket to Work has a podcast series that explores the 'world of work' for young people with disability. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Youth unemployment and the pandemic / Eliza Littleton and Rod Campbell (Australia Institute)

by Littleton, Eliza | Australia Institute | Campbell, Rod.

Publisher: Manuka, A.C.T. : The Australia Institute, 2022Description: [55 p.] (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: Young Australians have been disproportionately impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Young people make up just 14% of the workforce but bore 55% of the job losses during the 2021 lockdowns. This crisis has compounded decades of high youth unemployment and underemployment. Now is the time for long-term policies to help and protect young people in the labour market. [Website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The wisdom of women and workers: practice considerations for designing assertive outreach services for women experiencing homelessness / Tamara Blakemore, Louise Dean, Graeme Stuart et al. (Nova for Women and Children) (University of Newcastle)

by Blakemore, Tamara [Author.] | Nova for Women and Children | Dean, Louise [Author.] | Stuart, Graeme et al [Author.] | University of Newcastle.

Publisher: Callaghan : University of Newcastle. 2022Description: 72 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Report (Online Resource) Summary: Assertive outreach practice is distinguished by the situations and settings in which workers come into contact, and work with, people needing support. In practice, assertive outreach usually means taking services to people and working with them where they are at. Assertive outreach approaches to homelessness are often used with people experiencing chronic or cyclic homelessness. Assertive outreach models of practice, particularly as they apply to people sleeping rough, have been a mainstay of community-based crisis and case management responses in Australia for much of the past three decades. However, assertive outreach policy and practice has largely focused on the visible, and hence male, experience of homeless. When Nova identified a gap in female focused delivery of assertive outreach for women experiencing homelessness, they undertook this project to ensure their response was not only ‘evidence’ informed, but also informed by the voices of women. The project team believed it was vital that we heard from women who were experiencing homelessness, and the people who worked with them, when creating a female focused, person centred model of assertive outreach models for women. This report presents the outcomes of the project undertaken between Nova and the University of Newcastle [Executive Summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Child care package evaluation : early monitoring report / Jennifer Baxter, J. Rob Bray, Megan Carroll et al. ; Australian Institute of Family Studies

by Baxter, Jennifer | Australian Institute of Family Studies [issuing body] | Bray, J. Rob | Carroll, Megan et al | Australian Department of Education, Skills and Employment [commissioning body.].

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2019Description: xiv, 148 p. : col. ill. PDF.Other title: Child care package evaluation.Online Access: Report | Website Summary: This early monitoring report is the first formal evaluation report. In addition to presenting early data about the transition for services and families it provides context for the reform package through a review of the history of child care in Australia and a detailed overview of child care provision and the nature and objectives of the Child Care Package at the point of implementation of the package. This context will be increasingly important as the evaluation progresses as a point of reference for understanding the progress and impacts of the reforms. This report also provides baseline data on families with children and services, their expectations of about how the new system might work, their assessment of their readiness for the changes and some very initial data on the transition including parental labour supply responses and the costs of child care for families. The timing of this report means that it is only considering the immediate post‑implementation period. It also means only limited administrative and other program data were available to the evaluation, and thus it is too early to assess the medium to long term effects. – page 2 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Regulating gas pipelines under uncertainty : information paper / Australian Energy Regulator (AER)

by Australian Energy Regulator (AER).

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Australian Energy Regulator (AER), 2021Description: xi, 71 p. : ill PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This information paper aims to assist stakeholders to understand how the energy transition currently underway affects regulated gas networks and its implications for the economic regulation of gas pipelines and networks and, in turn, the implications for consumers. We outline a range of possible options to manage pricing risk and stranded asset risk arising from a potential material decline in gas demand in the long term. Not all the options considered are accommodated within the current regulatory framework. Some options may require a change to the regulatory framework or the way regulated businesses price their services. We explore the merits and costs of each option and note that a combination of the options may be appropriate depending on the regulated business’s circumstances. We also analyse how the uncertainty in future demand may affect our assessment of network expenditures going forward and the incentives provided under the current regulatory framework. The information provided and the issues raised in this paper should facilitate informed engagement between gas consumers, regulated businesses, governments and the AER. In particular, we see the information paper as being a crucial input into the upcoming Victorian gas transmission and distribution access arrangement reviews. Therefore, we invite stakeholders to participate in upcoming gas access arrangement reviews, and the processes leading up to those reviews, and provide feedback on how we can best respond to the changes in the energy sector in a way that is consistent with the National Gas Objective (NGO). This can be done through written submissions, engagement in public forums or through discussions with the AER. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Tents to castles : building comfortable and more affordable Aussie homes / Carl Tidemann, Nicki Hutley, Morgan Koegel (Climate Council )

by Tidemann, Carl | Climate Council | Hutley, Nicki | Koegel, Morgan.

Publisher: Potts Point : Climate Council of Australia Limited, 2022Description: iv, 45 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Low energy efficiency standards have left too many Australians living in poorly-made homes equated to “glorified tents”, which are stifling during summer and freezing in winter. Making new Australian buildings, including homes, more energy efficient will directly save homeowners hundreds of dollars every year in energy bills, and also cut network costs for all energy users. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
A roadmap for Australian investors : how to invest to achieve gender equity, racial equity, diversity and inclusion / Sally McCutchan, Manita Ray, Sabina Curatolo et al. (Capital Human) (Impact Investing Australia)

by McCutchan, Sally | Capital Human | Ray, Manita | Curatolo, Sabina et al | Impact Investing Australia (IIA).

Publisher: Melbourne,Vic. : Impact Investing Australia, 2022Description: 214 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Investors can play a critical role in achieving gender equity, racial equity, diversity and inclusion outcomes. Investing to achieve these outcomes presents investors of all types with significant opportunities for improving investment performance, uncovering new investment opportunities and reducing risks. Globally and in Australia, there is a growing trend of investors who are adopting a genderlens within their organisations, in investment processes and through their influence. – p.8Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
No-one left behind : supporting people with complex needs on universal credit / Henry Parkes (Institute for Public Policy Research)

by Parkes, Henry | Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR).

Publisher: London, U.K. : Institute for Public Policy Research, 2022Description: [30 p.] : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: For the UK social security system to provide an effective social safety net, it must work for everyone. Navigating the benefits system and the bureaucracy within it can be demanding for those who rely on it. It is not simply a case of ‘signing on’ and receiving a payment; there are significant strings attached. In most cases, the claimant must demonstrate that they are taking steps to improve their chances of finding work (for example, by applying for jobs or undertaking training) in what is referred to as conditionality. If the conditions of a person’s benefit are not considered to have been met, this can lead to partial or complete withdrawal of income they rely on through benefit sanctions. The conditions claimants must meet are supposed to be tailored to the circumstances of the individual. This makes sense. People’s lives and circumstances are complex and what may constitute reasonable job search requirements for one person on out-of-work universal credit (UC) could be completely unachievable for another. In some cases, job searches might be entirely inappropriate as there may be much bigger issues affecting that individual which need to be resolved first – such as securing a roof over their head – before turning their attention to looking for or preparing for work. In fact, pressurising such groups to look for work could be entirely counter-productive. Other aspects of a claim can also be tailored to an individual, such as how frequently they are paid, or whether they can access emergency financial support and the conditions on which they will pay it back. But this tailored approach does not always happen in reality. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Ticket to Work submission to the New Disability Employment Support Model : focus on young people with disability / Ticket to Work

by Ticket to Work.

Publisher: [Fitzroy,Vic] : [Ticket to Work,] 2022Description: 25 p. PDF.Other title: New Disability Employment Support Model.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Ticket to Work aims to improve open employment participation in Australia by working collaboratively, advocating for systemic change, and providing an architecture for optimal employment and career achievement for young people with disability . We would welcome the opportunity to put in a submission and happy to provide further information regarding our submission and to work with the DSS to ensure young people with disability are able to successfully transition into decent employment. www.Tickettowork.org.au This submission provides a background to the current situation that young people with disability find themselves in. It also provides guidance on the way forward,drawing on our Ticket to Work experience and other relevant research. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Testosterone rex : unmaking the myths of our gendered minds / Cordelia Fine.

by Fine, Cordelia [author.].

Publisher: London : Icon Books, 2017Description: 265 p.Other title: Testosterone rex.Notes: Includes index.Summary: Testosterone Rex is the powerful myth that squashes hopes of sex equality by telling us that men and women have evolved different natures. Fixed in an ancestral past that rewarded competitive men and caring women, these differences are supposedly re-created in each generation by sex hormones and male and female brains.Testosterone, so we're told, is the very essence of masculinity, and biological sex is a fundamental force in our development. Not so, says psychologist Cordelia Fine, who shows, with wit and panache, that sex doesn't create male and female natures. Instead, sex, hormones, culture and evolution work together in ways that make past and present gender dynamics only a serving suggestion for the future - not a recipe.Testosterone Rex brings together evolutionary science, psychology, neuroscience and social history to move beyond old 'nature versus nurture' debates, and to explain why it's time to unmake the tyrannical myth of Testosterone Rex.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Leading mindfully : how to focus on what matters, influence for good, and enjoy leadership more / Amanda Sinclair.

by Sinclair, Amanda, 1953- | ProQuest (Firm).

Publisher: Sydney : Allen & Unwin, 2016Description: vi, 229 p.Summary: A guide to cultivating everyday mindfulness for leaders seeking to make their organisations and workplaces productive, fulfilling and enjoyable places to be.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
No more business as usual : the need for participatory Indigenous development policy And skilled practice / Janet Hunt and Toni Bauman (Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research)

by Hunt, Janet | Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research | Bauman, Toni.

Canberra, ACT : Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (ANU) 2022Description: v, 33 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This paper explores what is required to enable First People to be genuinely able to participate in their own development in line with their right to self-determination and free prior and informed consent. It examines current major directions and opportunities in government policies and argues that ‘business as usual’ processes of engagement and communication will need to change significantly if people are to experience genuine participation in any place-based processes. It finishes with a call for new institutional support to enable effective participatory development to occur. [Abstract]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Homes for people : how Nordic policies can improve Australia's housing affordability / Andrew Scott, Sidsel Grimstad, Heather Holst (Australia Institute. Nordic Policy Centre)

by Scott, Andrew | Australia Institute. Nordic Policy Centre | Grimstad, Sidsel | Holst, Heather.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Australian Institute, 2022Description: 23 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This report brings together three essays from writers with knowledge of Australian and Nordic social policy, with a focus on housing and homelessness.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Rental Affordability Snapshot / Anglicare Australia

by Anglicare Australia.

Publisher: Ainslie, ACT Anglicare Australia 2011 -Description: PDF.Online Access: National Report (April 2022) | Regional Reports (April 2022 ) | Website Notes: The Rental Affordability Snapshot is designed to highlight the lived experience of looking for housing while on a low income. It focuses on the Australian population who earn the least income – Commonwealth benefit recipients and minimum wage earners. Every year, Anglicare Australia tests if it is possible for people on low incomes to rent a home in the private market. We do this by taking a snapshot of the thousands of properties listed for rent on realestate.com.au. We test whether each property is affordable and suitable for people on low incomes. We are grateful for the support of REA Group for giving us access to the property listings data from realestate.com.au every year to enable us to do this research effectively. ; Report released annually. Link to most recent edition Summary: The Rental Affordability Snapshot is designed to highlight the lived experience of looking for housing while on a low income. It focuses on the Australian population who earn the least income – Commonwealth benefit recipients and minimum wage earners.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Housing delayed and denied : NDIA decision-making on Specialist Disability Accommodation funding / Mitchell Skipsey, Di Winkler, Michelle Cohen et al. (Public Interest Advocacy Centre) (Housing Hub)

by Skipsey, Mitchell | Public Interest Advocacy Centre | Winkler, Di | Cohen, Michelle et al | Housing Hub.

Publisher: Sydney, Vic. : Public Interest Advocacy Centre, 2022; Melbourne Vic. : Housing Hub (Summer Foundation), 2022; © 2022, Public Interest Advocacy Centre and Housing HubDescription: 52 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: In the past year, NDIS participants and providers have seen an increasing number of people who requested SDA funding from the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA, Agency) receive decisions that do not align with their needs and preferences. Agency decisions have become inconsistent with the NDIA’s guidelines, and previous funding decisions for participants with similar functional capacity and support needs. The resulting uncertainty around eligibility criteria and opaque administrative processes causes stress and frustration for participants, their family and friends, and providers. In order to understand and engage with the SDA decision-making and appeals process, the Housing Hub and the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC) commenced a collaborative project in mid-2021, providing legal help to participants seeking reviews of NDIA decisions about SDA funding at the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT). This report presents early findings from this project, with the aims of: 1. Documenting decisions and processing times for requests for SDA funding made by participants to the NDIA, based on Housing Hub data 2. Exploring systemic problems within the NDIA’s decision-making process that PIAC hasidentified during the project, and proposing solutions Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Carrying the costs of the crisis : Australia's community sector through the Delta outbreak / Natasha Cortis and Megan Blaxland ; ACOSS

by Cortis, Natasha | Australian Council of Social Service | Blaxland, Megan | Councils of Social Service | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Bendigo Bank.

Publisher: Sydney, NSW : Australian Council of Social Service, 2022Description: 71 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Australian Community Sector Survey report.Online Access: Report | Website Summary: This report explores the experiences of 1828 community sector workers, including 513 service leaders (CEOs and senior managers), and 640 frontline workers, captured for the Australian Community Sector Survey (ACSS) during September 2021.2 Participants shared their perspectives on working in the community sector through 2021, including during the COVID-19 Delta outbreak. Questions covered service delivery, workforce, funding, and contractual arrangements. Results show the Australia’s community sector responded to the prolonged crisis with determination, resilience, innovation, and extraordinary industriousness. Participants provided multiple accounts of the ways organisations swiftly adapted service models to sustain appropriate support for people experiencing disadvantage, poverty, and hardship, and to help communities navigate health, economic and social disruption. However, the community sector also faced significant challenges in 2021, as governments adopted more passive approaches to managing the crisis, withdrawing financial supports before the crisis subsided, and shifting responsibility onto individuals, families, and communities. The Federal Government’s withdrawal of the Coronavirus Supplement in April 2021 reduced JobSeeker payment levels, despite the demonstrated benefits this essential financial support had for millions of people on low income.3 The community sector saw the substantial progress made during 2020 in addressing poverty and inequality fall away in 2021.4 In the absence of adequate government support, community sector workers, organisational leaders and individual service users were left to carry the ongoing costs of the crisis. [Executive Summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Decarbonising infrastructure / Infrastructure Partnerships Australia

by Infrastructure Partnerships Australia.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W : Infrastructure Partnerships Australia, 2022Description: 50 p : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Report (Online Resource) | Website Summary: This paper considers a range of different policy mechanisms to transition the infrastructure sector to a zero-emission future rapidly, efficiently and affordably, laying out potential actions by the public and private sectors against some of the biggest emitting forms of infrastructure. However, with the increasingly convergent and dynamic relationships between historically separate infrastructure asset classes, overcoming challenges and unlocking progress towards decarbonisation will require collaboration across the sector. -- page 3Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
It's not our difference that is the disability : impact of COVID-19 in Australia on children and young people with disability, and their families / Renshaw, L and Goodhue, R (ARACY)

by Renshaw, L | Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth | Goodhue, R.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT. : Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth (ARACY), 2021Description: 58 p. (Online Resource).Other title: Impact of COVID-19 in Australia on children and young people with disability, and their families | COVID-19 and children & young people with disability report.Online Access: Website Summary: The COVID-19 pandemic is both a global and a local disaster, a health crisis and an economic one. For most of us, that’s all we see of this pandemic. And for most of us that is unsettling enough. But for children and young people with disability, their families and caregivers, this pandemic has resulted in major challenges, disruption and negative impacts, which pose threats to their futures. Sadly, because of a lack of research we only get a glimpse of the extra challenges these children, young people and their families face. But what we can see is, again, deeply unsettling. For example, we know that from the work outlined in this report, since the pandemic lockdowns began last year, 64% of families with a child/ren with a disability reported being unable to buy essentials such as groceries and special dietary products, and nearly 40% of families with a child with a neurodevelopmental disability reported financial difficulties. Extra burdens on those Australians already facing more day-to-day challenges than the average, reinforcing the inequity children and young people with disability already face. When home-schooling became necessary, only half of surveyed families reported receiving curriculum and learning materials in accessible formats, with 26% saying that learning materials were provided by a parent or caregiver, rather than an educator or school. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Understanding the lived experience and benefits of regional cities L. Crommelin, T. Denham, L. Troy et al. (AHURI)

by Crommelin, Laura | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Denham, Todd | Troy, Laurence | et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2022Description: viii, 95 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Website link to the research report page which gives access to, Full Publication ; Executive Summary & Policy Evidence Summary | DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: May 2022Summary: This research investigates the lived experience of regional city residents (in five case studies) to understand how the benefits and disadvantages of regional city life are perceived and explore attitudes towards population growth. Over the 21st century Australia’s population has grown at a high rate and has been concentrated in the major cities, while many of the more remote areas of inland Australia have been stagnant or experienced population decline. As a result, there are two policy concerns regarding the distribution of population and growth in Australia: the need to ameliorate metropolitan population pressures by redirecting population growth out of the cities, and the uncertain futures of many parts of regional Australia that are not currently growing. The research finds that for pro-growth policies to be well-received in regional areas, it is essential that they are perceived as beneficial by local residents. The research also indicates that a primary focus for growth policy should be on improving regional labour markets, which would then attract population. This includes the need to consider how long-term career aspirations can be fulfilled in non-metropolitan Australia. More broadly, the findings indicate that policy making needs to be approached from a regional perspective, with the goal of making regional Australia an attractive place to live and work, rather than approached as a solution to metropolitan population pressures.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Pathways and outcomes for young people using Specialist Homelessness Services : a research paper in support of the Education First Youth Foyer Project / Michael Horn (RPC)

by Horn, Michael | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2015Description: 51 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The evaluation seeks to compare outcomes of assistance provided to eligible young people between the three EFYF trial sites, the standard form of transitional housing with support and the 8 Step Forward services. In order to minimise selection bias effects - acknowledging that young people will have potentially differing characteristics to match entry criteria set by the three EFYFs in each region - the evaluation sampling frame needed to take into account the demographic and background characteristics of young people using the above three categories of service, as well as attributes relating to difference in selection criteria applied by each of these service types. In the case of both EFYF and for some of the Step Forward services, this includes an assessment of the young person's readiness and commitment to full participation in the activities offered by each service. -- p.8Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Coaching in Action / Brotherhood of St Laurence

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence [2022]Description: 16 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This document aims to provide a practical guide to assist you in having coaching conversations with the young people you work with. In this document you will find tools, techniques and step-by-step guides to support your coaching practice. A coaching approach is used across a number of Brotherhood of St Laurence programs including education, housing and homelessness and state based care. For further information about coaching theory, pedagogy and practice, please refer to the BSL Youth Transitions Coaching Guide. [Intention]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Transitions to employment of Australian young people with disability and the Ticket to Work Initiative / Michelle Wakeford and Fiona Waugh (Ticket to Work)

by Wakeford, Michelle | Ticket to Work | Waugh, Fiona.

Publisher: [Fitzroy,Vic] : [Ticket to Work,] 2014Description: [88 p] + [10 p.] PDF.Online Access: Report | Summary Summary: ‘School to work’ transition refers to the critical socio-economic life changing period between approximately 15 to 24 years of age – a period when young individuals develop and build skills, based on their initial education and training that helps them become productive members of the society (World Bank, 2009). ‘School to work’ transition is challenging for almost every young person. It is in this critical education transition period that a young person’s future can be determined, and the success (or otherwise) of the transition can have implications that last a lifetime. This is particularly true for young people with disability. The impact of young people with disability making a successful transition from school to work and/or further study is critical as a positive one can greatly improve their long-term economic future, wellbeing and inclusion in society. Those who do not make a successful transition are at greater risk of labour-force and social exclusion, as well physical and mental health risks. Hence targeted and strategic policy and program intervention during transition provides benefit to the individual as well as our wider society and economy. Indeed, research has shown that transition points in life, or the ‘fork in the road’ periods, are important times in an individual’s life when timely resources and support investment in can assist in avoiding or minimising long-term disadvantage (Ziguras, 2005). During the transition from school period young people often encounter great uncertainties and tremendous developmental challenges. These issues may be made more stressful by the presence of a disability, therebyincreasing the risk of social exclusion amongst those young people who are transitioning and have a disability (Yu 2009; Blacher 2001; Dewson et al. 2004; Lichtenstein 1998; Winn and Hay 2009). Research shows that Australian young people with disability are not successfully transitioning from school into further training or employment; a factor that is an indicator of long term, and often life-long, disadvantage. In Australia, young people with disability are more likely to drop out of school early, be excluded from the labour force, have fewer educational qualifications, experience poverty and be socially isolated. Improving these outcomes is a societal imperative as well as an economic one. Societal, in that it enables all people to participate fully in society and be active citizens. Economic, because increasing the number of persons with disability in employment can contribute to mitigating some of the labour force effects imposed by an ageing population, can reduce pension dependency and improve individuals’ overall financial and wellbeing status. Ticket to Work is an initiative that was borne out of an awareness that Australian young people were not successfully transition to employment from school and the need to provide targeted support to avoid long term disadvantage. Ticket to Work is underpinned by a philosophy that ‘every young person with disability is entitled to participate in the community, source appropriate employment and be socially included’ and, that to achieve this, a localised partnership network-driven approach increases the likelihood of achieving the philosophical goal. Ticket to Work aims to improve post-school transitions of young people with disability, not only for the benefit of the individual but also for the benefit of our wider society and economy. [Summary – from report] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Educating for care : meeting skills shortages in an expanding ECEC industry / by Mark Dean ; Australia Institute. Centre for Future Work ; Carmichael Centre

by Dean, Mark | Australia Institute. Centre for Future Work | Carmichael Centre.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Australian Institute, 2022Description: 41 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: This paper argues that the provision of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) services should be treated as a strategic industry of national importance – not just a ‘market’, and not just a ‘cost’ item on government budgets. The ECEC sector supports hundreds of thousands of jobs. It directly creates billions of dollars of value-added in the Australian economy. It generates further demand for other sectors – both upstream, in its own supply chain, and downstream in consumer goods and services industries that depend on the buying power of ECEC workers. It facilitates work and production throughout the rest of Australia’s economy, by allowing parents to work – although that goal would be much better achieved if Australia had a more comprehensive, universal, and public ECEC system. Perhaps most important, ECEC enhances the long-term potential of Australia’s economy, and all of society, by providing young children with high-quality education opportunities that have significant benefits. [Summary]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Systems change theory and practice : a brief review and practical insights / Ruth Knight and Louise Baldwin ( Australian Centre for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies)

by Knight, Ruth | Queensland University of Technology. Australian Centre for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies | Baldwin, Louise.

Publisher: Brisbane, QLD : Australian Centre for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies, Queensland University of Technology, 2022Description: 44 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: For people and organisations interested in child and family wellbeing, the study of systems is increasingly relevant. Researchers and practitioners are gaining interest in systems theory as they seek to learn more about how systems operate, interconnect and function – particularly in ways that enable children, families and communities to thrive. Where children and families are not thriving, are disadvantaged or have experienced trauma, the evidence suggests that systems thinking can develop a shared understanding of how to create a more supportive and effective system of care. Systems thinking is also helping to find solutions that address the root causes of challenging conditions that prevent life-long health and wellbeing. Inherently, systems change is not easy, so this discussion paper was prompted by the need to better understand what principles and combination of actions can create systems change when a system is not operating optimally. Reviewing different theories and perspectives can help researchers and practitioners to think about how to improve outcomes for children, families and communities. This discussion paper does not set out to be prescriptive or exhaustive. Perspectives and theories about systems change are extensive, and decades of work has informed modern systems change approaches. Therefore, this paper offers a summary of recently published literature and key theories. It includes several case studies of programs and organisations to illustrate how they have applied theory. For those seeking a deeper dive into systems thinking and change, we have included links to references and other relevant resources, including guiding questions. This discussion paper is divided into three sections to answer core questions that can be informed by the literature: 1. What is systems change theory? 2. What are systems change approaches? 3. How are systems change approaches being evaluated? Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
An environmental fig leaf? : restoring integrity to the Emissions Reduction Fund / Polly Hemming, Alia Armistead, Sumithri Venketasubramanian (Australia Institute)

by Hemming, Polly | Australia Institute | Armistead, Alia | Venketasubramanian, Sumithri.

Publisher: Canberra, ACT : Australian Institute, 2022Description: 52 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: The ERF requires a comprehensive and independent review to assess its integrity and, most importantly, its role in helping Australia meet its climate targets. [Website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Uninsurable nation : Australia's most climate- vulnerable places / Nicki Hutley, Annika Dean, Nathan Hart et al. (Climate Council )

by Hutley, Nicki | Climate Council | Dean, Annika | Hart, Nathan et al.

Publisher: Potts Point : Climate Council of Australia Limited, 2022Description: iii, 29 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: 1. Climate change is creating an insurability crisis in Australia due to worsening extreme weather and sky-rocketing insurance premiums. 2. Climate change affects all Australians, but some federal electorates face far greater risks than others. 3.Riverine floods are the most costly disaster in Australia. 4. Decisions and actions over this next term of government will influence the future impacts of climate change for generations to come.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Dynamics of income poverty in Australia : evidence from the HILDA Survey, 2001 to 2019 / Esperanza Vera-Toscano and Roger Wilkins (MIAESR)

by Vera-Toscano, Esperanza | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research | Wilkins, Roger.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Melbourne Institute: Applied Economic & Social Research, University of Melbourne 2022; ©The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute: Applied Economic & Social Research, 2022Description: 91 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This report draws on 19 years of data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey, spanning the period 2001 to 2019, to investigate poverty dynamics. We describe the extent, depth and nature of persistent poverty, the main events (or ‘routes’) associated with movements into and out of poverty, and the determinants of the lengths of poverty spells and ‘non-poverty’ spells.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Better data visualizations : a guide for scholars, researchers, and wonks / Jonathan Schwabish.

by Schwabish, Jonathan A [author.].

Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, [2021]Description: xi, 449 p.Summary: "Now more than ever, content must be visual if it is to travel far. Readers everywhere are overwhelmed with a flow of data, news, and text. Visuals can cut through the noise and make it easier for readers to recognize and recall information. Yet many researchers were never taught how to present their work visually. This book details essential strategies to create more effective data visualizations. Jonathan Schwabish walks readers through the steps of creating better graphs and how to move beyond simple line, bar, and pie charts. Through more than five hundred examples, he demonstrates the do's and don'ts of data visualization, the principles of visual perception, and how to make subjective style decisions around a chart's design. Schwabish surveys more than eighty visualization types, from histograms to horizon charts, ridgeline plots to choropleth maps, and explains how each has its place in the visual toolkit. It might seem intimidating, but everyone can learn how to create compelling, effective data visualizations. This book will guide you as you define your audience and goals, choose the graph that best fits for your data, and clearly communicate your message"--Availability: No items available Checked out (1).
The big book of dashboards : visualizing your data using real-world business scenarios / Steve Wexler, Jeffrey Shaffer, Andy Cotgreave.

by Wexler, Steve, 1958- [author.] | Shaffer, Jeffrey, 1972- [author.] | Cotgreave, Andy, 1972- [author.].

Publisher: Hoboken, New Jersey : Wiley, [2017]Description: xv, 432 p. col. ill.Notes: Includes index.Summary: "The definitive reference book with real-world solutions you won't find anywhere else The Big Book of Dashboards presents a comprehensive reference for those tasked with building or overseeing the development of business dashboards. Comprising dozens of examples that address different industries and departments (healthcare, transportation, finance, human resources, marketing, customer service, sports, etc.) and different platforms (print, desktop, tablet, smartphone, and conference room display) The Big Book of Dashboards is the only book that matches great dashboards with real-world business scenarios. By organizing the book based on these scenarios and offering practical and effective visualization examples, The Big Book of Dashboards will be the trusted resource that you open when you need to build an effective business dashboard. In addition to the scenarios there's an entire section of the book that is devoted to addressing many practical and psychological factors you will encounter in your work. It's great to have theory and evidenced-based research at your disposal, but what will you do when somebody asks you to make your dashboard 'cooler' by adding packed bubbles and donut charts? The expert authors have a combined 30-plus years of hands-on experience helping people in hundreds of organizations build effective visualizations. They have fought many 'best practices' battles and having endured bring an uncommon empathy to help you, the reader of this book, survive and thrive in the data visualization world. A well-designed dashboard can point out risks, opportunities, and more; but common challenges and misconceptions can make your dashboard useless at best, and misleading at worst. The Big Book of Dashboards gives you the tools, guidance, and models you need to produce great dashboards that inform, enlighten, and engage"--; "In The Dashboard Book, the authors will lay out a variety of examples of successful dashboards so that the reader can find a scenario that closely matches what he or she is tasked with visualizing"--Availability: No items available Checked out (1).
Effective data storytelling : how to drive change with data, narrative and visuals / Brent Dykes.

by Dykes, Brent [author.].

Publisher: Hoboken, New Jersey : Wiley, [2020]Description: xiv, 322 pages : illustrations (chiefly colour), portraits (some colour).Other title: Effective data storytelling.Summary: Until now, most of the content on data storytelling has focused solely on data visualization best practices. However, data storytelling is much more than just effective data visualization. In particular, the powerful narrative aspects have been overlooked or only lightly covered in the marketplace. In addition, very little attention has been spent on the psychological aspects of why stories outperform statistics. This book will introduce much-needed frameworks to better clarify what it means to tell stories with data and offer helpful techniques to be more effective with data storytelling.; Availability: No items available Checked out (1).
No one left behind : why Australia should lock in full employment / Brendan Coates and Alex Ballantyne (GI)

by Coates, Brendan | Grattan Institute | Ballantyne, Alex.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2022Description: 46 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Website (incl chart data) Summary: This report shows why Australia should aim to lock in full employment– where everyone who wants a job can find a job. It demonstrates that all workers suffer when unemployment is high, but the most vulnerable workers suffer the most. And the costs of failing to reach full employment increase over time.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Effects of renting on household energy expenditure : evidence from Australia / Rohan Best ; Paul J. Burke (Australian National University. Crawford School of Public Policy)

by Best, Rohan | Australian National University. Crawford School of Public Policy | Burke, Paul J.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian National University. Crawford School of Public Policy 2022Description: 28 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Working Paper (Online Resource) Summary: This paper uses household survey data from Australia to investigate whether renters face larger energy bills than otherwise similar households. We find that a negative unconditional effect of renting on residential electricity expenditure becomes positive when controlling for log net wealth, with renters on average spending about 8% more than otherwise similar households. This is a larger effect than in most prior studies. The effect operates via higher usage quantities rather than higher average prices, and a similar effect is found for overall residential energy expenditure including natural gas. Central to the story is that renters tend to have lower net wealth, and net wealth is associated with higher energy use due to reasons including additional appliance ownership. This makes net wealth an important control. The findings cast light on the potential for more ambitious policy responses to reduce energy-related disadvantages faced by renters in Australia. There is also scope for further research into whether similarly large effects are evident in other countriesAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Managing access to social housing in Australia : Unpacking policy frameworks and service provision outcomes / Hal Pawson and David Lilley

by Pawson, Hal | University of New South Wales. City Futures Research Centre | Lilley, David | City Futures Research Centre.

Publisher: Strawberry Hills, N.S.W. : UNSW City Futures Research Centre 2022Description: 6 p.; 218 p. (Online Resource) ill. col. ; charts ; tables.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Working Paper under ARC research project ‘Waithood – The experience of waiting for social housing’ Summary: This report presents an overview of the policies and quantitative data associated with the management of access to social housing in Australia. That is, the rules and procedures that govern the allocation of social housing properties, and the handling of tenancy applications. It has been assembled as part of a larger research project funded through the ARC Linkage program with the support of industry partners. The study’s primary aim is to generate new insights into the situation of people seeking social housing (‘waitees’), the stress that results, and the coping strategies employed by social housing applicants in negotiating affordable shelter while awaiting a tenancy offer. In analysing the administrative framework governing access to social housing from a more managerial perspective, this working paper draws on national statistics published by the AIHW and the Productivity Commission’s Report on Government Services (ROGS). It also analyses figures published by the three states that are the particular focus of the study: NSW, Queensland, and Tasmania. While the working paper is primarily intended to inform other components of the research, it may also be of interest to social housing researchers, advocates, and other stakeholders. Social housing waiting list numbers are frequently cited in media and policy debate as a measure of expressed housing need. However, while benefiting from conceptual simplicity, these statistics are highly imperfect for this purpose. This is particularly apparent from the observed long-run divergence between trends in national ‘point in time’ waiting list totals and changing levels of housing need as evidenced by other metrics. [Executive summary-Extract]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Alternative housing models for precariously housed older Australians / Selina Tually,Veronica Coram, Debbie Faulkne et al. (AHURI)

by Tually, Selina | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Coram, Veronica | Faulkner, Debbie | et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2022Description: vi, 75 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Website Website link to the research report page which gives access to, Full Publication ; Executive Summary & Policy Evidence Summary Summary: This research investigates the potential of alternative housing models to increase the supply of affordable housing for older Australians and the role alternative financing schemes could play in expanding those options. A survey of industry stakeholders shows almost 75 per cent reported that the housing needs of lower income older people (55+) in the jurisdiction where they were based are ‘not well’ or ‘not at all well’ met. Participants said relying too heavily on the private rental sector to house older lower income people was problematic, and one of the main reasons why alternative affordable housing options are urgently needed. The research identified seven housing models that best represented different combinations of attributes suitable for older households and that could benefit from further research: using mixed use apartment building owned by a state housing authority (rental); cooperative housing on land owned by a community housing provider (rental); communal housing in a two-storey building owned by a community housing provider (rental); transportable home on vacant public land (rental); shared equity home in the outer suburbs of a capital city (ownership); dual key property in the outer suburbs of a capital city (ownership); and village-style housing (rental). Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Strengthening the role of vocational training for young people / Kira Clarke, David Longley and Madeleine Morey (SPARC)

by Clarke, Kira | Brotherhood of St Laurence Social Policy and Research Centre | Longley, David | Morey, Madeleine.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: [70 p.] PDF.Other title: Strengthening the role of vocational training for young people : symposium | Presentation to symposium at AVETRA 2022 conference.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Symposium overview: This year’s conference addresses the theme of “Building a research community to shape VET's future”. VET policy levers used over last two decades have been shown not to work – new ways of reforming the system require new ways of evidence making Understanding the ways in which the people, training products, pathways, practices and policies of our VET system interact and behave requires a diverse set of inquiry modes and adaptive evidence making approaches; In this symposium we will: Outline how we are using a systemic change methodology to enable place based systemic change that maximises the utility of Australia’s training system for enabling young people to access decent work Illustrate two case examples of how this methodology is being used to: Unlock the potential of apprenticeships through new approaches to employment based training Strengthen the role of the training system in enable secure job outcomes for young people through a new model of employability ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Woort Koorliny : Australian Indigenous Employment Index 2022 National Report / Rebecca Cassells, Alan Duncan, Michael Dockery et al (Minderoo Foundation) (Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC) (Murawin)

by Cassells, Rebecca | Minderoo Foundation | Duncan, Alan | Dockery, Michael et al | Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre | Murawin.

Publisher: Perth, W.A. : Minderoo Foundation, 2022Description: 168 p. : ill (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: The Indigenous Employment Index was commissioned by Minderoo’s Generation One initiative, partnering with Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre and Murawin Consulting, as an Australian first to identify and measure practices within large organisations that increase and improve Indigenous employment. The goal of the Indigenous Employment Index is to provide an evidence base for “what works” in creating Indigenous employment parity in a sustainable and meaningful way. In creating the evidence base, the index sought to quantify the numbers of Indigenous people employed by major employers and collect information about the programs and policies these employers have put in place. The research finds there is genuine commitment from participating organisations to Indigenous employment, and that progress is being made. However there is still much work to be done to improve the attraction, retention, and progression of Indigenous employees, while creating culturally safe and inclusive environments where all employees can thrive. [Website} Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Housing affordability in Australia: tackling a wicked problem / V&F Housing Enterprise Foundation ; Per Capita

by V&F Housing Enterprise Foundation | Per Capita.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : [Per Capita Australia], 2022Description: 104 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Report (Online Resource) Summary: The research and analysis that follows: Provides a short history of the historical patterns, policy choices and regulatory changes that have led to the current situation. Examines home ownership, rental and social housing trends over time, using a broad range of indicators and evidence. Explores the contemporary debate as to why house prices are growing so much faster than incomes. Uses international comparisons to highlight where we sit in relation to other countries. Sets out the core and secondary drivers of housing unaffordability, on both the supply and demand side of the equation, from the capital gains tax discount to zoning and planning laws. Provides a pathway for advocacy in resolving some of these socially and economically harmful trends and practices. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Changing community attitudes to improve inclusion of people with disability / Jan Idle, Gianfranco Giuntoli, Karen Fisher et al. (Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability)

by Idle, Jan | Australia. Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability | Giuntoli, Gianfranco | Fisher, Karen et al | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Flinders University.

Publisher: [Sydney] : [UNSW Social Policy Research Centre.] 2022Description: i, 147 p. PDF.Other title: Research report : changing community attitudes to improve inclusion of people with disability.Online Access: Research report | Research report (easy read version) | Website Summary: The evidence review and interviews consistently found that to make changes to attitudes, behaviours and outcomes, the key was interventions based on information and education. Interventions were targeted towards organisations, communities and individuals. Structural interventions led by government seemed to be important for success. Interventions used a combination of regulation, guidelines, persuasion and modelling. The interventions emphasised: Active presence of a diversity of people with disability across all life domains, including inclusive schooling, employment and communities Leadership by people with disability at the centre, and leadership by organisations and government that highlights the diverse contribution of people with disability Targeting multiple levels and multiple types of policy and intervention in a holistic approach to system change Long-term approaches with adequate resourcing to achieve structural, sustained changes Measuring, monitoring and research that inform decisions about interventions and accountability across organisations Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Renewable energy development and the Native Title Act 1993 (Cwlth) : the fairness of validating future acts associated with renewable energy projects / Ganur Maynard ; Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research

by Maynard, Ganur | Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.

Canberra, ACT : Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (ANU), 2022Description: v, 31 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: Increasing demand, innovations in technology, and extensions to electricity grid infrastructure are likely to lead to a growth in renewable energy development on native title land and water. The likelihood that native title holders and claimants will benefit from this development will depend in part upon the legal regime that governs native title. The prevailing legal regime governing renewable energy development on native title land and water involves two principal alternatives to permitting development: voluntary land use agreements and compulsory government acquisition of native title. While the procedures associated with these alternatives afford native title holders and claimants more procedural protection than some commentators have suggested, they fail to attain the standard of ‘free, prior, and informed consent’ prescribed by international best practice and the philosophical and moral arguments that underpin that standard. To remedy this failure, the Native Title Act 1993 (Cwlth) should be amended to place less weight on economic and similar considerations when authorising the compulsory acquisition of native title for renewable energy development, or prohibit the compulsory acquisition of native title generally, except for in certain exceptional circumstances. While this paper focuses on renewable energy in particular, a number of its conclusions could apply to issues that attenuate native title generally. . [Abstract] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Wicked problems in public policy : understanding and responding to complex challenges / Brian Head.

by Head, Brian [author.].

Publisher: Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2022Publisher: © The Author(s) 2022Description: vii, 176 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The democratic context of policymaking is central to this book. It is about policy debates and stakeholders in democracies. And while all countries share some important common challenges in problem-solving and effective governance, this book has little to say directly about policymaking in authoritarian political systems and militarised autocracies. in democracies, most of the ‘big’ issues of modern life—social, economic, environmental, technological—are likely to be controversial. The big issues are indeed very real—they shape our lived worlds. Many of these issues seem messy and intractable. And in most cases, there are no ‘correct’ and comprehensive answers. Everyone has an opinion about ome aspects of the problem, and about what needs to be done. (Introduction)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Supporting all children to thrive : the importance of equity in early childhood education / The Front Project

by Front Project.

Publisher: [Australia] : The Front Project, 2022Description: 40 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Report (Online Resource) | Website Summary: We all want every child to have a healthy and fulfilling life, regardless of their background or where they live. Most of a child’s brain development occurs between the ages of one and three years, and research shows that their early experiences set a strong foundation for learning, health and wellbeing throughout their lives. We also know that, to thrive, children need a range of things, including relationships with supportive adults, places to play, clean air, good nutrition, and affordable, high-quality early childhood education and care (ECEC). Children can face a range of risk factors, such as lack of healthy food, family stress and unstable accommodation, but protective factors, such as safe, loving parents and caregivers, and high-quality ECEC, help to protect children and reduce the harm caused by such risks. Australia has been measuring child development – including developmental vulnerability and the domains that make up child development – for more than a decade, through the Australian Early Development Census (AEDC). The AEDC classifies children as ‘on track’, ‘at risk’ or ‘vulnerable’ depending on how they score in each area of development, known as a domain. Children who are developmentally vulnerable demonstrate a much lower than average ability in at least one AEDC domain. The five domains measured are physical health and wellbeing, social competence, emotional maturity, language and cognitive skills (school-based), and communication skills and general knowledge. These are essential aspects of children’s development that have long-term consequences in areas such as adult health, employment, and social outcomes (AEDC 2014). Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Working together : the case for universal employment support / Andrew Phillips a (DEMOS)

by Phillips, Andrew | DEMOS.

Publisher: London, U.K. : DEMOS, 2022Description: 53 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The report examines employment support services, which help people find work. It recommends introducing a new system, the Universal Work Service, which will offer integrated employment support, skills and careers advice services. Delivered and commissioned at a local level, this service will offer universal support to anyone who wants to find, stay in or progress in work. It will replace the fragmented set of services which currently exist, including Jobcentre Plus, separate employment support programmes, adult skills funding, and the National Careers Service. The Universal Work Service is a fundamentally different model compared to the employment support, skills and careers system that currently exists in the UK, designed to help the UK address the economic challenges of falling labour market participation, an underskilled workforce, an ageing population, rapid technological change, and the need to transition to a low-carbon economy. The Universal Work Service will improve employment outcomes by strengthening two key relationships: the relationship between a citizen and their one-to one coach, and the relationships, or social capital, between citizens themselves. It will build on and utilise the existing high-quality services provided by professionals and organisations working in the employment support, skills and careers sectors. By integrating services so that they work together in local areas, it will deliver better outcomes for individuals, employers and the wider economy. The Universal Work Service will help the government to achieve its Levelling Up missions, support local economic growth, and improve people’s lives, social capital and wellbeing Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The Wages Crisis in Australia : what it is and what to do about it / Edited by Andrew Stewart, Jim Stanford and Tess Hardy

by Stewart, Andrew [editor.] | Stanford, Jim [editor.] | Hardy, Tess [editor.].

Publisher: Adelaide : University of Adelaide Press, 2018Description: 346 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This edited volume of chapters resulted from an international conference held at the University of Adelaide in July 2016 under the same title to explore the multifaceted concept of ʿilm in Islam - its agency and manifestations in the connected realms of science, religion, and the arts. The aim is to explore the Islamic civilisational responses to major shifts in the concept of 'knowledge' that took place in the post-mediaeval period, and especially within the context of the 'early modern'. It asserts that the true value of knowledge lies in its cross-civilisational reach, as when the development of knowledge in pre-modern Islam exerted profound changes onto the Europeans, whose resurgence in the early modern period has in turn forced massive changes onto the Islamic worldview and its systems of knowledge. Now the landscape of knowledge has significantly changed, the Muslim mind, which has been historically calibrated to be particularly sensitive towards knowledge, can and should open to new horizons of knowing where science, religion, and art can meet again on freshly cultivated and intellectually fertile grounds.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The Wages Crisis : revisited / Andrew Stewart, Jim Stanford and Tess Hardy (Australia Institute. Centre for Future Work)

by Stewart, Andrew | Australia Institute. Centre for Future Work | Stanford, Jim | Hardy, Tess.

Publisher: Canberra : Australia Institute, 2022Description: 79 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Report (Online Resource) | Website Summary: This report updates and supplements analysis originally contained in the book, The Wages Crisis in Australia: What it is and what to do about it, edited by Andrew Stewart, Jim Stanford, and Tess Hardy, originally published by University of Adelaide Press in November 2018. That original book contained 20 contributions from a wide range of Australian labour policy scholars and practitioners, documenting the extent, con sequence, causes, and potential policy responses to the unprecedented stagnation of average wages in Australia visible since 2013. This report updates both the data and policy implications in light of continued weakness in Australian wages since then. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Australian economic history : transformations of an interdisciplinary field / Claire E. F. Wright

by Wright, Claire E. F.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. : ANU Press, 2022; This edition © 2022 ANU PressDescription: xvii, 214 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: In a time of pandemics, war and climate change, fostering knowledge that transcends disciplinary boundaries is more important than ever. Economic history is one of the world’s oldest interdisciplinary fields, with its prosperity dependent on connection and relevance to disciplinary behemoths economics and history. Australian Economic History is the first history of an interdisciplinary field in Australia, and the first to set the field’s progress within the structures of Australian universities. It highlights the lived experience of doing interdisciplinary research, and how scholars have navigated the opportunities and challenges of this form of knowledge. These lessons are vital for those seeking to develop robust interdisciplinary conversations now and in the future.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
News ways for our families : designing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural practice framework and system responses to address the impacts of domestic and family violence on children and young people / Garth Morgan ; Candice Butler ; Reno French (ANROWS)

by Morgan, Gareth | Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety | Butler, Cameron | French, Reno et al.

Publisher: Sydney, New South Wales : Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety, 2022Description: iv, 46 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Research Report | Website Summary: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people are overrepresented in child protection systems in Australia, including in Queensland. These same children and young people also experience high rates of domestic and family violence (DFV), which is often a leading cause for their family’s engagement with child protection services. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Public hearing 13 : preventing and responding to violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation in disability services (a case study) / Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability

by Australia. Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability.

Publisher: Brisbane : Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect & Exploitation of People with Disability. 2022Description: vi, 119 p. PDF.Other title: Preventing and responding to violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation in disability services (a case study) | Public hearing 13 : what can we do about violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation in disability services?.Online Access: Report | Report (easy read version) Summary: Public hearing 13 examined the experiences of a group of people with disability living in disability residential accommodation in western Sydney provided by a non-government disability services provider, Sunnyfield Disability Services (Sunnyfield). We refer to the accommodation as ‘the House’. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Support in Specialist Disability Accommodation (SDA) Apartments : findings from co-design workshops and interviews with tenants and providers / Di Winkler ; Carolyn Finis ; Kate D'Cruz et al (Summer Foundation)

by Winkler, Di | Summer Foundation | Finis, Carolyn | D'Cruz, Kate et al.

Publisher: Melbourne Vic. Summer Foundation, 2022Description: 120 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The National Disability Insurance Agency’s (NDIA) vision is for an “ordinary life at home” for people with disability, including greater flexibility and independence. The NDIA promotes innovation in the provision of housing and supports and is seeking to “encourage new models of home and living” that replace more institutional arrangements, such as group homes or younger people living in residential aged care. One innovative model is the provision of on-site shared support (OSS) for people with disability living in co-located Specialist Disability Accommodation (SDA).Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Zero Project: Housing First Coordination For WA [Website] / Centre for Social Impact UWA

by University of Western Australia. Centre for Social Impact.

Publisher: Centre for Social Impact, 2017 -Other title: 50 Lives 50 Homes project.Online Access: Website | 50 Lives 50 Homes : first evaluation report June 2017 (Online Resource) | 50 Lives 50 Homes : second evaluation report September 2018 (Online Resource) | 50 Lives 50 Homes : third evaluation report April 2020 (Online Resource) | An evaluation snapshot Aboriginal experiences of housing first (Online Resource) | An evaluation snapshot Youth experiences of housing first (Online Resource) | The value of after-hours support as part of a housing first response to ending homelessness | Final Evaluation : 50 Lives 50 Homes Report 2022 (Online Resource) Notes: The Centre for Social Impact UWA is a key research partner on the Zero Project (previously known as the 50 Lives 50 Homes project). Led by Ruah Community Services, the project adopts a ‘Housing First’ model - an internationally evidenced model that uses a recovery-oriented approach to end homelessness in WA, including rapid access to housing and wrap-around support. The collective impact approach of Zero Project towards ending homelessness builds on the success of the innovative 50 Lives 50 Homes project, working with communities across the Perth metropolitan area, Geraldton, Mandurah, Bunbury and Rockingham. The Zero Project employs an Advance to Zero methodology that counts down the number of people needing housing, as opposed to counting the number of people housed. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The funding of Western Australian homelessness services / Paul Flatau, Leanne Lester, Zoe Callis et al. (Centre for Social Impact)

by Flatau, Paul | University of Western Australia. Centre for Social Impact | Lester, Laurence | Callis, Zoe et al.

Publisher: Perth, WA : University of Western Australia. Centre for Social Impact, 2022Description: xvi, 98 p. : ill.Online Access: Website Summary: The Funding of Western Australian Homelessness Services 2022 report provides comprehensive evidence of the funding of specialist homelessness services, mainstream services and Aboriginal services which assist those experiencing homelessness and those at risk of homelessness in Western Australia. This report presents: (1) an overview of the state of homelessness and the policy environment that Western Australian homelessness services operate within; and, (2) a comprehensive overview of the funding of homelessness services in Western Australia based on the extant literature, findings from a survey of 73 representative homelessness services operating across Western Australia and outcomes from focus groups comprising service managers. Western Australian homelessness services have provided much-needed evidence of the type, mix, and level of funding for services that support those experiencing homelessness and those at risk of homelessness, as well as the barriers in attracting funding, the extent to which services are able tomeet needs, and commissioning/contractual issues.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Sustainable human development across the life course : evidence from longitudinal research / edited by Prerna Banati.

by Banati, Prerna [editor.].

Edition: 1st.Publisher: Bristol : Bristol University Press, 2021Description: xxxiv, 225 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This important book presents impactful findings from international longitudinal studies that responded to the Agenda 2030 commitment to "leave no-one behind".It provides actionable strategies for policy makers and practitioners to strengthen the global Sustainable Development Goals framework and accelerate their implementation.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The triple bind of single-parent families : resources, employment and policies to improve wellbeing / edited by Rense Nieuwenhuis and Laurie C. Maldonado.

by Nieuwenhuis, Rense [editor.] | Maldonado, Laurie C [editor.].

Publisher: Bristol, UK : Policy Press, 2018Copyright date: �2018Description: xxiii, 478 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This edited collection examines the risks and issues faced by single parent-families and their children such as poverty, wealth/asset accumulation, health, well-being and combinative development, bringing together scholars from diverse social science backgrounds, including sociology, economics, political science, and social work. This book is the first collection of studies to examine previously neglected social policies related to single-parent families and provides innovative outcomes that will improve the lives and well-being of single parents and their children.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Effective data visualization : the right chart for the right data / Stephanie D. H. Evergreen.

by Evergreen, Stephanie D. H [author.].

Edition: Second edition.Publisher: Thousand Oaks, California : SAGE Publications, Inc., [2020]Description: xix, 328 p.Notes: "Written by sought-after speaker, designer, and researcher Stephanie D.H. Evergreen, Effective Data Visualization shows readers how to create Excel charts and graphs that best communicate data findings. This comprehensive how-to guide functions as a set of blueprints--supported by research and the author's extensive experience with clients in industries all over the world--for conveying data in an impactful way. Delivered in Evergreen's humorous and approachable style, the book covers the spectrum of graph types available beyond the default options, how to determine which one most appropriately fits specific data stories, and easy steps for making the chosen graph in Excel. New to the Second Edition is a completely re-written chapter on qualitative data; inclusion of 9 new quantitative graph types; new shortcuts in Excel; and entirely new chapter on Sharing Your Data with the World which includes advice on using dashboards; and lots of new examples throughout. The Second Edition is also presented in full color"-- Provided by publisher.Summary: "Written by sought-after speaker, designer, and researcher Stephanie D.H. Evergreen, Effective Data Visualization shows readers how to create Excel charts and graphs that best communicate data findings. This comprehensive how-to guide functions as a set of blueprints--supported by research and the author's extensive experience with clients in industries all over the world--for conveying data in an impactful way. Delivered in Evergreen's humorous and approachable style, the book covers the spectrum of graph types available beyond the default options, how to determine which one most appropriately fits specific data stories, and easy steps for making the chosen graph in Excel. New to the Second Edition is a completely re-written chapter on qualitative data; inclusion of 9 new quantitative graph types; new shortcuts in Excel; and entirely new chapter on Sharing Your Data with the World which includes advice on using dashboards; and lots of new examples throughout. The Second Edition is also presented in full color"--Availability: No items available Checked out (1).