Brotherhood of St Laurence

New Book List 2022

This list contains 230 titles

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Making time for great teaching : how better government policy can help / Jordana Hunter, Julie Sonnemann, Rebecca Joiner (GI)

by Hunter, Jordana | Grattan Institute | Sonnemann, Julie | Joiner, Rebecca.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic : Grattan Institute, 2022Description: 50 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Website Summary: Teacher workloads have blown out in recent decades, and many teachers are now too stretched to do everything we ask of them. A Grattan Institute survey of 5,442 Australian teachers and school leaders, conducted for this report, found more than 90 per cent of teachers say they don’t have enough time to prepare effectively for classroom teaching – the core of their job. Teachers report feeling overwhelmed by everything they are expected to achieve. And worryingly, many school leaders feel powerless to help them. The survey results amount to a cry for help from the teachers of Australia. If governments don’t hear this cry and act on it, they will be letting down our children. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
National elder abuse prevalence study : final report / Lixia Qu, Rae Kaspiew, Rachel Carson et al. (Australian Institute of Family Studies)

by Qu, Lixia | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Kaspiew, Rae | Carson Rachel et al.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Australian Institute of Family Studies, 2021; © Commonwealth of Australia 2021Description: xiv, 324 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Report | Summary Report | Website Summary: Elder abuse has gained significant attention in Australia in recent years as a serious problem requiring increased policy focus. Five abuse subtypes are commonly recognised: financial abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, psychological abuse (otherwise known as emotional abuse), and neglect. The increasingly older age profile of the Australian population makes it particularly important to address elder abuse effectively. The 65 and over age group is expected to more than double from 3.8 million to 8.8 million in the next 25 years. In Australia, research on elder abuse has been limited to studies looking at particular types of elder abuse (e.g. financial abuse), qualitative studies and those based on administrative data from services who provide support to older people. Such studies are unable to shed light on the proportion of older people aged 65 and over who experience elder abuse or which subtypes are most common. Nor are they able to assess other important issues, such as the extent to which elder abuse is under-reported. As part of the National Plan to Respond to the Abuse of Older Australians, the Attorney-General’s Department commissioned the most extensive empirical examination of elder abuse in Australia to date, the National Elder Abuse Prevalence Study. This report presents the findings of that research program. -- p. 1 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Impacts of new and emerging assistive technologies for ageing and disabled housing / Catherine Bridge ; Fredrick Zmudzki ; Tracy Huang et al. (AHURI)

by Bridge, Catherine | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Zmudzki, Fredrick | Huang, Tracy et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2021Description: vii, 118 p. : ill.Online Access: Website Summary: This research looks at how smart home assistive technologies (AT) may be best used in both the aged care and disability sectors to reduce the need for support services. It includes an assessment of ease of use, quality-of-life and cost benefit analysis, and contributes to the development of policy options that could facilitate effective adoption of smart home AT in Australia.[AHURI website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Inquiry into population, migration and agglomeration / Chris Leishman ; Nicole Gurran ; Amity James et al. (AHURI)

by Leishman, Chris | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Gurran, Nicole | James, Amity et al.

Publisher: Melbourne : Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute, 2021Description: vi, 51 p. : ill.Online Access: Website Summary: This Inquiry final research report investigates agglomeration economies and their ability to alter the economic productivity of cities, together with what are the key drivers of population growth and mobility in Australia.[AHURI website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Social Housing Regulation Review : interim report / Social Housing Regulation Review Panel (Vic)

by Social Housing Regulation Review Panel (Vic).

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Victorian Government, 2021Description: 136 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Interim Report (Online Resource) | Website Summary: The Victorian Government has commissioned an independent Social Housing Regulation Review. The Review aims to identify future regulatory arrangements that will best support the long-term interests of social housing residents and their communities. It also aims to best position social (and affordable) housing for growth and transformation over the coming decades. The independent Review Panel will be consulting widely throughout 2021. It will provide its preliminary recommendations to the Government based on the results of this consultation later in the year. The Panel will then seek stakeholder feedback on these recommendations before providing a final report to the Government in mid 2022. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Big data for Australian social policy : developments, benefits and risks / Edited by Janet Chan, Peter Saunders ; Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

by Chan, Janet (ed.) | Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia | Saunders, Peter (ed.).

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, 2021Description: 143 p. (Online Resource).Online Access: Ebook (Online Resource) Summary: As this book reveals, it is easy to become over-enthusiastic about the potential benefits of “big data.” And the risks involved need to be carefully identified and managed. Through a series of social policy case studies, including interviews with experts involved, as well as examination of associated documentation, the authors reveal whether the potential benefits were realised, where unintended adverse impacts occurred, and lessons for good practice risk management. The editors, in the book’s opening and closing chapters, draw together the issues raised and present the consensus view of how “big data” initiatives for social policy should be conducted, particularly in the Australian context. In summary, the editors suggest that critical to successful use of big data for social policy are: The governance arrangements that promote trust, including transparency and security; Adequate infrastructure, including the skills and capacity needed to understand the quality of the data and to use it appropriately, appreciating the extent of uncertainty of any conclusions drawn; Human rights, recognising the sovereignty of those about whom the data is concerned (with particular reference to Indigenous people and communities); Consent and a “social licence” to use the data for the purposes involved; and, related to all these, Accountability. This book goes into much detail about these and related issues and suggestions. It provides essential reading for government officials, academic researchers and community leaders Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Local Area Coordination : from service users to citizen / by Ralph Broad

by Broad, Ralph | Centre for Welfare Reform.

Publisher: [Sheffield, United Kingdom] : Centre for Welfare Reform, 2012Description: [66 p.].Other title: Local Area Coordination .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Local Area Coordination (LAC) is a powerful innovation in the way in which communities ensure everyone has enough support to be a full citizen. It reverses the current pattern, in which the current welfare system starts by providing services and then often ends up by cutting people out of their own communities.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Principles of effective policy reform : lessons for Australia's climate change policy impasse/ Edited by Nicholas Brown and Stephen Dovers ; Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia

by Brown, Nicholas (ed.) | Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia | Dovers, Stephen (ed.).

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia, 2021Description: v, 74 p, PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This discussion paper offers 10 case studies of Australian policy initiatives over recent decades. The areas covered were selected on the basis of exhibiting several of the following features: • having a considerable degree of difficulty and complexity, such that they related to several areas of interest and contest; • attending to a long-term issue, and requiring maintenance of policy attention and longevity across multiple terms of government; • having some combination of social, economic and environmental dimensions (that is, a diversity of values and imperatives); • likely requiring the use and coordination of multiple policy instruments; • requiring substantial structural adjustment, transitional support measures, or other compensatory measures; and • requiring multiple points of policy integration, in analysis, design and implementation. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Home and living options for people with disabilities : a systematic review and environmental scan of strategies to support transition from group homes and congregate care, and those which prevent movement to congregate settings / Mary-Ann O'Donovan, Eleni Demetriou, Erin Whittle et al. (Centre for Disability Studies) (University of Sydney)

by O’Donovan, Mary-Ann | Centre for Disability Studies | Demetriou, Eleni | Whittle, Erin et al | University of Sydney.

Publisher: Sydney, N.SW. : Centre for Disability Studies ; The University of Sydney, 2021Description: 226 p. (Online Resource) : ill.Online Access: Review (Online Resource) Summary: The aim of this review was to understand the interventions and strategies that are being used to help people transition out of institutional care into more individualised home and living options. Oliver et al (2020) define individualised housing as “housing options that are life stage appropriate, where people with disability have choice regarding where and with whom they live, the support they receive and their day to day activities”. This is a useful definition to guide reference to individualised housing in this report but the reader should note that often papers did not clearly define what was meant by individualised or community in the specific context. The review also aimed to document the evidence for the strategies found to support this transition. A systematic review and environmental scan of evidence from 2000-2020 across 10 academic databases, 55 organisation websites and 49 grey literature documents was run in October 2020. The academic literature predominantly reported on the process of de-institutionalisation to community group living (n=48 of 105). Twenty papers from this literature specifically addressed individualised or independent supported living models. The grey literature provided evidence of individualised or independent supported living (n=16), and movement from congregated settings (n=22). The environmental scan described accommodation interventions and supports implemented in the disability sector, with 26 organisations providing specialist accommodation and 21 offering consulting and information services to support people with disabilities in the housing process. The comprehensive search that was conducted included five types of accommodation that people with disabilities transitioned into, which facilitated greater independence as alternatives to institutional or group home models. In this review, this included: 1. Community or supported; 2. Independent or semi-independent homes, including living alone, co-residency, relationships; 3. Home ownership (shared equity); 4. Home pooling; 5. Housing modifications/redesign/technology including assistive technology and wider living ecology adaptations. Though housing modifications are not a transition to other housing per se, support to redesign and adapt a home is an intervention which is typically employed to prevent transition to congregate setting and was therefore included as part of this review. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
National Aboriginal And Torres Strait Islander Early Childhood Strategy / National Indigenous Australians Agency

by National Indigenous Australians Agency.

Publisher: Canberra ACT : National Indigenous Australians Agency 2021Description: 52 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Website Summary: The purpose of the Strategy is to pave the way for governments, non-government sectors and communities to collectively support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children to grow up healthy, engaged with education, connected to family and community, and strong in culture. The Strategy has been developed in partnership with SNAICC – National Voice for our Children, and the National Indigenous Australians Agency, with the guidance of an Advisory Group (see Appendix A). This Strategy reflects the views of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, families and communities who participated in a national consultation process, and shared their experiences, aspirations and priorities for the future wellbeing of their children. This Strategy is the foundation for working in partnership with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples to create positive change and lasting benefits for children and families. -- P.6 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
UK poverty 2022 : the essential guide to understanding poverty in the UK / JRF

by Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Publisher: York, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2022Description: 115 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: What is the picture of poverty at the start of 2022, coming up to two years after a global pandemic struck? To an extent the picture is unclear: we don’t yet have official poverty data covering the pandemic period, and we know that the quality of the very surveys we rely on for this information were affected by the onset of the pandemic. But many sources make it clear that while some groups have been well supported and face better prospects as we enter 2022, others face deep and persistent poverty. In a way this is much better than might be expected given the economic and social shock the country has been through. We know poverty at any stage in life can lead to negative impacts and so it is critical to scrutinise the data thoroughly to work out who is worst affected, determine how trends are changing over time and see what future prospects are. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The social and economic rationale of inclusive education : an overview of the outcomes in education for diverse groups of students / Cecilia Mezzanotte (OECD)

by Mezzanotte, Cecilia | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France : OECD Publishing, 2022Description: 93 p. (Online resource).Online Access: Website Summary: Since UNESCO’s Salamanca Declaration in 1994, inclusive education has progressively attracted attention in international debates around education policy. While some evidence exists on the positive impact that inclusive education reforms can have on the academic and personal outcomes of diverse students – and in particular of students with special education needs – limited information is available on the economic sustainability of such reforms. Starting from the literature on the correlations between education and individuals’ life outcomes, this paper reviews the existing evidence on the potential benefits and costs of inclusive education reforms. Specifically, the paper discusses the evidence on the shortcomings of current education settings for diverse groups of students – with specific sections on students with special education needs; immigrant and refugee students; ethnic groups, national minorities and Indigenous peoples; gifted students; female and male students; and LGBTQI+ (which stands for ‘lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex’) students. It highlights the individual and societal costs deriving from the low academic, social and emotional outcomes of these students and the socioeconomic costs these yield for societies. Where possible, the paper also presents evidence on the effects of inclusive education reforms on diverse student groups.[Abstract]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Upskilling and reskilling : the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on employers and their training choices / Ian White and Toni Rittie (NCVER)

by White, Ian | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Rittie, Toni.

Publisher: Adelaide, SA : National Centre for Vocational Education Research, 2022; © Commonwealth of Australia, 2022Description: 55 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Using data from the Survey of Employer Use and Views of the VET System and other complementary sources, this report examines how employers have fared due to the COVID-19 pandemic and what this has meant for their current and future training requirements. [website]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Report on government services / Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision

by Australia. Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision | Australia. Steering Committee for the Review of Commonwealth/State Service Provision.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T : Productivity Commission 1995 -Online Access: Report on Government Services Enumeration/Chronology: 1st (1995) - Notes: This report was produced under the direction of the Steering Committee for the Review of Government Service Provision (SCRGSP).; Editions: 1995 ; 1996 ; 1997 ; 1998 ; 1999 ; 2000 ; 2001 ; 2002 ; 2003 ; 2004 ; 2005 ; 2006 ; 2007 ; 2008 ; 2009 ; 2010 ; 2011 ; 2012 ; 2013 ; 2014 ; 2015 ; 2016 ; 2017 ; 2018 ; 2019 ; 2020 ; 2021 ; 2022; Earlier editions accessible by changing the year in the white box and pressing ‘Change year'. - Productivity Commission websiteSummary: The Report on Government Services provides a public report card on the performance of Australian governments in the delivery of important services to the community. The Report looks at a broad range of indicators relating to the cost, quality and timeliness of services covering: Education ; Justice Community services ; Health ; Emergency management ; Housing and homelessness Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission regarding 'minimum energy efficiency standards for rental homes in the ACT' consultation paper / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Sullivan, Damian.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence Description: 4 p. PDF.Other title: Submission re Minimum energy efficiency standards for rental homes in the ACT | [Submission to] Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate ACT Government.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The BSL strongly supports minimum energy efficiency standards for rented homes, which we see as a vital policy that will lower cost of living and improve health and comfort for renters, particularly the people facing disadvantage who we work with. Standards are particularly effective at improving the quality of the poorest quality homes, which are often rented by people on low incomes. People in these poor quality homes are too often in an unenviable position – high rent and low income give them limited choice in the market, if they end up in a poor quality home (as they often do) they face higher electricity bills or poor health and wellbeing outcomes. Minimum standards can go some way to addressing this issue. Standards will also contribute to Australia’s climate change response and improve air pollution. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission re the New Disability Employment Service Model / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley | Thies, Andrew.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2022Description: 14 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) is pleased to contribute to the consultation into the development of the new Disability Employment Services (DES) model. We have outlined in this submission key recommendations for the development of DES that promote best practice disability employment policy. These practices are informed by: the experience of BSL’s NDIS participants in the Pathways to Employment (P2E) project ; the experience of BSL’s Local Area Coordination (LAC) staff who have interacted with the DES program, either through referring NDIS participants or having previously worked with DES providers ; BSL’s expertise in employment-related research, program delivery and systems change work of the National Youth Employment Body (NYEB) (BSL 2022b) conducted with jobseekers, employers and services providers ; academic literature. System level recommendations 1. Adopt a clear, person-centred vision for DES focused on access to and attainment of decent work 2. Improve connections and alignment between systems through governance mechanisms 3. Invest in more demand-side policy interventions 4. Commission to encourage collaboration, not competition Policy level recommendations 5. Expand access and eligibility for DES to all people with disability 6. Co-design adaptive employment policy with employers 7. Redefine mutual obligations as mutual accountabilities Program level recommendations 8. Develop program models that provide more training and upskilling opportunities 9. Define and measure success in conjunction with participants 10. Embed feedback mechanisms into DES for real choice and control for participants – p.3 Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Environmental scan part 1 : current research and evaluation to promote economic participation of people with disability / Diane Brown and Shelley Mallett (BSL)

by Brown, Diane | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 102 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Environmental Scan Part 1 (Research Report) | Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability Project [Website] Notes: Environmental Scan part 1 and Environment Scan Part 2 are linked to the Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability project. To learn more about the project click the website link. Summary: This report details findings from Part 1 of a two-part Environmental Scan of current practice of employment interventions and research for people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability. The Environmental Scan includes: 1. A desktop scan of current and recent Australian research; and current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally (2015-2021 inclusive) 2. Interviews and focus groups with experts in the disability employment policy and program field (presented in a second report, Environmental Scan Part 2: Views of experts in the field on effective employment interventions for people with a disability). This Environmental Scan is one component of a broader project commissioned by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) designed to examine the scope and evidence for different interventions that improve the economic participation and employment of people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disabilities. The project will help provide the NDIA with the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of different employment interventions. Alongside the Environmental Scan, the full project also includes a Systematic Review, including a review of the theoretical evidence (see Systematic Review Technical Report, and Summary Report). Scope of the Environmental Scan Part 1 Part 1 of the Environmental Scan set out to map the current landscape of research and interventions aimed at promoting economic participation of people with a disability (with a focus on the three target populations) and identify promising areas of practice or innovation. This report addresses two of the three questions proposed by the NDIA for the Environmental Scan: 1. What research aimed at improving employment participation of people with either autism, intellectual disability or psychosocial disability is currently underway? 2. What are the applicable current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally? Part 1 of the Environmental Scan is primarily descriptive with some limited analysis of the quality of intervention (using meta-evaluation) and identification of gaps and indicators of innovation. -- p. 3 ; ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Environmental scan part 2 : views of experts on effective employment interventions for people with disability / Shelley Mallett, Diane Brown and James Finnis (BSL)

by Mallett, Shelley | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Brown, Diane | Finnis, James.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 26 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Environmental Scan Part 2 (Research Report) | Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability Project [Website] Notes: Environmental Scan part 1 and Environment Scan Part 2 are linked to the Economic Participation and Employment for People with Disability project. To learn more about the project click the website link. Summary: This report details findings from Part 2 of an Environmental Scan of current practice of employment interventions and research for people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability. The Environmental Scan includes: 1. A desktop scan of current and recent Australian research; and current models, practices, and innovations within Australia and internationally (2015-2021 inclusive) (Environmental Scan Part 1: desktop review of current research and interventions to promote economic participation of people with a disability). 2. Interviews and focus groups with experts in the disability employment policy and program field (presented in this report). This Environmental Scan is one component of a broader project commissioned by the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) designed to examine the scope and evidence for different interventions that improve the economic participation and employment of people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disabilities. The project will help provide the NDIA with the best available evidence regarding the effectiveness of different employment interventions. Alongside the Environmental Scan, the full project also includes a Systematic Review, including a review of the theoretical evidence (see Systematic Review Technical Report and Summary Report). Scope of the Environmental Scan Part 2: This report addresses the third question proposed by the NDIA for the Environmental Scan: what are the views of experts in the field on effective employment interventions for people with a disability (with a focus on people with autism, intellectual disability and/or psychosocial disability)? The report details findings from a series of focus groups and interviews with academics and senior government and non-government executives who hold deep expertise in disability employment policy and programs. Interviews and focus groups were conducted over a one-month period at the end of 2020. Participating experts were invited to provide insight into the critical aspects of effective employment programs and practices based on their knowledge and experience. Focus group and interview discussions centred around three key sub-questions in relation to the disability employment intervention field: What is working? ; What is not working? ; What is missing? ; ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Achieving a 'sense of purpose' : pathways to employment for NDIS participants with intellectual disability, on the autism spectrum and/with psychosocial disability / Prepared by Lizzie Smith,A Ames, Matthew Bennett etal (NDIA)

by Smith, Lizzie | National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) | Ames, A | Bennett, Matthew et al.

Publisher: [S.l.] : National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA), 2021; © The National Disability Insurance AgencyDescription: 95 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Achieving a ‘sense of purpose’: research report.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The research project: This research project was aimed at exploring the barriers and enablers to gaining and maintaining paid employment for NDIS participants with intellectual disability, on the autism spectrum, and/or with psychosocial disability. This research included: In-depth interviews with 85 NDIS participants (families, carers or informal or formal supporters) aged 14 to 44 years; Focus groups and interviews with 37 NDIS service delivery staff (NDIS planners or delegates, Local Area Coordinators (LACs), Partners in the Community (PiTC) and Subject Matter Experts (SMEs); and Responses from 142 NDIS service delivery staff to an online survey. Interviews and focus groups were conducted via video online, telephone, or email. Key insights: A lack of inclusive employment options was identified by participants as the greatest barrier to finding a job. This included the lack of flexibility or inclusivity of workplace environments and the stigma of psychosocial disability and autism spectrum. Participants also identified issues with the support they received from the NDIS, such as a feeling of not being well understood by service delivery staff and the lack of clarity around the funding and supports available. This was supplemented by the complexity of the system. Further barriers included: Lack of discourse about careers and focus of short term employment goals; Lack of post-school training and education options and clarity about what supports and services are available to support these; and Participants lack of self-confidence. Person-centred employment planning was identified as a key enabler to supporting participants to achieve their career aspirations, as was starting employment and planning conversations early (e.g. while in school), and participant’s own networks, informal supports and role models. Six key areas of influence and opportunities for action emerged from the data: 1. Person-centred planning and supports 2. Participant empowerment and engagement 3. Informal and own networks 4. School level and early intervention initiatives 5. Formal education and training post school 6. Inclusive, flexible and adaptive workplaces Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Economic insecurity and intimate partner violence in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic / Anthony Morgan ; Hayley Boxall ; ANROWS

by Morgan, Anthony | Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety | Boxall, Hayley.

Publisher: Sydney, NSW : Australia's National Research Organisation for Women's Safety (ANROWS), 2022Description: iv, 70 p. ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted significant concerns about the “shadow pandemic” of violence against women and children, in particular intimate partner violence (IPV). There is now a large body of research in Australia exploring the effects of the pandemic on violence against women and children, and specifically IPV. The research has indicated that matters being referred to IPV services are more complex, and victims and survivors are experiencing increased barriers to reporting IPV and seeking support. Economic insecurity and intimate partner violence in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic, led by Anthony Morgan and Hayley Boxall at the Australian Institute of Criminology, focuses on the intersection of economic insecurity and women’s experiences of IPV in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. The findings are based on a survey of 10,000 women in Australia, aged 18 years and over, administered between February and April 2021. This report represents Stage 2 of a larger national study, with Stage 1 focusing on women’s experiences of IPV more broadly during the first 12 months of the pandemic. The report found that experiences of economic insecurity were common among women during the first 12 months of COVID-19. Economic insecurity was associated with an increased likelihood of IPV among women and co-occurred with other vulnerabilities reported by women which were associated with an increased likelihood of IPV. The report also found that economic disparity within relationships was associated with IPV – even after controlling for economic insecurity. The relationship between economic status, stress and disparity and IPV varied according to the type of IPV, and whether it was experienced as a chronic condition or an acute stressor. Finally, consistent with other Australian and international research, there was clear evidence that the acute economic stressors associated with the COVID-19 pandemic were associated with both the onset and escalation of IPV. [website] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
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