Brotherhood of St Laurence

Disability & employment (BSL)

This list contains 20 titles

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"It is like they just don't trust us" : balancing trust and control in the provision of disability employment services /

by Nevile, Ann | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Lohmann, Rosemary.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian National University. Crawford School of Economics and Government 2011Description: xi, 80 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011 The research underlying this report was supported by an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant. Jobs Australia, ACE National and the Brotherhood of St Laurence were Industry Partners in this research and provided both financial and practical support. INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This research project provides an independent mid-term review of the new contracting arrangements introduced on 1 March 2010. In doing so, it takes up the question as to whether closer alignment to the funding arrangements used in mainstream employment services where design principles broadly derive from agency theory, allows disability employment service providers to meet the government?s goal of ?effective?tailored services that are flexible and responsive? (Australian Government, nd).Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Addressing entrenched disadvantage in Australia / Committee for Economic Development of Australia ; with support from ACIL Allen Consulting.

by Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) | ACIL Allen Consulting.

Publisher: Melbourne : CEDA, 2015Description: 1 electronic text ([98] p. : ill.) : PDF file.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Link to website Notes: "April 2015"Summary: Entrenched disadvantage - long-term, persistent, and chronic disadvantage - is a 'wicked problem' in Australia, and current government policies to remove entrenchment are not working. This paper explains the nature and scope of entrenched disadvantage and calls for new policies that work to both lessen disadvantage and make sure it does not become entrenched. To explore these issues in more detail, the paper features three chapters that examine the particular key areas of education gaps, Indigenous disadvantage, and mental illness. These chapters are written by noted experts Peter Saunders, Francisco Azpitarte, Eve Bodsworth, Anne Hampshire, Nicholas Biddle, and Lorna Moxham.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
All in it together? : financial wellbeing before COVID-19 / Emily Porter, Dina Bowman and Matthew Curry (RPC)

by Porter, Emily | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Curry, Matthew | Bowman, Dina.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2020Description: 28 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Our analysis of Roy Morgan Single Source Survey data showed that financial wellbeing in Australia improved in the two years before the COVID-19 crisis, but not all groups experienced the same improvements. At a glance In the two years up to March 2020, unemployed workers, single parents, disability pensioners, young people and renters did not share the overall improvement in financial wellbeing. Dive deeper In this first paper in a series on financial wellbeing in Australia we explore patterns and trends in the two years prior to the COVID-19 crisis, We identify where structural barriers limit the ability of vulnerable groups to improve their financial wellbeing and build long-term economic security. We use ANZ's Financial Wellbeing Indicator, which draws on multiple questions in the continuous Roy Morgan Single Source Survey. The Indicator brings together three dimensions based on Kempson and colleagues’ (2017) model of financial wellbeing: • respondents’ ability to meet everyday commitments • how financially secure they feel • and their resilience to negative shocks. Each survey respondent is scored from 0 to 100 for each dimension, and the average of the three scores is reported as the overall Financial Wellbeing Indicator score. Our analysis of the two-year period to March 2020 highlighted unequal patterns in financial wellbeing, including: • Increases in the ability to Meet Commitments were stronger among higher income households, with an average improvement of almost 7%, than among lower income households (just under 4%). • Unemployed workers spent almost 90% of their income on living expenses, leaving limited scope for saving. • In contrast to every other household type (coupled parents, couples and single adults), Financial Wellbeing scores for single parents declined, by 6%. •Among Disability Support Pensioners Financial Wellbeing scores decreased, driven by a sharp 21% decline in their ability to Meet Commitments. • Among young people (aged 18 to 29), Feeling Comfortable scores declined by 4%, though overall Financial Wellbeing increased by 4%. • Renters continued to experience weaker financial wellbeing, with scores around 30% lower than home owners and 15% below those with mortgages. This report is part of the Financial Lives in Uncertain Times project. The research was made possible by the generous support of ANZ through the ANZ Tony Nicholson Fellowship and the provision under licence of Roy Morgan Single Source Survey data. ; December 2020 Includes bibliographical references. ; Contents : Summary -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Inequality and insecurity before COVID 19 -- 3 Financial choices and wellbeing -- 4 Data and approach to analysis -- 5 Findings : Before the COVID-19 crisis, overall financial wellbeing in Australia was increasing, but not for everyone ; Why are some Australian falling behind when it comes to financial wellbeing? --- 6 Responding to the crisis and creating financial wellbeing for all -- References Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
BSL response to the Review of the Residential Tenancies Act options discussion paper

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2017Description: [12 p.] : ill. PDF.Other title: BSL submission to the Review of the Residential Tenancies Act options discussion paper.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: 24 February 2017Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence acknowledges the significant work that has gone into the review of the Residential Tenancies Act to date. We have appreciated the chance to participate in the review, including through membership of the Stakeholder Reference Group, written submissions and engagement with you, your office and your department. We are investing considerable efforts in rental law reform because of the urgent need to improve housing security, stability and affordability for the increasing numbers of people and families in Victoria reliant on rental accommodation for the long term. Our particular focus is on the intersection of rental laws with more vulnerable Victorians: those on low incomes; people with disability; older adults; newly arrived communities and survivors of family violence. Residential tenancies reform is a key element of the bigger challenge of housing security and affordability. It is critical that the next iteration of the RTA recognises and protects the public good associated with stable housing and respects rental properties as people’s homes. The Act needs to be updated to reflect the reality that a large and increasing proportion of households – particularly those with vulnerabilities and on lower incomes – will be reliant on renting throughout their lives. Reforms need to squarely address the insecurity faced by tenants: the risk of arbitrary terminations; substandard properties; problematic repair provisions; inefficient properties causing inflated energy bills; poor access to advice, advocacy and dispute resolution procedures; discrimination; and limited protection against excessive rent increases. Availability: (1)
Dead ends : how our social security system is failing people with partial capacity to work / Karen Soldatic, Dina Bowman, Maria Mupanemunda & Patrick McGee (BSL)

by Soldatic, Karen | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Bowman, Dina | Mupanemunda, Maria | McGee, Patrick | University of Western Sydney | Australian Federation of Disability Organisations (AFDO).

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 32 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Abstract: Almost one-third of JobSeeker Payment recipients are people assessed as unable to work more than 15 hours a week. They face an uncertain future, with inadequate income support and little prospect of gaining employment in a competitive labour market. At a glance: The growing group of people on JobSeeker Payment who are deemed to have ‘partial capacity to work’ reflects a decade of changes to tighten eligibility and assessment for social security payments, especially the Disability Support Pension. The impact on many people with disability and/or chronic health conditions has been severe. Enabling economic security for these vulnerable people requires reforms across intersecting areas including the social safety net and employment assistance. Dive deeper: The partial capacity to work category illustrates how the social security system fails many vulnerable individuals, due to design faults that create poverty traps. This report examines the development of this classification and its impact on the lives of individuals and their households. It considers the onerous processes involved in applying and for the Disability Support Pension, and the economic and social costs of having to live instead on the much lower JobSeeker Payment with extra obligations. It also points to structural barriers facing people with disability and/or chronic health conditions in seeking employment. It recommends urgent policy changes in intersecting systems – especially social security and employment assistance – to enable people who cannot work full-time due to disability or ill health to gain economic security and live with dignity. This research was supported through a generous donation to BSL from ANZ. The authors of the report are from Western Sydney University (Karen Soldatic); BSL (Dina Bowman and Maria Mupanemunda); and the Australian Federation of Disability Organisations (AFDO) (Patrick McGee). Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Decent sustainable work for all in a global economy : submission to the Independent Inquiry into Insecure Work in Australia /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2011 Bibliography : p. 37-40Summary: A comprehensive reform agenda can deliver growth for Australia through a more productive and engaged labour force which better meets employer needs; increased participation and advancement in paid work for all workers; and reduced levels of social exclusion. This is sustainable growth with inclusion. The growth of casual, contract and insecure work is one outcome of long-run trends in the Australian economy. But it is not the only outcome. Our assessment shows that the labour market is also characterised by stubborn levels of workforce underutilisation, and significant levels of marginal attachment and exclusion from paid work. These trends are not short-term or cyclic effects of economic downturns such as the current GFC. Thirty years ago, the underemployment rate was only 2.6%. The present underutilisation rate (12.6%) of the labour force represents over 1.5 million Australians of working age. In addition, there are over 800,000 Australians with a disability - many of whom with the right form of assistance could gain paid employment.Availability: (1)
Empowering disadvantaged households to access affordable, clean energy

by The Climate Institute | Australian Council of Social Service | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Australian Council of Social Service Brotherhood of St Laurence The Climate Institute 2017Description: 71 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: A new report shows actions needed so that all Australians can access affordable, reliable and clean energy. A smooth and timely transition to a modern clean energy system is desirable and achievable. However, Australia's energy system is in disarray, and low income and disadvantaged households are bearing the brunt of increasing costs. Urgent attention is needed to ensure the transition is affordable, equitable and inclusive. This joint report from ACOSS, the Brotherhood of St Laurence and The Climate Institute highlights the myriad issues facing low-income and disadvantaged households as the electricity sector transitions, and points to areas for reform. This report draws on recent commissioned research and consultations with over 120 community and energy stakeholders. The recommendations are grouped in five outcome areas: 1. Electricity priced efficiently, including integrated climate policy 2. Informed and enabled consumers 3. Energy consumed efficiently and productively 4. Robust consumer protections 5. All households having capacity to paySummary: A smooth, fair and expeditious transition to a modern clean energy system is both desirable and achievable. However, Australia’s energy system is in disarray, and low-income and disadvantaged households are bearing the brunt of it. Urgent attention is needed to ensure the transition is affordable, equitable and inclusive. Currently there are about 3 million people, including over 731,000 children, living below the poverty line in Australia. The number of people who struggle with energy stress is likely to be much higher than the poverty figures. Households more likely to be vulnerable to energy stress are those subsisting on unemployment or student allowances, pensioners, renters, single-parent families, people living in poverty while in paid work, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and households where someone has a disability or medical condition. There is universal agreement that access to reliable and affordable electricity is a basic and essential human right. It is critical to the health, wellbeing, economic participation and social inclusion of all people. Despite being an essential service, electricity prices are skyrocketing, disconnections have increased, the number of households experiencing measurable hardship has risen, and more households are rationing energy to the detriment of their health and well-being. This is overlaid with a housing affordability crisis, low wage inflation, and long-term unemployment which has tripled since the global financial crisis – with only one job for every ten people looking for paid work. In addition, gas prices have become unaffordable, some networks continue to over-invest, retail competition is failing to reduce prices, coal-fired power plants have unexpectedly closed leaving workers and communities struggling, the reliability of supply is becoming an increasing issue in some regions, and greenhouse gas emissions are increasing. The lack of policy certainty is now one of the biggest drivers of wholesale electricity price rises. Efforts to provide access to affordable, reliable and clean energy – dubbed the ‘energy trilemma’ – are failing. A decade of policy instability; regulatory inaction; failure to better align climate, energy and social policy; and blame-shifting among federal and state governments is central to the deterioration of every element of the energy trilemma. [Executive summary - Extract]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
How to achieve better outcomes and lives through service user inclusion in the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) / Amanda Pagan (Winston Churchill Memorial Trust)

by Pagan, Amanda | Winston Churchill Memorial Trust.

Publisher: Acton, ACT : [Winston Churchill Memorial Trust], [2018]Description: 45 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: The Jack Brockhoff Foundation Churchill Fellowship to investigate the success of outcomes based contracting In disability services - Uk, Ireland, New Zealand, Sweden.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Website Summary: Project description: My Churchill Fellowship report examines some good practices from around the globe in the policy making cycle, inclusive of policy setting, commissioning, service design and delivery and evaluation. The report makes recommendations of potential interest to service providers and user led organisations that work with and for people with disability, their families and carers. Highlights: My highlights for the trip were visiting Leeds City Council in the United Kingdom and Yes Disability Resource Centre in New Zealand. Both organisations were practice exemplars of engaging children and young people in parts of the policy cycle. The advantages of their approach are demonstrated by an improvement in service outcomes and a more empowered service user group. Findings: In essence my report demonstrated that effective inclusion of children and young people in the policy cycle can improve outcomes. This work needs to be supported by: organisations which are capable and practiced at supporting children and young people to develop their voices; a genuine intention to hear and respond to the voices of children and young people with disability in the policy cycle; a clearly articulated set of principles, practices and outcomes desired as a result of including children and young people in the policy cycle; service providers and policy makers who are prepared to share power, be creative and brave; the development and creation of a safe trusting place for hearing and responding to service users; a strong evidence base of 'what works' for children and young people, particularly in relation to participatory processes in the NDIS. Dissemination: Since returning to Australia I have already commenced my dissemination efforts. This has included presenting at the joint Australian Council of Social Services and Department of Social Services Commissioning workshop. In addition I will be presenting to the National Disability Services Research Network Group and the Power to Persuade Conference and other Disability specific conferences. In addition to formal presentations, I will also be conducting a series of informal workshops for NDIS service providers and other organisations in Victoria, including The Brotherhood of St Laurence to further the discussion and trial some projects. Some work is also planned to form an alliance of key peak bodies to lobby for change and better inclusions of children and young people in the NDIS policy cycle.[Executive Summary] ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Interventions for children on the autism spectrum : response to NDIA Consultation / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 8 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) welcomes the opportunity to respond to the NDIS consultation on Interventions for Children on the Autism Spectrum. BSL welcomes the stated intention of the proposed changes – i.e. to streamline and create certainty and consistency for participants and their families and carers through a ‘focus on what should constitute reasonable and necessary early intervention supports for children on the autism spectrum’. While we generally support the identified principles and standards and suggest the standards could be usefully elevated to guidelines, we ask the Agency to identify how the standards will be implemented and monitored. BSL does, however, hold concerns about the model of budget allocation, the rationale for it and the process undertaken to implement the changes. In addition, we are concerned that this model implies that children with autism require a separate model of service provision, and believe that is inequitable and against the Principles of the NDIS Act. BSL recommends that NDIA: 1. Clarify how Independent Assessments (IA) will translate into the levels identified for children with autism, and how the IA and planning process will be undertaken. 2. Pilot the proposed IA and planning process for children on the autism spectrum to ascertain its effectiveness and impacts. 3. Remove the association of funding levels with a specific diagnosis. 4. Halt work on the proposed interventions model and funding for children on the autism spectrum, in line with the IA process, to allow time: o to incorporate changes and any developments to the process resulting from the IA trial and Minister’s consultations; and o to undertake a trial of the proposed model for children on the autism spectrum. 5. Clarify the basis for the proposed funding model, including age-based categorisation, and provide data on dual diagnosis and plan budget utilisation as an evidence base for funding levels. 6. Undertake a more comprehensive consultation with families and carers, and with providers, to develop a model that best meets the needs and goals of children on the autism spectrum, in line with Scheme principles and intent, and with ECEI reset recommendations. 7. Develop tools and resources, in collaboration with families and carers, and providers, to support families’ and carers’ decision making and understanding of the autism interventions and supports.[Summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Losing traction : lessons in financial wellbeing from the COVID crisis / Emily Porter and Dina Bowman (BSL)

by Porter, Emily | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Bowman, Dina.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 8 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Our analysis of financial wellbeing over three time periods finds that Australians on low incomes are more exposed to risks, making them vulnerable to a crisis such as the COVID-19 pandemic. At a glance: As Australia begins to reopen and the hope blooms that life will return to normal, it is easy to feel that the worst of the COVID-19 crisis is over. However, our research suggests recovery for people on low incomes will be slow. For some the financial impacts from COVID will likely be long term. Dive deeper: We use ANZ's Financial Wellbeing Indicator, which draws on multiple questions in the continuous Roy Morgan Single Source survey. The Indicator brings together three dimensions based on Kempson and colleagues’ (2017) model of financial wellbeing. These include the ability to meet everyday commitments, feeling comfortable about one’s financial situation and resilience to financial shocks. Our latest research analysed ANZ Roy Morgan Financial Wellbeing data from the pre-COVID period (April 2018 to March 2020), through the 2020 COVID peak (April 2020 to September 2020) and the initial recovery (October 2020 to March 2021). Less secure work and an inadequate and conditional social safety net have reduced public protection from financial shocks while making it harder for many individuals to build their own protective savings buffer. Our analysis shows the COVID crisis impacted financial wellbeing as follows. • Income support recipients got a brief reprieve from poverty, which ended as temporary income supplements were wound back: • Unemployed workers on JobSeeker reported a 10% improvement in meeting commitments in the 2020 COVID peak, then a 19% decline. • Single parents not in employment entered the crisis with Meeting Commitments scores 43% below the Australian average. These rose by a modest 2%, before falling by 16%. • Disability Support Pensioners not in employment) benefited from lump sum economic support payments, increasing their ability to meet commitments by 14% during the high COVID period of 2020, then falling back by 15%. Many low-income workers missed out on support, with long-term consequences: • 52% of workers in the lowest 20% of households by income reported losing employment, work hours or income due to COVID, compared to 28% of workers in the top 60% of households by income. This led to a 19% fall in ability to meet commitments from the pre-COVID period. • The percentage of male workers with debts in the bottom 20% of households by income increased by 18 points to 58%. Women in the same group showed a 5-point increase in the percentage with debt to 48% and a net decline in those with superannuation by 7 points. Stopping the downward spiral of financial stress requires a decent social safety net, access to quality employment that allows people to build their own resilience, and a robust social infrastructure base that delivers dignity and opportunity. This report is part of the Financial Lives in Uncertain Times project. The research was made possible by the generous support of ANZ through the ANZ Tony Nicholson Fellowship and the provision under licence of Roy Morgan Single Source Survey data. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Mental health : Submission to the Senate Select Committee /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: 2005; Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2004Summary: The BSL welcomes this opportunity to contribute to the Inquiry by the Senate Select Committee on Mental Health. Although not a mental health service provider, many of the people with whom the BSL works are living with mental health problems, contributing to the disadvantage they experience. The Terms of Reference are broader than BSL experience or expertise. This submission, therefore, focuses on those Terms of Reference of greatest relevance to our work and to the lives of the people we support. Our starting point is that many people living with a mental illness experience levels of exclusion and discrimination that are unacceptable?and addressing the complexity of issues that compound this exclusion requires concerted leadership and action by all levels of government..Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1), BSL Archives (1).
Personal Support Programme evaluation : interim report

by Perkins, Daniel | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2005Description: viii, 55 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography: p. 52-55 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: The aim of this study is to evaluate how well the Personal Support Programme (PSP) enables people with multiple non-vocational barriers to achieve economic and/or social outcomes. Interim findings suggest that PSP is a crucial and well-designed program for assisting some of the most disadvantaged job seekers, but that several factors reduce its effectiveness notably, inadequate funding to help clients access services such as education and counselling to overcome barriers. While PSP s recognition that some participants are unable to engage in employment-related activities before addressing personal barriers is vital, the lack of appropriate employment assistance integrated with personal support is an unfortunate limitation for those participants who feel ready to look for work.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Response to NDIS consultation paper : Supporting young children and their families early to reach their full potential / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 19 p. PDF.Other title: Supporting young children and their families early to reach their full potential : response to NDIS consultation paper.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The NDIS review of the Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) Approach aims to ensure a better experience for young children and their families. The recommendations for a reset, developed with sector consultation, and the opportunities for input into the aims and recommendations of the reset have been welcomed by Brotherhood of St. Laurence (BSL) staff. BSL fully supports 17 of the 23 recommendations. For these, we have made some specific observations, including the need to build Early Childhood partner capacity through a workforce strategy and resourcing to ensure successful implementation. BSL partially supports, or supports in principle, another five recommendations, with our reasons included in this response. • We do not support recommendation 9 overall, due to limited information about such a significant change to key processes for young children, though we see merit in some elements of the recommendation. The issue of independent assessments has raised concerns for participants and their families, and services. It is not yet clear what is proposed for access and planning but there is support for a comprehensive assessment including observation, use of standardised tools and consideration of family capability and circumstances, but concerns about use of the results to inform access and planning decisions including budgets. BSL suggests the concept of ‘a plan for all’ using NDIS Early Childhood Services. Such a plan would support a better experience for participants and families, as it could be used differently as needs change. A plan might or might not include funded supports, and could minimise the concept of transition as the plan would apply before, during and after their provision. BSL welcomes the opportunity to continue to work with NDIA to deliver a better experience for NDIS Early Childhood service users including participants, and their families. [Summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Response to the exposure draft of the NDIS Amendment (Participant Service Guarantee and Other Measures) Bill 2021 / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Mallett, Shelley | Hall, Susan.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 6 p. PDF.Other title: BSL response to exposure draft of the NDIS Amendment (Participant Service Guarantee and Other Measures) Bill 2021.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: BSL is an NDIS Partner in the Community. We have been delivering LAC in five regions across Victoria since July 2016 as part of the first phase of NDIS implementation. We commenced as an ECEI provider in November 2016, and now work with around 40,000 people with a disability in LAC and ECEI. We welcome the opportunity to provide a response to the Exposure Draft of the NDIS Amendment (Participant Service Guarantee and Other Measures) Bill 2021. BSL supports the intent of the draft Bill to improve participant experience and simplify processes through: the inclusion of the Participant Service Guarantee and Participant Engagement Principles into the Act ; recognition of people with disability as central to the Scheme and the need to engage them in codesign of the Scheme and its processes ; capacity building and choice and control for people with disability ; acknowledgement of the important relationships between people with disability, their families and carers ; scope to vary plans ; clarification of the role of the Quality and Safety Commission, and expanding the Commonwealth Ombudsman’s powers to report on the performance of the NDIA. On the other hand, we identify several critical concerns in the proposed changes in the Exposure Draft, which we detail in our submission. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Shocks and safety nets : financial wellbeing during the COVID-19 crisis / Emily Porter and Dina Bowman (RPC)

by Porter, Emily | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Bowman, Dina.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 32 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: At a glance: Our analysis of Roy Morgan Single Source Survey data showed that financial wellbeing for most in Australia during the peak of the COVID-19 crisis (April 2020 to September 2020) declined. Low-income workers, particularly women, were most vulnerable. However, for others COVID came with a silver lining. The Coronavirus Supplement, an extra fortnightly payment for many receiving income support, made it easier to make ends meet in the short term, although it could not provide long-term security. Even with this supplement, many drew on superannuation or savings. Dive deeper: Our paper explores the financial impacts of the COVID-19 crisis on vulnerable Australians, identifying the social structures that helped or hindered them during the height of the COVID-19 crisis. We use ANZ's Financial Wellbeing Indicator, which draws on multiple questions in the continuous Roy Morgan Single Source survey. The Indicator brings together three dimensions based on Kempson and colleagues’ (2017) model of financial wellbeing: •respondents’ ability to meet everyday commitments •how financially secure they feel •and their resilience to negative shocks. Each survey respondent is scored from 0 to 100 for each dimension, and the average of the three scores is reported as the overall Financial Wellbeing Indicator score. For most people, the COVID crisis led to a decline in financial wellbeing, driven by a sharp fall in the Feeling Comfortable dimension. People with low incomes, particularly those in the workforce, faced more serious declines. For example, low-income workers showed a 21% decline in ability to Meet Commitments from the pre-COVID period to the September 2020 quarter. On the other hand, COVID-19 responses made it easier for those relying on income support to buy essentials and pay bills on time: •While Meeting Commitments scores fell for low-income workers scores for households that relied on income support payments c actually improved in the COVID period. •Unemployed workers who were likely to have access to JobSeeker Payments reported a 10% improvement in ability to meet commitments during the COVID period, as did single parents and disability support pensioners who were not in employment. •Some financial impacts of the COVID-19 crisis will be long-term: •Many vulnerable groups in employment reported declines in financial resilience during the COVID period as work hours fell, forcing many to draw down their savings. These included workers in the lowest income quintile and those relying on disability support pensions. •The proportion of low income women with superannuation declined by 6 percentage points. Single parents not in employment showed an even larger 10 percentage points decline. Our findings suggest that harmful impacts from the crisis were less severe where people had access to government support as well as their own savings or other resources. Real, widespread recovery will require not only adequate social security that allows resilience but also investment in full employment and social infrastructure such as affordable housing. This report is part of the Financial Lives in Uncertain Times project. The research was made possible by the generous support of ANZ through the ANZ Tony Nicholson Fellowship and the provision under licence of Roy Morgan Single Source survey data. ; Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Submission to the Education Council Review of Senior Secondary Pathways

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 32 p. PDF.Other title: Submission to the COAG Education Council Review of Senior Secondary Pathways.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: December 2019Summary: This submission draws on the Brotherhood’s deep understanding of the supports and conditions that young Australians need to navigate the transition from school to work. We have a long history of research and evaluations into the related issues of work, vocational education and training, school engagement and attainment, and employer partnerships. We also have long experience in developing and delivering services for young people who, for both structural and individual reasons, struggle to make this transition. Strategic partnerships with educators, employers, industry bodies, governments and the community are key to our approach. Our submission focuses on the senior secondary pathways experiences of young people experiencing disadvantage—including those from lower income households, living in locations of disadvantage, experiencing disability, with low English language proficiency, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander background. There is a stark gap in terms of school engagement, educational attainment and uptake of further and higher education between young people experiencing disadvantage and their peers. Just over 60% of young people from the lowest SES group achieve Year 12 or equivalent in contrast to almost 90% of their peers at the other end of the SES scale. While less than half of all young people go on to attend university, just a quarter of those in the lowest SES quintile do. Vocational education and training is the major gateway to skills, qualifications and employment for young people experiencing disadvantage. However, VET participation rates of equity groups are going backwards. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to the NDIS Thin Markets Project Consultation Department of Social Services

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2019Description: 27 p. PDF.Other title: Submission to the Department of Social Services NDIS Thin Markets Project Consultation | BSL submission to the NDIS Thin Markets Project Consultation .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: July 2019 Summary: The scope, scale and timeframe for establishment of the NDIS market make its development particularly complicated. The market must cover all types of disability and enormous geographical spread, as well as other types of diversity (e.g. culturally and linguistically diverse communities and people experiencing poverty). These challenges are becoming more evident as the scheme is rolled out. Many participants and their families report they are waiting too long for support, are unable to implement their plan and are struggling to navigate the new and complex system (Joint Standing Committee 2018a). Providers report they continue to struggle to maintain financial viability while delivering quality services and meeting administrative requirements, leading to a steady pace of market exit for certain services (Mathys & Randall 2019). Some of these challenges are technical and transitional (i.e. a matter of poor implementation and/or the predictable adjustments that come with a reform of this scale). However, we contend that many of the challenges outlined in the Discussion Paper are arising because market-based service provision simply does not work for everyone. This view is grounded in evidence from Australia and overseas, as well as our own service experience. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Submission to the Senate Community Affairs Legislation Committee inquiry into the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Consistent Waiting Periods for New Migrants) Bill 2021 / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 5 p. PDF.Other title: Submission to inquiry into the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Consistent Waiting Periods for New Migrants) Bill 2021 / | Submission to inquiry into Consistent Waiting Periods for New Migrants 2021.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: We note our submission to the Committee’s inquiry into the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Encouraging Self-Sufficiency for Newly Arrived Migrants) Bill 2018, which similarly proposed to extend the Newly Arrived Resident’s Waiting Period (NARWP) for certain social security payments. The concerns raised in that submission have only been reinforced by further evidence from inquiries, the impact of COVID-19 and other recent challenges posed to new migrants. Our concerns about the measures set out in this Bill are directly informed by our research and work withnewly arrived people in our early childhood, youth, training, employment, aged care and disability services. The Bill is not in the public interest: This Bill advances bad policy. It is mid-twentieth century policy resuscitated for the twenty-first. The Bill will not only harm new migrants, but also the Australian public more broadly. It misses the evident contribution of migrants to our community. While migration is a key driver of productivity in Australia, the Bill is likely to act as a disincentive to migration. This undermines our national reputation and affects our prospects for economic prosperity based on a balanced population profile. And it does so at the very time when the impacts of population decline on productivity are evident as a consequence of COVID-19. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
The National Disability Insurance Scheme : an Australian public policy experiment / Mhairi Cowden, Claire McCullagh, editors.

by Cowden, Mhairi, 1986- [editor.] | McCullagh, Claire [editor.].

Publisher: Singapore : Palgrave Macmillan, [2021]Copyright date: c 2021Description: xxiii, 451 p. : illustrations (some color).Summary: The National Disability Insurance Scheme (known commonly as the NDIS) was introduced as a radical new way of funding disability services in Australia. It is a rare moment in politics and policy making that an idea as revolutionary, ambitious and expensive as the NDIS makes it into its implementation phase. Not surprising, then, that the NDIS has been described by many as the biggest social shift in Australia since Medicare. This book will be a key text for scholars and public policy professionals wishing to understand the NDIS, how it was designed, and lessons learned through its introduction and roll-out. The book addresses how the NDIS has intersected with particular cohorts and sectors, and some of the challenges that have arisen. It highlights the experiences of people with disability through a collection of personal stories from participants and families in the NDIS. The key insights from this large scale public policy experiment are relevant for anyone interested in social change in Australia, or internationally. Mhairi Cowden is a public policy professional and researcher. She has worked for the Department of the Premier and Cabinet in Western Australia advising on community services including the NDIS. Her previous publications include Childrens Rights: From Philosophy to Public Policy. She holds a PhD from the Australian National University. Claire McCullagh is currently a Director at Nous Group, Australia. She is a consultant and public policy professional. She has previously held senior policy positions within the Western Australian Government, including the Department of the Premier and Cabinet, the Mental Health Commission and the Disability Services Commission. She holds a Master of Public Policy from the University of Oxford.Availability: No items available Checked out (1).
Welfare reform? : following the 'work-first' way. /

by Carney, Terry | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Melbourne, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence and Centre for Public Policy, University of Melbourne 2007=260 2007Description: 14 p.Other title: Social policy working paper ; no. 7.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2007 Bibliography : 11-14Summary: Terry Carney examines the job-first rationale underpinning the Australian Government s 2005 06 welfare-to-work changes. He traces the move away from Australia s historic welfare settlement, describing it as a move from social security policy to labour market policy. He considers the implications of the 1 July 2006 changes for new claimants for sole parent and disability payments, who are effectively obliged to accept almost any job. Carney argues that what is new for Australia is that these work-first policies are now pursued within a deregulated industrial relations environment and without political debate about alternatives such as the investment state or the third way policies of Britain and parts of Europe.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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