Brotherhood of St Laurence

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The Missing Link? : young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds, social capital and the transitions to employment.

by Kellock, W | Centre for Multicultural Youth.

Publisher: Carlton, Vic. Centre for Multicultural Youth 2016Description: 40 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This paper aims to develop a deeper understanding of the way in which young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds experience social capital in relation to work transitions, particularly for those who are tertiary educated. This is with the intention of exploring how best to support the breadth and quality of young people’s networks to facilitate the transition to meaningful work. Access to bridging capital for the purposes of employment is an issue of equity – an essential link that is often missing for young people with a refugee or migrant experience. It is all of our responsibility to ensure these connections can be made and that meaningful work is accessible to all. The future of both our young people and our society depends on it.Availability: (1)

Transition to work community of practice : practice guide

by Brown, Diane | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | James, Sally | Mallett, Shelley | McTiernan, Niamh | Orchard, Nicholas | Cull, Emma.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2017Description: iv, 75 p. ill.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: August 2017 First published in March 2017; To develop this Practice Guide, BSL led a co-design process with the Transition to Work Community of Practice. Collectively, the CoP organisations tested and refined a number of foundational documents and tools; the feedback and expertise of their managers and CEOs, and the Youth Development Coaches and Employer Engagement Officers of each of these organsations (listed below), was instrumental in the development of this Practice Guide: Workways, Gen-Z Employment, Vocational Partnerships Group, School Industry Partnership, Australia Community Support Organisation, Colony 47, YouthWorX NT, Joblink Midwest, Anglicare South Australia, Brophy Family and Youth Services Summary: For several years now, the BSL has been developing and testing a different approach to working with young people experiencing disadvantage across a number of settings including employment, education and housing. In particular the TtW CoP Model has drawn on the approach taken by the Youth Transitions Program (YTP)2 and the EFY Foyers. The YTP was initially developed by the BSL in 2010 and delivered across three sites in western Melbourne with the aim of building the work aspirations and capabilities of young people experiencing disadvantage to engage in further learning and/or work. It provided a structured training component as well as connections to real world opportunities, engagement with the local community and referral to health and wellbeing services. In 2014, the BSL and Launch Housing (formerly Hanover Welfare Services) developed the EFY Foyer model with three Victorian Foyers currently operating at co-located Technical and Further Education (TAFE) sites across Victoria – two in Melbourne at Holmesglen TAFE in Glen Waverly and Bendigo Kangan TAFE in Broadmeadows, and one at Shepparton’s GO TAFE in regional Victoria. EFY Foyers provide integrated learning and student accommodation in mainstream educational settings for young people who are at risk of or experiencing homelessness, and prepares them to build the foundations for a sustainable livelihood. The model embeds an Advantaged Thinking approach in all its practices, processes and tools, which are designed to promote and build young people’s aspirations, skills and capacities. By prioritising engagement with education, the model builds young people’s connections to mainstream education, services and opportunities. Coupled with the research and evaluative work conducted by the BSL’s Research and Policy Centre, the learnings from these programs have informed the development of a set of core principles and features of a model. Through the TtW Community of Practice, this model is being tested and refined using the extensive expertise of the TtW CoP members, and adapted to suit local community contexts. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Building skills for all in Australia : policy insights from the survey of adult skills.

by Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Publisher: Paris OECD Publishing. 2017Description: 86 p. ill.Online Access: OECD iLibrary (Read only) | Website Notes: BSL Staff see Library for e-copySummary: There is a shift from formal education to a broader perspective that includes a range of hard and soft skills people need to acquire over their lifetime in order to succeed in the labour market. Workers, students, parents, employers, education providers and government agencies now need reliable information on how supply and demand for skills evolve. The OECD Skills Studies series aims to provide a strategic approach to skills policies. It presents OECD internationally comparable indicators and policy analysis covering issues such as: quality of education and curricula; transitions from school to work; vocational education and training (VET); employment and unemployment; innovative workplace learning; entrepreneurship; brain drain and migrants; and skills matching with job requirements. Australia’s overall performance in the Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) ranges from average to very good. However, three million adults, representing one-fifth of the working age population, have low literacy and/or numeracy skills. Building Skills for All in Australia describes the characteristics of the low-skilled and discusses the consequences that low skills have on economic and social development for both individuals and Australian society. The review examines the strengths of the Australian skills system, highlighting the strong basic skills found in the migrant population, widespread proficiency in use of ICT and the positive role of workplaces in skills development. The study explores, moreover, the challenges facing the skills system and what can be done to enhance basic skills through education, training or other workplace measures. One of a series of studies on low basic skills, the review presents new analyses of PIAAC data and concludes with a series of policy recommendations. These include: increasing participation of women in STEM fields, addressing underperformance of post-secondary VET students and preventing drop-out, improving pre-apprenticeships, enhancing mathematics provision within secondary education and tackling poor access to childcare facilities for young mothers.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Unique individuals, broad skills : inquiry into school to work transition

by Australia. Parliament. House of Representatives Standing Committee on Employment, Education and Training.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Common Wealth of Australia 2018Description: xxiii, 104 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: May 2018 Summary: On Wednesday 31 May 2017, the Minister for Employment, Education and Training, Senator the Hon Simon Birmingham, referred to the Standing Committee on Employment, Education and Training (the Committee) an inquiry into how students are supported from school to work.Availability: (1)

Transition to Work National Community of Practice : insights from year 1

by van Kooy, John | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Brown, Diane | Bowman, Dina | Mallett, Shelley.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2017Description: 40 p. ill.Other title: Transition to Work National Community of Practice evaluation report.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: June 2017 Summary: This document presents summaries of the first three strands as three distinct but consecutive reports. The three reports can be read as standalone documents, or as a series. Report 1: Conceptual Framework for the National Community of Practice serves as a foundational document for the CoP, and importantly, for subsequent evaluation. The ambition of the CoP is to develop and demonstrate an alternative to traditional responses to addressing youth unemployment. This requires clarity about the problem to be addressed. Report 1 sets out our understanding of youth unemployment as a multi-level problem, and in turn outlines what should underpin an effective, multi-level solution. It does this by referencing relevant bodies of literature, and situating the rational for the CoP approach within the context of a changing human services sector. Report 2: Implementation of the Community of Practice Model uses interview data and self-reported scorecards to provide insights into the challenges and highlights of implementing the CoP model across 12 diverse locations,1 as well as the establishment of the CoP itself. Recommendations for Year 2 are provided, based on these insights. Report 3: Year 1 Outcome Review provides a review of the available data on young people participating in CoP TtW services for the period March – December 2016, focusing on cohort characteristics and outcomes achieved in the first two quarters of operation. The report also outlines some key learnings and recommendations in regards to data collection for the remainder of the CoP project. Recommendations and actions taken to address them are collated and presented on the next page. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

SVA perspectives : education

by Social Ventures Australia.

Publisher: [Brisbane, Qld] Social Ventures Australia, 2016Description: 31 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Education perspective paper.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: August 2016Summary: Educational outcomes are influenced by a person’s socioeconomic status. Those who experience disadvantage have a much higher risk than the general population of poor education outcomes. Education alone cannot address underlying disadvantage but SVA believes there should be an equal opportunity for all children to receive a high-quality education, tailored to their needs, to maximise the chance for them to develop the skills to participate fully in society (the ‘Education Goal’). High-quality education is the path to a sustainable, independent and meaningful livelihood. An individual’s lifetime earning capacity is largely determined by the age of 18 and education is one of the most important contributors.2 Children who do not receive a good education are at greater risk of later unemployment, earn less and are less likely to participate in the labour force.3 They are also more likely to be involved in crime4 and to become disadvantaged parents. There is a strong and well documented correlation between education, participation and productivity.5 For each extra year of education, a worker’s earnings rise by 5.5% to 11%, all other things being equal, and each extra year of education may raise productivity by 3% to 6%. If the percentage of young people completing year 12 rose from 80% to 90%, gross domestic product would be $1.8 b higher in 2020.6 Our Education Goal is in two distinct but related parts; (i) ensuring equal opportunity and (ii) providing high-quality education. We need to address both as there is little benefit if disadvantaged students have equal access to an education that is not appropriate for the modern economy. And disadvantaged students are also likely to fare worse than more advantaged young people who have the social capital to mitigate the impact of a misaligned formal education.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Looking to the future : report of the review of senior secondary pathways into work, further education and training

by Education Council | Shergold, Peter | Clama, Tom | Russo, Sarina et al.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Education Council, 2020Description: 176 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Shergold review of senior secondary pathways into work, further education and training.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: June 2020; Review Panel: Professor Peter Shergold AC (Chair), Professor Tom Calma AO, Ms Sarina Russo, Ms Patrea Walton PSM, Ms Jennifer Westacott AO, Dr Don Zoellner, Mr Patrick O’Reilly.Summary: The Review will provide Education Council with advice and recommendations on how senior secondary students can better understand and be enabled to choose the most appropriate pathway to support their transition into work, further education and/or training. In undertaking the review the expert panel will give consideration to the different contexts faced by disadvantaged students, including students with disability, those in regional, rural and remote areas, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

What future? : inquiry into youth employment and transitions / NYCA

by National Youth Commission Australia (NYCA).

Publisher: Collingwood, Vic. National Youth Commission Australia (NYCA), 2020Description: 73 p : ill. PDF.Other title: The National Youth Commission Australia’s Interim Findings Report.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The NYCA Inquiry’s Interim Report presents findings about the conditions for success needed by young people as they navigate their transitions from school to work, and from entry into the labour force towards sustainable employment. This is an Interim Report because the Inquiry process is designed to ensure that the Commission can validate our analysis of the evidence gathered and test the ideas for policy reform: better ways to engage young people; the resources that need to be invested, shared, or reconfigured; and suggestions about who needs to be involved in the changes. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Better prepared : essential skills and employment outcomes for young people / Elnaz Kashefpakdel, Tom Ravenscroft, Chris Percy (Skills Builder Partnership)

by Kashefpakdel, Elnaz | Skills Builder Partnership | Ravenscroft, Tom | Percy, Chris.

Publisher: London, U.K : Skills Builder Partnership, 2021Description: 51 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Ticket to Work : valuation of key outcomes / Social Ventures Australia Consulting

by Social Ventures Australia Consulting | Social Ventures Australia | Ticket to Work.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W Social Ventures Australia : 2020Description: 38 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This report draws on the data from that study to estimate two scenarios: a Ticket to Work scenario and a ‘Business as Usual’ scenario based on data about employment outcomes for young people with disability who did not participate in Ticket to Work. Figure 1 demonstrates the impact of Ticket to Work: far more participants are in the labour force, employed, and in open employment than would otherwise have been the case. -- page 1Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Ticket to Work [website] / Ticket to Work ; BSL

by Ticket to Work | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: [Fitzroy,Vic] : Brotherhood St Laurence, [2022.]Online Access: Ticket to Work Website Notes: Ticket to Work works to improve employment opportunities and outcomes for young people with disability. The initiative grew out of research that showed participation in work and career experience during secondary school are key indicators of post-school success for young people with disability. Work is a fundamental part of adult life. It gives us a sense of purpose and a feeling of worth; shaping who we are and how we fit into our community. Because work is so essential, students with disability must not be deprived the opportunity to explore employment pathways in their transition to adulthood. Ticket to Work does not provide direct services to young people with disability or their families. We encourage people to use our website to learn more about evidence based practice in school to work transition. Ticket to Work has a podcast series that explores the 'world of work' for young people with disability. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Ticket to Work submission to the New Disability Employment Support Model : focus on young people with disability / Ticket to Work

by Ticket to Work.

Publisher: [Fitzroy,Vic] : [Ticket to Work,] 2022Description: 25 p. PDF.Other title: New Disability Employment Support Model.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Ticket to Work aims to improve open employment participation in Australia by working collaboratively, advocating for systemic change, and providing an architecture for optimal employment and career achievement for young people with disability . We would welcome the opportunity to put in a submission and happy to provide further information regarding our submission and to work with the DSS to ensure young people with disability are able to successfully transition into decent employment. www.Tickettowork.org.au This submission provides a background to the current situation that young people with disability find themselves in. It also provides guidance on the way forward,drawing on our Ticket to Work experience and other relevant research. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Pathways, engagement and transitions : initial post-school transitions among young people experiencing disadvantage / The Smith Family

by The Smith Family.

Publisher: Sydney, NSW : Smith Family, 2022Description: 23 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: Young Australians experiencing disadvantage are particularly at risk of poorer educational and employment outcomes, and this is exacerbated by economic uncertainty. This has long-term impacts on many aspects of their lives, including income, housing, health and wellbeing, family formation and community connectedness. The Pathways, Engagement and Transitions (PET) study focuses on the experiences of young people experiencing disadvantage. It aims to understand their pathways through work and study over time, the factors that influence these pathways, and what more could be done to strengthen young people’s post-school outcomes. A particular strength of the PET study is that it is hearing directly from young people on these matters. Over three years (2021–2023), PET is following two cohorts of young people experiencing disadvantage. These young people were in Year 10 or Year 12 in late 2020 and on The Smith Family’s long term educational scholarship program, Learning for Life. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Education First Youth Foyer : Certificate 1 in Developing Independence Toolkit : trainers' manual and learning plan /

by Buick, Jo | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre | Hanover Welfare Services.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2014; South Melbourne, Vic. Hanover Welfare Services 2014Description: iv, 51 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Certificate 1 in Developing Independence Toolkit : trainers' manual and learning plan /.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: June 2014 Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing) Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/ Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
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Education First Youth Foyer : Employment Offer Conceptual Framework

by Cull, Emma | Brotherhood of St Laurence Social Policy and Research Department | Mallett, Shelley | James, Sally.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic Brotherhood of St Laurence 2014; South Melbourne, Vic. Hanover Welfare Services 2014Description: iv, 67 p.,ill PDF.Other title: Employment Offer Conceptual Framework.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: December 2014 Hanover Welfare Services (now Launch Housing) Launch Housing is an independent Melbourne based community organisation formed from the merger of two of Victoria’s leading homelessness service providers, HomeGround Services and Hanover in July 2015 Link to History of Launch Housing https://www.launchhousing.org.au/about-us/our-history/ Summary: The EFY Foyer Employment Offer presents a new approach for service-connected young people that aims to increase their access to and participation in the labour market, and address structural and personal barriers to accessing employment. The Employment Offer recognises that enabling service-connected young people to build a pathway to employment requires the development of strong links with employers, education and training services, employment support services and community service organisations. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Coaching guide : youth transitions

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Buick Jo | Cull, Emma | Homles, Robert | McTiernan, Niamh.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2016Description: 48 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: First published in September 2016Summary: Coaching Guide – Youth Transitions has been designed to provide the background for the coaching approach that the BSL is using across its Youth Transitions programs with young people – in particular, the Australian Government’s Transition to Work (TTW) Initiative and the Education First Youth (EFY) Foyers. The Guide steps out both our coaching model and some useful resources to implement this approach. It also underpins the development of our coaching practice and should be used in conjunction with tailored training. Coaching is just one of the practice modalities that the Youth Transitions teams use and it is important that the coaching practice is situated within the broader programmatic response. This guide is intended to be co-designed with the staff responsible for operationalising our Youth Transitions programs. As such, the BSL sees it as a foundational version and we will be encouraging ongoing feedback from users. The BSL Youth Transitions team and partner agencies will also undertake to co-design the next iteration of the Guide. Availability: (1)

Linking qualifications and the labour market through capabilities and vocational streams / by Leesa Wheelahan, John Buchanan, Serena Yu.

by Wheelahan, Leesa | Buchanan, John | Yu, Serena | National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, SA : National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2015Description: 48 p. : PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Synthesis report Summary: This report synthesises the findings from the three-year program of research - Vocations: the link between post-compulsory education and the labour market. The authors explore how building better links between education and work can help provide a more coherent approach to vocational development. They propose the use of vocational streams and productive capabilities in the education system and labour market to achieve this. The authors also highlight a number of short-, medium- and long-term policy objectives.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

School-to-work pathways / Rasika Ranasinghe ... [et al.].

by National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Ranasinghe, Rasika | Chew, Emerick | Knight, Genevieve | Siekmann, Gitta.

Publisher: Adelaide, S. Aust. : National Centre for Vocational Education Research, 2019Description: 56 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Authors: Rasika Ranasinghe, Emerick Chew, Genevieve Knight, Gitta Siekmann.Summary: This study explores young people's transition from school to work and identifies common transition pathways. It follows 3,186 young people over ten years, from age 16 in 2006 to age 25 in 2016, using data from the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY). The study found that though the majority of the young people followed relatively straightforward pathways of higher-education-to-work or early entry to full-time work, a quarter of the young people experienced varied and complex transitions including frequent switching between university and vocational education, episodes of part-time work, and repeatedly disengaging from the labour market. Five pathways were identified, influenced by whether the young person studied a vocational subject at school, individual school achievement, and socioeconomic issues - with studying a vocational subject at school shown to be a significant positive factor in all non-academic pathways. An interactive data visualisation of the pathways has also been published.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) analysis: literature review / Cameron Forrest, Charlotte Scobie, Kate Dowling and Sheila Hum (NCVER)

by Forrest, Cameron | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Scobie, Charlotte | Dowling, Kate et al.

Publisher: Carlton South, Victoria : Education Council, 2020Description: 42 p. (literature review) + 11 p. (supplementary report) + 35 p. (full reference list) PDF.Online Access: Literature review | Supplementary report | Reference list | Website Summary: The [Council of Australian Governments] COAG Education Council commissioned a review of senior secondary pathways into work, further education and training to examine how senior secondary students can better understand and be enabled to choose the most appropriate pathway to support their transition into work, further education and/or training. The review is centred around five key areas for consideration: (1) explore the efficacy of senior secondary education in preparing young people for diverse pathways to further learning and work; (2) investigate whether current certification and university entry requirements, including other credentials such as the International Baccalaureate, assist in allowing students to make the study choices that are right for them to develop the skills and knowledge they need to access the most appropriate pathway into work, further education and/or training; (3) investigate barriers to students being able to equitably access all pathways, particularly for students in rural, regional and remote areas, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, students with disability, those who struggle to make transitions to work, further education and training, and potential early school leavers; (4) identify best practice in flexible delivery options, transition and engagement support arrangements for students transitioning from Year 10 to Year 11, as well as from Year 12 to post-school destinations; and (5) investigate what, when and how data should be collected to capture experiences, identify pathways and measure the impact of delivery options, subject choice (including academic and VET) on student outcomes and destinations, to ensure continuous improvement. As part of the review, the Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment has asked the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) to undertake a literature review of existing Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) research to provide insights of relevance to the Terms of Reference, as well as identifying key messages and themes for consideration. The LSAY are a series of nationally representative surveys of young people that follow their transitions from compulsory schooling to post-school education and employment. The literature review has also examined other 'grey literature' covering the same timeframe, including reports, working papers, government documents, white papers and evaluations. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

STEM pathways : the impact of equity, motivation and prior achievement / Julie McMillan ; Sheldon Rothman ; Sarah Buckley et al. (Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)

by McMillan, Julie | Australian Council for Educational Research | Rothman, Sheldon | Buckley, Sarah et al | Curtin University. National Centre for Student Equality in Higher Education.

Bentley WA : Curtin Univesity. National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education 2021Description: v, 44 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) skills are promoted by the Australian Government as pivotal for Australia’s economic prosperity and meeting future workforce requirements (Timms et al., 2018). Whether particular equity groups are able to participate in STEM has implications for the future labour market outcomes of these groups and their contributions in an area seen as vitally important for innovation and prosperity. This study, developed with the support of a National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education (NCSEHE) Research Grant, is framed around three core research questions: 1. How do the STEM pathways of equity groups and non-equity groups differ? ; 2. What factors facilitate equity group students participating in university STEM courses? ; 3. Do the factors influencing young people’s university STEM participation differ between equity groups and non-equity groups? The study uses data tracking a cohort of young people from age 15 to 25 to explore these core questions. This data is drawn from the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) and from the Programme of International Student Assessment (PISA). The study offers new insights into STEM pathways for young people in equity groups as they progress from secondary school, through post-school education and into the workforce. The equity groups of focus in this study are people from Low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds, Nonmetropolitan areas, First in Family to enrol at university and Women in Non-Traditional Areas (WINTA) Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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