Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Families, incomes and jobs, volume 7 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 9 of the Household, income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey /

by Wilkins, Roger | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2011Description: viii, 177 p. : ill.Other title: Seventh Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Every year, the HILDA Survey collects information on a variety of aspects of family life. These aspects comprise family and household structures; how parents cope with parenting responsibilities, including the care arrangements they use and the care-related problems they face; issues of work-family balance; perceptions of family relationships; and perceptions of and attitudes to roles of household members. Periodically, information is also obtained on other aspects of family life, such as fertility plans, relationships with parents, siblings, non-resident children, grandchildren and non-resident partners, marital relationship quality and use of domestic help. Volume 6 is based on the first eight waves of data collected by the HILDA Survey and comprises two parts. Part A contains short articles that provide an annual update of changes in key aspects of life in Australia, covering the four main areas of HILDA, namely: Households and family life; Incomes and economic wellbeing; Labour market outcomes; and Life satisfaction, health and wellbeing. The second part of the report, Part B, contains articles on irregular topics, to a significant extent influenced by wave-specific question included in the survey.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 8 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 10 of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey /

by Wilkins, Roger (ed.) | Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2013Description: viii, 114 p.Other title: Eigth Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 9 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 11 of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey /

by Wilkins, Roger (ed.) | Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2014Description: PDF.Other title: Ninth Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Family diversity and well-being. /

by Acock, Alan C | Demo, David H.

Publisher: Thousand Oaks, CA Sage Publications 1994Description: 299 p. : ill.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Family social network : development of a Children's Headline Indicator : information paper /

by Crawford, Heather | Australian Institute of Health and Welfare | Eldridge, Deanna.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2010 Cat. no. PHE 131 Bibliography : p. 43-46Summary: A strong family social network provides access to support and resources, and is linked to better outcomes for children's health, development and wellbeing. This report describes the process of developing a Children's Headline Indicator designed to measure the quality of families' social interactions. It presents research evidence on the importance of the quality of family social networks for children's outcomes, assesses potential indicators and data sources, and recommends an indicator based on the ability of a family to get help when needed.Availability: (1)

Family wellbeing: proceedings of a workshop. Melbourne, 3 June 1987. /

by Tait, David (ed.).

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 1988Description: 160p.Notes: Includes paper by Jan Carter - Planning for social justice, p.126-134.Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).

Feeling good : supporting resilience in young people in Foyers in England /

by Carlin, Eric | The Foyer Federation.

Publisher: London, U.K. The Foyer Federation 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010 Bibliography : pp. 18-19Summary: The report Feeling Good: Supporting resilience in young people in Foyers in England, summarises the findings on a research project on resilience, in particular the factors that build resilience in young people, and the impact that this would have on the Foyer as a physical environment. The qualitative research project was conducted in five Foyers across England and the focus was to find out from Foyer residents what they believe would contribute to helping them develop and maintain resilience in the face of adversity and to make recommendations so that Foyers can reference their practice against the evidence base from academic literature and the views and perceptions of residents. The report includes a summary of recommendations which will help Foyers and the Foyer Federation reference their service provision and practice to the literature and young people's assessments of important resilience-encouraging components. The findings will be of interest to all agencies which provide services for young people. (The Foyer Federation summary)Availability: (1)

Female SAAP clients and children escaping domestic and family violence 2003-04 . /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2005Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/aus/bulletin30/bulletin30.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:27:05 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Figuring out the framework : a visual response to the Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework /

by Grinter, Catherine | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Leonard, Lea-Ann.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2010Description: 26 p. : ill.Other title: Family day care framework.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: The Brotherhood of St Laurence would like to thank Family Day Care field workers Catherine Grinter and Lea-Ann Leonard for the development of this document, with contributions from Eileen Buckley, Kim Ferguson, Terri Heard, Linley Kensitt, Daniel Leach and Elizabeth Orr. Bibliography : p. 26 Printed copies of this publication are available from BSL Community Services. A new edition is expected to be released by 2011.Summary: This resource aims to assist early childhood professionals to implement the new Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework and the ; National Childcare Accreditation Council (NCAC) Quality Practices Guide. The release of the Victorian Government?s Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework is an exciting development in the early childhood field. However, this document, alongside other state-based regulations and NCAC quality assurance requirements, can be quite daunting and difficult to understand. This is especially the case for early childhood professionals with English as a second language. Through accessible language and images, this resource demonstrates how many of the core professional practices of Family Day Care carers meet the requirements of both the Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework and the NCAC Family Day ; Care Quality Assurance Quality Practices Guide.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (7), BSL Archives (1).

Financial capability, income and psychological wellbeing /

by Taylor, Mark | University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic esearch | Jenkins, Stephen | Sacker, Amanda.

Publisher: Essex, U.K. University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research. 2011Description: PDF.Other title: ISER working paper series ; no. 2011-18.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2011 Bibliography pp. 25-28Summary: We examine whether financial capability has impacts on psychological health independent of income and financial resources more generally using a nationally representative survey. British Household Panel Survey data are used to construct a measure of financial capability, which we relate to respondents psychological health using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. We find that financial capability has significant and substantial effects on psychological health over and above those associated with income and material wellbeing more generally. The sizes of these impacts are considerably larger than those associated with changes in household income. Furthermore having low financial capability exacerbates the psychological costs associated with unemployment and divorce.Availability: (1)

Flashpoints & [and] signposts : pathways to success and wellbeing for Australia s young people. /

by Eckersley, Richard | Wierenga, Ani | Wyn, Johanna.

Publisher: Weston, A.C.T. Australia 21 2006Description: PDF.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Flourish : a visionary new understanding of happiness and well-being

by Seligman, Martin E. P.

Edition: 1st Atria paperback ed.Publisher: New York, NY Atria 2013Description: xii, 349 p. : ill.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index.Summary: Explains the four pillars of well-being--meaning and purpose, positive emotions, relationships, and accomplishment--placing emphasis on meaning and purpose as the most important for achieving a life of fulfillment. ; Contents: A new positive psychology. What is well-being? ; Creating your happiness : positive psychology exercises that work ; The dirty little secret of drugs and therapy ; Teaching well-being : the magic of MAPP ; Positive education : teaching well-being to young people -- The ways to flourish. GRIT, character, and achievement : a new theory of intelligence ; Army strong : comprehensive soldier fitness ; Turning trauma into growth ; Positive physical health : the biology of optimism ; The politics and economics of well-being -- Appendix. Signature strengths test.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Foodstuff : living in an age of feast and famine. /

by Holden, John (ed.) | Howland, Lydia (ed.) | Jones, Daniel Stedman (ed.).

Publisher: London, U.K. DEMOS 2002Description: 156 p. : ill.Notes: Website : http://www.demos.co.ukAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Footprints in Time - The Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC)' [Website]

by Australia. Department of Social Services.

Online Access: Website | DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Footprints in Time Key Summary Report from Wave 1 ; Wave 2 ; Wave 3 ; Wave 4 ; Wave 5Summary: Footprints in Time is the name given to the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC), an initiative of the Australian Government. Footprints in Time is conducted by the Department of Social Services (DSS) under the guidance of the Footprints in Time Steering Committee, chaired by Professor Mick Dodson AM. LSIC is one of a suite of longitudinal studies within the National Centre for Longitudinal Data (NCLD) in DSS. The study includes two groups of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children who were aged 6 to 18 months (B cohort) and 3½ - 5 years (K cohort) when the study began in 2008. In wave 1, over 1,680 interviews were conducted with the children’s parents or primary carers (usually the mothers) and over 265 interviews were conducted with fathers or other significant carers. Subsequent waves experienced strong support from these initial interviewees. To date, Footprints in Time interviewers have successfully contacted and interviewed over 1,200 of these original families in each subsequent wave. Additional families were introduced within our wave 2 interviews and have shown a similarly strong commitment to Footprints in Time. Interviews are primarily conducted by Department of Social Services Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research Administration Officers (RAOs). Interviews may also be conducted by other National Office Indigenous and non-Indigenous staff when required. Availability: (2)

For kids' sake : repairing the social environment for Australian children and young people /

by Parkinson, Patrick | University of Sydney. Faculty of Law.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. University of Sydney. Faculty of Law 2011Description: v, 117 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2011Summary: For very good reasons, Australians of all ages, backgrounds and political persuasions are concerned about the environment. What we do now in terms of looking after the environment will affect the nation not only in the present, but for generations to come. Rightly, we are thinking about what legacy we are going to leave our children, and their children, in terms of the natural world on which we all depend. However little attention has been paid to the social environment in which our children are growing up, and the dangers that the deterioration of this environment presents for the future. Indeed, many of us may not even be aware of how bad things are becoming. One of the reasons is that any report card on the wellbeing of the nation's children is likely to be mixed. Australia remains the Lucky Country in many respects. The wellbeing of Australian children has improved on a number of measures in the last decade or so, in particular in terms of physical and economic wellbeing. Yet overall levels of wellbeing, and even upward trends for the majority of the population, can disguise increasingly serious problems for many children. When the position of the nation's most troubled children and young people is considered, there are indications that all is not well, and that on numerous measures, the situation is deteriorating at an extraordinarily rapid pace. There has also been a decline, more generally, in the psychological wellbeing of young people. As a society, we may be healthier and wealthier than a generation ago, but contentment has proved much more elusive.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Frankston North Communities for Children : 2009-2012 /

by Wilks, Sarah | Anglicare Victoria. Social Policy and Research Unit | Wise, Sarah.

Publisher: Collingwood, Vic. Anglicare Victoria 2009Description: iv, 72 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 41-43Summary: This research aimed to develop a set of indicators and related measures for use in a whole-of-community outcomes evaluation of Frankston North CfC. The data intended to assist the planning and development of the CfC program 2009-2012 and to establish a baseline for the evaluation of community-level outcomes over the life of the programAvailability: (1)

Frankston North Communities for Children local evaluation : final report

by Mestan, Kemran | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Cameron, Nadine | Oke, Nicole | Stanley, Janet.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 55-59Summary: This evaluation of the local implementation of the national Communities for Children initiative in Frankston North on Melbourne's south-eastern fringe incorporated the Most Significant Change methodology. It examined the outcomes of activities ranging from playgroups to parenting support groups for children, families and the community from the perspective of parents and service providers.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

From measuring production to measuring wellbeing /

by Gruen, David | Australia. The Treasury.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Treasury 2010Description: 11 p.Other title: Measuring progress : from theory to practice.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Presentation by Dr. David Gruen to NatStats 2010Summary: A presentation by David Gruen in a Panel Discussion titled "Measuring Progress: From Theory to Practice" at NATSTATS 2010, Sydney, on 17 September 2010.Availability: (1)

Getting on : well-being in later life /

by McCormick, James | Clifton, Jonathan | Sachrajda, Alice | Cherti, Myriam | McDowell, Eleanor.

Publisher: Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: 60 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2009 Includes bibliographical references.Summary: We have known for some time that the population of the United Kingdom is getting older and that the number of people aged over 75 (sometimes referred to as the 'older old') is growing particularly quickly. Encouragingly, healthy life expectancy ; the number of years lived without illness or disability ; is improving on average. This report sets out a wider agenda for policymakers and practitioners. It reviews UK policies for older people and international practice, as well as the priorities of older people in urban versus rural locations. It concludes with recommendations for action, which signal a fresh approach to later life and seek to challenge outdated assumptions.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Good neighbours : measuring quality of life in older age /

by Watson, Jessica (ed.) | The International Longevity Centre UK | Sinclair, David (ed.).

Publisher: London, U.K. The International Longevity Centre 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2011 Bibliography : p. 13Summary: Increasing numbers of older people, higher expectations for 'a good life', and demands on health and social care services, have led to international interest in improving and measuring quality of life (QoL) in older age. Yet whilst QoL is a subjective concept, most attempts to measure it have been largely based on 'expert' opinions. As a result we may not have been measuring the right things when we review the QoL of older people. In addition, if the expert led measures of QoL don't measure the right things, policy makers may end up making the wrong policy interventions. Since 1999, research on QoL, which was funded by UK research councils, has allowed us to explore the potential for a new measure of QoL, based on the priorities of older people. Face-to-face interview surveys have explored older peoples' definitions of, and priorities for, QoL, and enabled the development of a measure of QoL based directly on their views.Availability: (1)

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