Brotherhood of St Laurence

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'This arbitrary rearrangement of riches' : an alternative theory of the costliness of inflation. /

by Coleman, William.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian National University. Centre for Economic Policy Research 2007Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://econrsss.anu.edu.au/pdf/DP553.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:47:14 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A comparative analysis of the nativity wealth gap . /

by Bauer, Thomas K | Institute for the Study of Labor | Cobb-Clark, Deborah A | Hildebrand, Vincent.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2007Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://ftp.iza.org/dp2772.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:40:48 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response Into & out of work Retirement & ageingSummary: international migration, wealth accumulationAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A Detailed Picture of Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital /

by Nichols, Austin | Favreault, Melissa.

Publisher: Washington DC The Urban Institute 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This 30-page US analysis looks at how parental education relates to education, lifetime earnings, health, and wealthAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A good time for making work pay? : Taking stock of in-work benefits and related measures across the OECD /

by Immervoll, Herwig | Pearson, Mark.

Publisher: Paris, France OECD Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs 2009Description: PDF.Summary: The twin problem of in-work poverty and persistent labour market difficulties of low-skilled individuals has been one of the most important drivers of tax-benefit policy reforms in OECD countries in recent years. Employment-conditional cash transfers to individuals facing particular labour-market challenges have been a core element of make-work-pay policies for some time and are now in use in more than half of the OECD countries. They are attractive because they redistribute to low-income groups while also creating additional work incentives. But like all social benefits, they have to be financed, which creates additional economic costs for some. This paper discusses the rationale for in-work benefits (IWB), summarises the main design features of programmes operated in OECD countries, and provides an update of what is known about their effectiveness in terms of reducing inequalities and creating employment. As policies aiming to promote self-sufficiency, wage subsidies and minimum wages share a number of the objectives associated with IWB measures. We review evidence on the effectiveness of minimum wages and wage subsidies and discuss links between these policies and IWBs. Finally, we outline some potential consequences of weakening labour markets for the effectiveness of make-work-pay policies.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A minimum income standard for Britain in 2009 /

by Hirsch, Donald | Davis, Abigail | Smith, Noel.

Publisher: York, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This study updates 2008 s innovative research, based on what members of the public thought people need for an acceptable minimum standard of living.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A wealth tax : a study of its economic aspects with special reference to Australia. /

by Fiedler, Mervyn R.G.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Australian Tax Research Foundation 1983Description: 94 p.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Address to the New Agenda for Prosperity conference : Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, Thursday 27 March 2008 /

by Nicholson, Tony | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2008Description: 6 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Our experience at the Brotherhood is that there are a large and growing number of people in our community who are increasingly uncomfortable that so many have been left behind like this, especially in times of plenty.Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).

Asset rich, but income poor : Australian housing wealth and retirement /

by Bradbury, Bruce | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2010Description: viii, 44 p. : ill.Other title: Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 43-44Summary: This paper examines patterns of housing wealth among the aged in Australia over time and compares Australian housing wealth patterns with those in North America and Western Europe, to determine if the Australian elderly hold particularly high levels of housing wealth, and if this leads to a relative overconsumption of housing. The paper uses data from the three most recent Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Household Expenditure Surveys (1993/94, 1998/99 and 2003/04).Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Assets for all : a review of the Australian Government's $77 billion support for asset-building

by Brody, Gerard | Brotherhood of St Laurence | McNess, Elizabeth.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2009Description: PDF, 14 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The authors of this report argue that Australia?s current asset-building policies largely support those who are already well off. Tax concessions on housing and superannuation in particular enable wealthier households to further accumulate assets while doing little for poorer families. Significant reform of the tax and transfer system is required so that policies to encourage asset building will benefit those who need support the most.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Australians attitudes towards wealth inequality and the minimum wage : a national survey of knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of wealth inequality and the minimum wage /

by Neal, David | Australian Council of Trade Unions | Govan, Cassandra | Norton, Mike | Ariely, Dan.

Publisher: Empirica Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 15 April 2011 Bibliography : p. 18 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: The wealthiest 20% of Australians own 61% of the country's wealth. The poorest 20% own 1%. The wealth gap is large and growing, but how well are these economic trends known by the Australian public at large? Does the 'illusion of equality' impact support for policies that would bring greater equality to Australian society? The economic realities of wealth inequality are well understood and robust quantitative analyses of the phenomenon are regularly conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics and by various researchers. What remains something of a mystery is how the Australian public views wealth inequality. Do they understand exactly how wealth is distributed across households in Australia? What degree of inequality do they regard as 'ideal'? Are their beliefs about wealth inequality - both what it is and what it should be - related to their beliefs about the major policy mechanisms governments can use to address wealth inequality (e.g., the minimum wage, progressive taxation)? The present research answers these questions.Availability: (1)

Baby boomers : doing it for themselves /

by Kelly, Simon | National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling | Harding, Ann.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM). University of Canberra 2007Description: PDF.Other title: AMP.NATSEM income and wealth report ; issue 16.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2007Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Be wealthy to stay healthy : an analysis of /

by Cai, Lixin | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Capital in the twenty-first century /

by Piketty, Thomas.

Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press. The Belknap Press 2014Description: viii.Notes: Goldhammer, Arthur, translatorSummary: What are the grand dynamics that drive the accumulation and distribution of capital? Questions about the long-term evolution of inequality, the concentration of wealth, and the prospects for economic growth lie at the heart of political economy. But satisfactory answers have been hard to find for lack of adequate data and clear guiding theories. In Capital in the Twenty-First Century, `Thomas Piketty analyzes a unique collection of data from twenty countries, ranging as far back as the eighteenth century, to uncover key economic and social patterns. His findings will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about wealth and inequality. Piketty shows that modern economic growth and the diffusion of knowledge have allowed us to avoid inequalities on the apocalyptic scale predicted by Karl Marx. But we have not modified the deep structures of capital and inequality as much as we thought in the optimistic decades following World War II. The main driver of inequality--the tendency of returns on capital to exceed the rate of economic growth--today threatens to generate extreme inequalities that stir discontent and undermine democratic values. But economic trends are not acts of God. Political action has curbed dangerous inequalities in the past, Piketty says, and may do so again. A work of extraordinary ambition, originality, and rigor, Capital in the Twenty-First Century `reorients our understanding of economic history and confronts us with sobering lessons for today.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
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Creating wealth : the new rules for individuals, companies and countries in a knowledge-based economy. /

by Thurow, Lester C.

Publisher: London, U.K. Nicholas Brealey 1999Description: xvi, 301 p.Notes: Includes index.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Discussion : Equity and efficiency : policy considerations. /

by Kakwani, Nanak.

Publisher: 1996Description: p. 98-106.Notes: Rec. no. for book :B7520 indexed chapterAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Distribution of the economic gains of the 1990s : staff research paper. /

by Parham, Dean | Australia. Productivity Commission | Barnes, Paula | Roberts, Paul | Kennett, Sharon.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Productivity Commission 2000Description: xxx,163 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2000 Includes bibliographical references (p. 157-163)Availability: (1)

Economic inequality : who gets what in Australia. /

by Stilwell, Frank.

Publisher: Leichhardt, N.S.W. Pluto Press 1993Description: 100 p. Includes index.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Economic Society of Australia, 34th Conference of Economists, 26-28 September 2005, University of Melbourne . /

by The Economic Society of Australia.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Economic Society of Australia 2005Description: HTML.Notes: URL: 'http://gemini.econ.umd.edu/conference/ACE2005/program/ACE2005.html' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:27:25 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response URL: 'http://www.conferences.unimelb.edu.au/ace2005/' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:27:26 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs : a statistical report of the HILDA survey : volume 1 /

by Headey, Bruce | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana | Harding, Glenys.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2006Description: 108 p.Other title: First Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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