Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Are youths on income support less happy ? : evidence from Australia. /

by Lee, Wang-Sheng | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Oguzoglu, Umut.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Contemporary Australian archetypes : different people, different needs. /

by Berry, Helen L | Butterworth, Peter | Caldwell, Tanya M.

Publisher: The Department 2008Description: x, 97 p.Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 85-97) FaHCSIA0339.08.2Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 2 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 4 of the HILDA survey /

by Headey, Bruce | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2007Description: vii, 133 p.Other title: Second Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 3 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 5 of the HILDA survey /

by Headey, Bruce | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2008Description: vi, 141 p. : ill.Other title: Third Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 4 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 6 of the HILDA survey /

by Wilkins, Roger | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana | Hahn, Markus.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2009Description: vii, 208 p. : ill.Other title: Fourth Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical references 17 Aug 2011 : Missing - needs call number change to 306.850994 FAMSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 5 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 7 of the Household, income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey /

by Wilkins, Roger | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana | Hahn, Markus | Houng, Brendan.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2010Description: vii, 167 p. : ill.Other title: Fifth Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: This is the fifth volume of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey Annual Statistical Report, and examines data from the first seven waves of the HILDA Survey, which were conducted between 2001 and 2007. As in Volume 4, the report contains two parts. Part A contains short articles providing an annual update on changes in key aspects of life in Australia that are measured by the HILDA Survey every year. Four broad and very much overlapping ?life domains? are covered: household and family life; incomes and economic wellbeing; labour market outcomes; and life satisfaction, health and wellbeing. The second part of the report, Part B, contains articles on irregular topics, to a significant extent influenced by wave-specific questions included in the survey. The HILDA Survey seeks to provide nationally representative longitudinal data on Australian residents describing the ways in which people's lives are changing. ; HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 6 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 8 of the Household, income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey /

by Wilkins, Roger | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana | Hahn, Markus | Houng, Brendan.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2011Description: viii, 183 p. : ill.Other title: Sixth Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Every year, the HILDA Survey collects information on a variety of aspects of family life. These aspects comprise family and household structures; how parents cope with parenting responsibilities, including the care arrangements they use and the care-related problems they face; issues of work?family balance; perceptions of family relationships; and perceptions of and attitudes to roles of household members. Periodically, information is also obtained on other aspects of family life, such as fertility plans, relationships with parents, siblings, non-resident children, grandchildren and non-resident partners, marital relationship quality and use of domestic help. Volume 6 is based on the first eight waves of data collected by the HILDA Survey and comprises two parts. Part A contains short articles that provide an annual update of changes in key aspects of life in Australia, covering the four main areas of HILDA, namely: Households and family life; Incomes and economic wellbeing; Labour market outcomes; and Life satisfaction, health and wellbeing. The second part of the report, Part B, contains articles on irregular topics, to a significant extent influenced by wave-specific question included in the survey. ; HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDAAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 7 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 9 of the Household, income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey /

by Wilkins, Roger | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2011Description: viii, 177 p. : ill.Other title: Seventh Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Every year, the HILDA Survey collects information on a variety of aspects of family life. These aspects comprise family and household structures; how parents cope with parenting responsibilities, including the care arrangements they use and the care-related problems they face; issues of work-family balance; perceptions of family relationships; and perceptions of and attitudes to roles of household members. Periodically, information is also obtained on other aspects of family life, such as fertility plans, relationships with parents, siblings, non-resident children, grandchildren and non-resident partners, marital relationship quality and use of domestic help. Volume 6 is based on the first eight waves of data collected by the HILDA Survey and comprises two parts. Part A contains short articles that provide an annual update of changes in key aspects of life in Australia, covering the four main areas of HILDA, namely: Households and family life; Incomes and economic wellbeing; Labour market outcomes; and Life satisfaction, health and wellbeing. The second part of the report, Part B, contains articles on irregular topics, to a significant extent influenced by wave-specific question included in the survey.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Jobless households in Australia : incidence, characteristics and financial consequences : final report submitted to the Commonwealth Department of Family and Community Services /

by Scutella, Rosanna | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Wooden, Mark.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2004Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2003 Revised March 2004 Bibliography : p. 52-54 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: An emerging trend in Australia during recent decades has been for employment to become increasingly polarised into households where either no adult is working (jobless households) or where all adults are working (all-work households) A major feature of this rise in the incidence of jobless households is that it does not mirror trends in unemployment and employment rates based on individual data. Most obviously, while the aggregate unemployment rate has been trending downwards since the recession of the early 1990s, the jobless household rate continued to rise, at least until 1996-97. These trends imply that a growing proportion of those not in work at any point in time are located in households with no earned income, which in turn must mean that a growing proportion of households are dependent on savings, transfers from other households or, more often, from the State for income.Availability: (1)

Long-term homelessness : understanding the challenge : 12 months outcomes from the Journey to Social Inclusion pilot program /

by Johnson, Guy | Sacred Heart Mission, St Kilda | Parkinson, Sharon | Tseng, Yi-Ping | Kuehnle, Daniel.

Publisher: St. Kilda, Vic. Sacred Heart Mission 2011Description: 45 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 27-30 Includes appendicesSummary: Journey to Social Inclusion (J2SI) is a pilot program designed to break the cycle of long-term homelessness. The program provides intensive support for up to three years to assist long-term homeless people receive the range of services they need. The J2SI model contrasts with existing services that tend to be short-term responses which do not address the underlying issues causing long-term homelessness. This is the first of four reports evaluating the J2SI program. It documents preliminary outcomes from the first 12 months of a randomised controlled trial evaluating J2SI?s effectiveness. The evaluation tracks the outcomes of J2SI participants over time. The randomised control trial approach then compares their outcomes with those of a comparison group who are being supported by existing services. The report reveals the extent of the problems faced by those who are amongst the most disadvantaged in our society. People who are long-term homeless almost always have traumatic childhoods (87%). Virtually all grew up in poverty, and experienced major and often repeated childhood trauma such as sexual or physical abuse, the involvement of child protection, or an experience of homelessness at a young age. Over 90% now have chronic ill health and drug and alcohol problems and over three quarters have been physically assaulted at some point in their lives. None have paid employment and most have not worked for five years or more.Availability: (1)

Social exclusion monitor bulletin, September 2011 /

by Horn, Michael | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Scutella, Roasanna | Wilkins, Roger.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic.Social exclusion monitor bulletin September 2011 2011Description: 9p. PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2011Summary: Understanding the level of social exclusion is a key step towards developing a more socially inclusive society. If Australia is to substantially improve community wellbeing and strengthen economic productivity, it is essential that we have a rigorous measure of the number of people experiencing exclusion as a benchmark to monitor social progress and the effectiveness of government policies. This bulletin is the first in a series of annual bulletins that will summarise the findings of our newly developed measure of social exclusion.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The efficacy of early childhood interventions /

by Wise, Sarah | da Silva, Lisa | Webster, Elizabeth | Sanson, Ann.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2005Description: x, 114 p.Online Access: Electronic copy | Link to AIFS website Notes: July 2005 Includes bibliographical references (p. 52-53) Contents: 1. Background and purpose of the project -- 2. Terminology and scope of the review -- 3. Classification of interventions -- 4. Adequacy of intervention design and implementation -- 5. Adequacy of evaluation design -- 6. Effects of early childhood interventions -- 7. Cost-benefit analysis: purposes and principles -- 8. Steps in a cost-benefit analysis -- 9. Overview of cost-benefit calculations: present value, rate of return and cost-effectiveness methodologies -- 10. Valuing spillovers and non-market transactions -- 11. Evaluations of cost-benefit studies of early childhood interventions -- 12. Lessons for Australia -- Appendix 1. Early childhood interventions identified via a search of the literature -- Appendix 2. Summary of evaluated early childhood interventions.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
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The role of non-traditional work in the Australian labour market /

by Australia. Productivity Commission.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Productivity Commission 2006Description: xxvi, 184 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2006 Includes bibliographical references (p. 177-184)Availability: (1)

The structure and distribution of household wealth in Australia : cohort differences and retirement issues. /

by Heady, Bruce | Warren, Diana | Wooden, Mark.

Publisher: The Department 2008Description: vi, 40 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 39-40) FaHCSIA0625.08.03Availability: (1)

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