Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Appliances and their impact : the ownership of domestic technology and time spent on household work. /

by Bittman, Michael | Rice, James Mahmud | Wajcman, Judy.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2003Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Economic analysis of families : existing research findings. /

by Johnson, David | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Kalb, Guyonne.

Publisher: [Parkville, Vic.] Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2002Description: 45 p.Summary: This paper presents a literature review of family economics, theories and selected studies of the issues relating to the family.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

On time technology implementation : how to achieve implementation success with limited time and resources. /

by Lientz, Bennet P | Rea, Kathryn P.

Publisher: San Diego, CA Academic Press 2000Description: xxi, 293 p.Notes: Includes index missing 2006Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Race against time : how Australians spend their time /

by Australian Mutual Provident Society.

Publisher: Sydney AMP 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2011 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Balancing work and family remains a big issue for Australian men and women, with around 40% of women and 30% of men feeling often or always rushed or pressed for time, according to the latest AMP.NATSEM Income and Wealth Report. But when it comes to how men and women spend their day, the report finds that there are some big differences, with traditional gender roles still evident. Contributing to time pressures, Australian full-time weekly work hours have increased by almost three hours for men and two hours for women since 1985. That is, average weekly full-time hours have risen from 39.5 to 42.3 hours for men and 36.4 hours to 38.6 hours for women. Australian women are spending on average two hours more each day than men on housework, child care and purchasing goods and services. Men spend almost the equivalent extra time on employment-related activities as well as an extra half hour per day on recreational and leisure pursuits.Availability: (1)

The seven habits of highly effective people : restoring the character ethic. /

by Covey, Stephen M. R.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Business Library 1990Description: 340 p.Notes: First published: New York : Simon and Schuster, 1989 2 copies copy 2 missing (August 2005)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The time pressure illusion : discretionary time versus free time. /

by Goodin, Robert | Rice, James Mahmud | Bittman, Michael | Saunders, Peter.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2002Description: 45 p.Notes: September 2002 Includes bibliographical references website : http://www.sprc.unsw.edu.auAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The timing of maternal work and time with children /

by Stewart, Jay | Institute for the Study of Labor.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: I use data from the American Time Use Survey to examine how maternal employment affects when during the day that mothers of pre-school-age children spend doing enriching childcare and whether they adjust their schedules to spend time with their children at more-desirable times of day. I find that employed mothers shift enriching childcare time from workdays to nonwork days. On workdays, full-time employed parents shift enriching childcare time toward evenings, but there is little shifting among part-time employed mothers. I find no evidence that full-time employed mothers adjust their schedules to spent time with their children at more-preferred times of day, whereas part-time employed mothers shift employment to later in the day.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Time and income poverty : an interdependent multidimensional poverty approach with German time use diary data /

by Merz, Joachim | Institute for the Study of Labor | Rathjen, Tim.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: IZA DP No. 4337Summary: Income as the traditional one dimensional measure in well-being and poverty analyses is extended in recent studies by a multidimensional poverty concept. Though this is certainly a progress, however, two important aspects are missing: time as an important dimension and the interdependence of the often only separately counted multiple poverty dimensions. Our paper will contribute to both aspects: First, we consider time ? and income ? both as striking and restricting resources of everyday activities and hence account for time and income as important multiple poverty dimensions. Second, the interdependence of the poverty dimensions will be evaluated by the German population to allow an advanced approach to understand possible substitution effects and the respective trade offs between the dimensions. Referring to the time dimension, we follow Sen's capability approach with its freedom of the living conditions' choice and social exclusion and argue, that restricted time might ex! clude from social participation. In particular, restricted genuine, personal leisure time (not entire leisure time) in particular is associated with a restricted social participation. The crucial question then is how to measure the substitution between income and such genuine leisure time. In our analysis we consider the country population?s valuation with data from the German Socio-Economic Panel and estimate the substitution by a CES-utility function of general utility/satisfaction. Given this quantification we disentangle time, income and interdependent multidimensional poverty regimes characterising the working poor. In addition, we quantify further socio-economic influences for each interdependent multidimensional poverty regime by a multinomial logit based on time use diary data of the German Time Use Study 2001/02. One striking result for Germany: the substitution between time and income is significant and we find an important fraction of time poor who are unable to ! substitute their time deficit by income. These poor people are ignored within the poverty and well-being as well as the time crunch and time famine discussion so far.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Time and income poverty . /

by Burchardt, Tania.

Publisher: London, U.K. London School of Economics 2008Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

You and stress : a guide to successful living /

by Montgomery, Bob | Evans, Lynette.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Nelson Publishers 1984Description: 248p.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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