Brotherhood of St Laurence

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A spatial divide : trends in the incomes and socioeconomic characteristics of regions between 1996 and 2001. /

by Lloyd, Rachel | Yap, Mandy | Harding, Ann.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T.Paper presented to the 28th Australian and New Zealand Regional Science Association International Annual Conference, Wollongong 28 September - 1 October 2004. 2004Description: iv, 18 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 18)Availability: (1)

Advance Australia fair? : trends in small area socio-economic inequality, 2001 to 2006 /

by Ngu Vv, Quoc | National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling | Harding, Ann | Tanton, Rob | Nepal, Binod | Vidyattana, Yogi.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM). University of Canberra 2008Description: PDF.Other title: AMP.NATSEM income and wealth report ; issue 20.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2008Summary: "The 20th AMP.NATSEM Income and Wealth Report, Advance ; Australia Fair?, takes a critical look at trends in income, ; unemployment, immigration and other socio-economic factors ; for different geographic regions of Australia, rather than ; individual Australians - drawing on Census data from 2001 and ; 2006." -- Publisher websiteAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Ageing and the use of the internet : current engagement and future needs /

by Milligan, Christine | Nominet Trust | Passey, Don.

Publisher: Oxford, U.K. Nominet Trust 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2011 Bibliography pp. 82-89Summary: Over the past five years the number of people online, aged 65 and over, has remained relatively static, with between 25% and 35% using the internet (Oxford Internet Institute Survey 2011). As new online services become available and more benefits of being digitally connected are highlighted, this figure presents a real challenge to those working with this demographic group as there seems to be little impact aggregated to a national scale. Yet the over-65 population describes a diverse group. There can be up to 40 years life experience between those in early old age and those in late old age; it can describe people in good health and poor health; those who are physically or socially isolated or those living with, or supported by families. As such, a diverse range of approaches need to be put in place if we are to support them to benefit from using the internet. Similarly, when the online/offline figure is broken down into smaller age groups or correlated with other socio-economic characteristics (such as housing status, educational attainment, income levels etc) a clearer picture of internet use and the mechanisms of support for novice and advanced users becomes apparent. This publication sets out the latest research into how the internet is, and can be, used to support those over 65 as well as highlighting the mechanisms, themes and social situations that best enable this group to benefit from the internet. By doing so, it sets out a number of ways in which we can look to develop new approaches to supporting people over the age of 65 to get online in a sustained and meaningful way.Availability: (1)

All things being equal? Equality and diversity in careers education, information, advice and guidance /

by Hutchinson, Jo | University of Derby | Rolfe, Heather | Moore, Nicki.

Publisher: Manchester, U.K. Equality and Human Rights Commission 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Equality and Human Rights Commission Research report ; no. 71.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 119-130 Appendices pp. 131-151 INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: In its education chapter, the Commission's first Triennial Review of evidence on inequality, How Fair is Britain's Equality, Human Rights and Good Relations in 2010, found that educational attainment has been transformed in recent years. Around half of young people are now getting good qualifications at 16 (5+ A-C GCSEs or equivalent including English and Maths) and, in 2008/09, 2.4 million students enrolled in higher education in the UK - a considerable change from a time when educational opportunities were only available to a minority of young people. However, the evidence shows that educational attainment continues to be strongly associated with socio-economic background. Stereotypical information and guidance can limit young people's options and aspirations at an early age. Careers advice often reinforces traditional choices and young people have limited information on the pay advantages of nontraditional routes. Nearly one in four young people say that they have not had enough information to make choices for their future. This rises to just under a quarter of disabled young people.Availability: (1)

An age perspective on economic well-being and social protection in nine OECD countries . /

by Dang, Thai-Thanh | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development | Immervoll, Herwig | Mantovani, Daniela.

Publisher: Paris, France Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/5/10/36890154.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:27:18 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Applied learning after class /

by Pardy, John | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Other title: The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 11-12 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: By foregrounding teachers, practices in the Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) this paper illustrates how social class can be deployed to critically explain inequalities and differences in schooling. Applied learning is represented as a practical and 'un-academic' schooling option for the 'difficult to teach', and has similarities with earlier institutional forms of working class schooling as provided in Technical Schools. Schooling through VCAL prepares students differently than general schooling by instigating a new subjective and cultural shift in schooling. ; VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING (VCAL)Availability: (1)

Approaches to personal money management : a population segmentation based on data from the ANZ Survey of Adult Financial Literacy in Australia (2008) /

by Social Research Centre and Data Analysis Australia | Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2011Description: x, 57 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.Other title: Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 57Summary: This report presents findings from a segmentation analysis that used data from the 2008 ANZ Survey of Adult Financial Literacy in Australia. The project profiles the population into segments based on personal money management attitudes and behaviours. The findings are designed to help policy makers better understand how money is managed in Australia, to inform the development of new approaches to assist people in financial difficulty and to prevent people getting into such situations in the first place.Availability: (1)

Assessing Poverty and Well-being in Australia : Potential of the Capability Paradigm /

by Jetti, Archana Preeti | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography p. 9-11Summary: Poverty and human well-being studies in Australia have been led by socioeconomic statistics which are limited in their description of the problem. There is a growing call for alternate ways, to conceptualise and evaluate poverty and well-being, which assist the government to develop broader and more inclusive poverty alleviation policies that can target more than what these statistics are able to capture. This paper argues for a broader informational space which is not dominant in Australian approaches to conceptualise, measure and evaluate poverty and well-being. The Capability Approach brings capabilities and functionings into the informational space, highlighting issues of equality as well as diversity, making it useful for normative evaluations of poverty and well-being especially in an affluent country like Australia.Availability: (1)

Assessing the evidence on Indigenous socioeconomic outcomes : a focus on the 2002 NATSISS. /

by Hunter, B.H. (ed.).

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, Australian National University 2006Description: xxi, 349 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index. Summary: This publication (commended by Jon Altman at a recent seminar at the BSL) presents the refereed and peer-reviewed, edited proceedings of a 2005 conference aimed at presenting the latest evidence on Indigenous economic and social status and family and community life and considering policy implications. Presenters evaluated the strengths and weaknesses of the methodology employed in the 2002 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey (NATSISS) and the data collected.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Better indigenous policies : the role of evaluation /

by Australia. Productivity Commission.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australia. Productivity Commission 2013Description: vi,273 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Roundtable proceedings Canberra, 22-23 October 2012 Contents: 1. Introduction - why this roundtable? / Gary Banks -- 2. Outcomes for indigenous Australians - the current situation / Robert Fitzgerald -- 3. The indigenous policy experience 1960 to 2012 / Fred Chaney -- 4. Challenges in evaluating indigenous policy / Les Malezer -- 5. The case for making public policy evaluations public / Deborah A. Cobb-Clark -- 6. Holding government to account / Jody Broun -- 7. Designing evaluation strategies / Matthew James -- 8. Data for better indigenous policy evaluation : achievements, constraints and opportunities / John Taylor -- 9. Evaluating indigenous programs and policies : communicating the outcomes / David Kalisch and Fadwa Al-Yaman -- 10. Better indigenous policies : an Aotearoa New Zealand perspective on the role of evaluation / Helen Moewaka Barnes -- 11. Is evaluation a tool for social justice? reconciliation? control? - reflections on the Canadian experience in indigenous affairs / Francis Abele -- 12. The use of evaluation in indigenous policy and program development : the case of Stronger Futures in the Northern Territory / Michael Dillion -- Learning from experience? getting governments to listen to what evaluations are telling them / Prue Phillips-Brown, Tim Reddel and Brian Gleeson.Summary: The Commission held a roundtable on Better Indigenous Policies: The Role of Evaluation at Old Parliament House in Canberra on 22-23 October 2012. This publication of the proceedings was released on 30 April 2013.The roundtable considered both the particular challenges in Indigenous policy evaluation and the actions needed to ensure that evidence gained from evaluations can be embedded in policy-making and program implementation.Availability: (1)

Boy troubles : understanding rising suicide, rising crime and educational failure. /

by Buckingham, Jennifer.

Publisher: St. Leonards, N.S.W. Centre for Independent Studies 2000Description: xiii, 101 p. : ill.Notes: June 2000 Includes bibliographical references and index.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Bridges out of poverty : strategies for professionals and communities. /

by Payne, Ruby K | DeVol, Philip | Dreussi Smith, Terie.

Edition: Rev. ed.Publisher: Highlands, TX aha! Process 2005Description: 267 p.Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 261-267)Summary: Designed for social, health and legal professionals in the United States, this book aims to help such workers understand the hidden rules which shape many aspects of the lives of people in poverty. The authors argue that staff with middle-class backgrounds are largely unaware that their clients belong to a quite different culture, and therefore often overlook the challenges faced and the strengths demonstrated by people living in survival mode . They suggest strategies for achieving better communication, negotiation and understanding - accompanied by exercises and summaries.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Childhood economic resources, academic performance, and the choice to leave school at age sixteen. /

by Maani, Sholeh A | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research | Kalb, Guyonne.

Publisher: [Parkville, Vic.] Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2003Description: 28 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)

Climate change, justice and vulnerability /

by Lindley, Sarah | Joseph Rowntree Foundation | O'Neill, John | Kandeh, Joseph.

Publisher: York, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2011 Bibliography pp. 113-119 Appendices pp. 120-176Summary: Climate change will increase the intensity and frequency of extreme weather events such as floods and heatwaves in the UK. This project is concerned with justice in the distribution of the effects of these events on well-being. The effects of extreme weather events will not be distributed evenly. How badly a person or group will be affected will depend not just on their exposure to the event, but on their vulnerability - that is, how well they are able to cope with and respond to floods and heatwaves. Vulnerability is a matter of how events convert into losses in well-being.Availability: (1)

Cultural Chameleons : an investigation into the construction and influences of working-class identities on the formal learning of white, baby-boomer males /

by Lovett, Trevor | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 9-11Summary: This paper outlines the findings of a qualitative, narrative, retrospective investigation into white, working-class, baby-boomer males? perceptions of their own formal educational experiences. The study while accepting the significance of the socio-economic/class correlation also identified important non-material influences of class on the participants? formal learning. The investigation revealed how discursively marginalized social identities negotiated their relationship with formal learning environments. Social persistence or continuity was considered problematic because many effects normally associated with a stratified social structure were not obvious in the research data. The study showed that the participants' educational potential was affected more by the dynamics of personal interaction than broad socially constructed differences. It was found that the educational and social opportunities of the participant sample tended to be a consequence of the respect individual actors showed for each other both within and outside the context of the school.Availability: (1)

Darebin poverty inquiry : final report : May 2001 /

by City of Darebin. Community Planning and Advocacy Branch.

Publisher: [Preston, Vic.] City of Darebin 2001Description: 101 p.Notes: See also: Darebin poverty inquiry : volume two : appendices [B11309] Includes bibliographical referencesAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Darebin poverty inquiry : volume two : appendices. /

by City of Darebin. Community Planning and Advocacy Branch.

Publisher: [Preston, Vic.] City of Darebin 2001Description: 1 v.Notes: See also: Darebin poverty inquiry : final report [B11310]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Developing dialogues : strategies for the Brotherhood of St Laurence for communicating about poverty in Australia /

by Jope, Sally | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2002Description: iii, 31 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2002 Includes bibliographical references (p. 31)Summary: This reports the findings of the second stage of the Understanding Poverty project. It identifies important communications strategies for engaging with the general community and with government and policymakers. It highlights the role of personal stories and appropriate indicators in unpacking the complexity of poverty, and the value of partnerships in mobilising community action.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

Dimensions of Australian society. /

by Graetz, Brian | McAllister, Ian.

Edition: 2nd ed.Publisher: South Melbourne Macmillan Education 1994Description: xviii, 427 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.Notes: Includes index. Previous ed.: South Melbourne : Macmillan, 1988.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Disadvantaged children's 'low' educational expectations : are the US and UK really so different to other industrialized nations? /

by Jerrim, John | University of London. Institute of Education. Department of uantitative Social Science.

Publisher: London, U.K. University of London. Institute of Education. 2011Description: PDF.Other title: University of London. Institute of Education. Department of.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011 Bibliography pp. 32-34 Appendices pp. 44-52 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: In most countries, children from disadvantaged backgrounds are under-represented amongst the undergraduate population. One explanation is that they do not see higher education as a realistic goal; that it is 'not for the likes of them'. In this paper, I use the Programme for International Assessment data to investigate whether 15 year olds from disadvantaged backgrounds are less likely to expect to complete university than their advantaged peers. I explore this issue across the OECD nations, though paying particular attention to the US and UK. My results suggest that children from less fortunate families are not as likely to make early plans for university as their affluent peers. Yet the extent to which these findings differ across countries is rather modest, with little evidence to suggest that the UK stands out from other members of the OECD. The US, on the other hand, appears to be a nation where the relationship between socio-economic background and the expectation of completing higher education is comparatively weak.Availability: (1)

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