Brotherhood of St Laurence

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A feasibility study of a new initiative in social welfare in Queensland /

by Reilly, Lin | Queensland Steering Committee.

Publisher: [Brisbane] The Committee 1979Description: 41 p. + appendices.Notes: August 1979 The study was funded by the Brotherhood of St LaurenceAvailability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

Addressing disadvantage : Consideration of models and approaches to measuring social impact /

by Zappal , Gianni | Centre for Social Impact | Lyons, Mark.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Centre for Social Impact 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2009Summary: The context and background of the measurement of social impact across the business, government and nonprofit sectors is described in this report. Underlying assumptions and related management techniques are then scanned. The companions and predecessors to social impact measurement are briefly outlined. Three frameworks and methods are gaining traction in Australian discussion and practice around social impact measurement in the Third Sector. They are: Social Accounting and Audit (SAA), Logic Models and Social Return on Investment (SROI). The key policy issues around these three social impact measurement approaches as well as the key similarities and differences across them are outlined. The more descriptive and technical aspects of the methodologies are included in the Appendix.Availability: (1)

Addressing locational disadvantage effectively /

by Ware, Vicki-Ann | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute. Research ynthesis Service | Gronda , Hellene | Vitis, Laura.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Commissioned by Housing New South Wales August 2010 Appendices : p. 51-100 Bibliography : p. 101-103Summary: This report is the final output of a synthesis examining the nature of locational disadvantage and ways in which governments can intervene to improve the lives of disadvantaged residents in areas of concentrated poverty and disadvantage. The report outlines the synthesis methodology used, then explores the complex and contested concept of locational disadvantage. This is followed by discussion of some interventions used in the US, UK and EU to improve the life chances of residents of disadvantaged areas, leading to conclusions about broad principles for achieving lasting improvements.Availability: (1)
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Addressing social disadvantage through volunteering /

by Haski-Leventhal, Debbie | Centre for Social Impact.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Centre for Social Impact 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2009Summary: In this paper we review the current state of volunteering in Australia, particularly volunteering by socially disadvantaged groups. After presenting the advantages and challenges involved with volunteering, the relation of volunteering to socially disadvantaged groups is discussed: as the recipients of voluntary services and as providers. Two innovative concepts are presented to suggest how the Government can help to enhance both in a way that will facilitate social inclusion: volunteerability (the ability of individuals to volunteer) and recruitability (the ability of organisations to recruit volunteers). By presenting many examples from the Western World, various options by which the Government can enhance both are discussed.Availability: (1)

Background issues to addressing disadvantage in social investment /

by Corcoran, Janette | Centre for Social Impact | Charlton, Kylie.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Centre for Social Impact 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2009 Bibliography : p. 26Summary: The aim of this paper is to consider the role of social investment in addressing social disadvantage. In view of the state of play in Australia regarding appreciation of its 'third sector' and so social investment, it is suggested that a concise yet broad-brush approach to this topic be undertaken with the expectation that ensuing conversations will expand upon specific areas of interest.Availability: (1)

Brotherhood : stories of courage and resilience : workbook /

by Brereton, Elida | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Burke, Peter | Chapman, Brad | Daughtry, Stephen | Hewlett, Bev | Hunter, Carmel | Miller, Jamie.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: iv, 56 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: "Photography by Peter McConchie".Summary: This workbook is a companion for the book, Brotherhood: Stories of Courage and Resilience. This workbook is aimed at Year 9 and Year 10 students but can be adapted to all secondary students. The reflections and activities in this workbook can be used as a resource in different subjects. For example, they are suitable for social justice issues in Geography and History, and values education in subjects such as Religious Education and English. The purpose of this workbook is to provide students with a deeper understanding of the issues of poverty, disadvantage and social exclusion in Australia. This workbook also aims to influence young people's values, attitudes and beliefs, so they can reflect positive values in their present and future behaviour.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1), BSL Archives (1).

Choir of Hard Knocks : the voice of Reclink : Opera House special /

by Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Australian Broadcasting Corporation 2008Description: 1 videodisc (DVD) (ca 113 min.) : sd., col. ; 12 cm.Notes: Music Publisher number : R-108355-9 Consultant executive producer and original idea by Jason Stephens Series director Bruce PermezelSummary: "Twelve months ago Jonathon Welch brought together a group of Melbourne's disadvantaged to form a choir, but had no idea what a sensation the choir would become. Now the 42 members of the Choir of Hard Knocks have been invited to perform in the Opera House concert hall. Taking such a disparate group on the road is a risky venture, and the stakes are high. It's a real show of faith in the Choir, and nerve racking for the organisers. It's a massive logistical operation given the varied emotional and physical needs of the choristers. For most, it will be their first time on a plane or their first trip interstate. Following on from ABC TV's inspirational series, this hour-long special shows the Choir of Hard Knocks as they prepare to travel to Sydney to sing on one of the world's great stages."--ABC website.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Choir of Hard Knocks : the voice of Reclink /

by Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Australian Broadcasting Corporation 2007Description: 1 compact disk (CD).Notes: Music Publisher Catalogue Number: 4766166 Consultant executive producer and original idea by Jason Stephens Series director Bruce PermezelSummary: The Choir of Hard Knocks is an eclectic group of disadvantaged and homeless people who have created an unlikely musical phenomenon. This group of around 50 men and women have come together under the leadership of former Opera Australia principal Jonathon Welch, who has transformed a disparate bunch of people into a bona fide choir. This heart-warming CD follows the choir's journey towards their Gala Launch Concert, all of which was captured on the five-part ABC TV series The Choir of Hard Knocks.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Down and out : poverty and exclusion in Australia /

by Saunders, Peter | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Bristol, U.K. Policy Press 2011Description: xiii, 276 p. : ill.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index Mentions the Brotherhood of St LaurenceSummary: Drawing on the author's extensive research expertise and his links with welfare practitioners , this landmark study provides the first comprehensive assessment of the nature and associations between the three main forms of social disadvantage in Australia: poverty, deprivation and social exclusion.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Low skills and social disadvantage in a changing economy /

by Hasluck, Chris.

Publisher: UK Commission for Employment and Skills September 2011Description: 72p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliog.Summary: This paper explores the link between social disadvantage and low skill. Social disadvantage is a wide-encompassing term that embraces economic, social and even political deprivation. This review considers the prospects for people who are disadvantaged by a lack of skill and/or qualifications. A low-level of skill or educational attainment is one indicator of social disadvantage of particular significance in regard to a person?s economic and labour market status. Clearly a lack of skill is not the only factor that may disadvantage a person in the labour market and where individuals suffer from additional disadvantages such as disability, poor health or discrimination, their labour market position will be further weakened. ; A useful analogy of the labour market is to think of it as a job queue. In that queue the disadvantaged are those who are ranked towards the lower end of that labour market queue. This is defined as the group whose employment opportunities are restricted to poorly paid and routine, elementary occupations, or who are excluded from employment (either unemployed or economically inactive). A lack of skills or qualifications tends to place people at the end of the labour queue, although other characteristics (such as age, gender, or ethnic origin) will also have an impact. While low skill/no qualifications is not a conventional definition of ?disadvantage?, there is a strong association between low skills or no qualifications and those characteristics more usually seen as signalling disadvantage and which are dealt with in other equality and skills papers in the series.Availability: (1)

Measuring financial exclusion in Australia /

by Connolly, Chris | Centre for Social Impact.

Publisher: Kensington, N.S.W. University of New South Wales 2013Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2013 Includes bibliographic referencesSummary: This year's report highlights the substantial and growing proportion of the Australian population who remain excluded from financial services. Combined with earlier reports in this research series, we can see that there is a large unmet need for access to affordable and appropriate products. The report also provides a comprehensive profile of the demographic characteristics of Australians who are excluded, highlighting factors such as age, income, country of birth and location. We also provide insights into the key difficulties reported by individuals who struggle to obtain or keep financial products.Availability: (1)

Measuring financial exclusion in Australia, May 2011 /

by Hems, Les | Centre for Social Impact | Connolly, Chris | Wolfson, Lew | Georgouras, Meiko | Sultana, Saida.

Publisher: Kensington, N.S.W. University of New South Wales. Centre for Social Impact 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011 Published for the National Australia Bank Bibliography pp. 30-31Summary: The primary objective of this research is to define and deepen understanding of financial exclusion in Australia and its relationship with social and economic disadvantage. The research benefitted from unique access to some of Australia's largest stores of private data. We were able to combine access to the Roy Morgan Single Source Survey, consisting of over 50,000 interviews per annum, with access to the de-identified banking records of several million NAB customers, in addition to other data sources. As a result, this study is certainly the largest and most detailed examination of financial exclusion that has been undertaken in Australia, and one of the largest studies of this type in the world.Availability: (1)

Measuring financial exclusion in Australia, May 2012 /

by Hems, Les | Centre for Social Impact | Connolly, Chris | Georgouras, Meiko.

Publisher: Kensington, N.S.W. University of New South Wales. Centre for Social Impact 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2012 Published for the National Australia Bank Bibliography : p. 42 Includes appendicesSummary: Research for the Measuring Financial Exclusion in Australia has found that just under three million, or 17.2% of Australians, are now either fully or severely financially excluded from affordable and appropriate financial services. CSI's research lead on this project is Chris Connolly. The report was launched by NAB's Group CEO, Cameron Clyne, who said: ?Financial inclusion has an obvious and invaluable social impact, but there is also a very strong economic case, like greater workforce participation, reduced welfare and health costs, that validate and confirm its importance."Availability: (1)

Moving from the edge : stories of achieving greater social inclusion /

by Vinson, Tony | Jesuit Social Services.

Publisher: Richmond, Vic. Jesuit Social Services 2010Description: 103 p. : ill.Notes: A study by Jesuit Social Services Bibliography : p. 102-103Summary: The stories told in Moving from the Edge show that given the opportunity, people who were previously 'outsiders' can find places in society that are satisfying to them and productive from the community's viewpoint. This study personalises the policies and discussions about social inclusion. It forcefully reminds us that behind each statistic about social exclusion lies a person - a unique and valuable human being with hopes and aspirations; a person often facing daunting barriers to their full flourishing as human beings and citizens.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Promoting healthy finances : an evaluation of the Financial Health Service pilot /

by Arashiro, Zuleika | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Edition: 2011Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: PDF 41 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Summary Notes: Includes "Promoting healthy finances : an evaluation of the Financial Health Service pilot : research summary."Summary: An evaluation of a free, one-on-one, financial information and guidance service piloted in Melbourne by the Brotherhood of St Laurence for financially vulnerable people found that clients considered good communication and trust as key qualities of such a service, and preferred face-to-face consultation over other channels such as bank branches or the internet. Most clients sought information on how to deal with rising basic costs and very limited income. The service helped boost clients? confidence and willingness to seek future guidance, but there was no straightforward relationship between knowledge and action.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Social exclusion monitor bulletin, October 2013 /

by Azpitarte, Francisco | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2013; University of Melbourne. Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2013Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2013 ; Francisco Azpitarte, Henderson Research Fellow, Economist, 2011-2018 Francisco is an economist who joined the Research and Policy Centre in early 2011. He was appointed to the Ronald Henderson Research Fellow joint position at the Melbourne Institute, University of Melbourne and the Brotherhood of St Laurence Summary: In this fourth bulletin we summarise the results of the social exclusion monitor, recently updated using 2011 data, and investigate the capacity of annual measures of social exclusion and income poverty to identify the people who are chronically poor.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Social exclusion monitor bulletin, September 2011 /

by Horn, Michael | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Scutella, Roasanna | Wilkins, Roger.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic.Social exclusion monitor bulletin September 2011 2011Description: 9p. PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2011Summary: Understanding the level of social exclusion is a key step towards developing a more socially inclusive society. If Australia is to substantially improve community wellbeing and strengthen economic productivity, it is essential that we have a rigorous measure of the number of people experiencing exclusion as a benchmark to monitor social progress and the effectiveness of government policies. This bulletin is the first in a series of annual bulletins that will summarise the findings of our newly developed measure of social exclusion.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Social inclusion in Australia : how Australia is faring

by Australian Social Inclusion Board.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet Description: PDF.Online Access: 2010 | 2nd ed. (2012) Notes: PDF link: Social Inclusion in Australia : how Australia is faring (2010) ; Social Inclusion in Australia : how Australia is faring (2012), 2nd editionSummary: How Australia is faring tracks Australia's progress against a range of social inclusion indicators. It looks at how we're performing in relation to health and disability, employment, financial stress, education, access to services, housing, feelings of safety and engagement in community activities. The report highlights that while we're a thriving prosperous nation with high rates of employment, good health and high educational attainment, there are still people who are at risk of being left behind. In particular, around 5% (or 640,000) of working age Australians continue to experience multiple and entrenched disadvantage and income inequality has grown steadily since the mid-1990s.; "The Australian Social Inclusion Board was formed in May 2008... In this first annual report, we have chosen to present a statistical view of the nature and extent of social inclusion in Australia today in order to provide a baseline against which to measure future progress.." Introduction by ChairAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).

The social inclusion agenda : where it came from, what it means, and why it matters /

by Catholic Social Services Australia.

Publisher: Curtin, A.C.T. Catholic Social Services Australia 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2010 Bibliography : p. 53-60Summary: There are many causes of disadvantage and no one solution. As Monsignor David Cappo says: 'to ameliorate difficult social problems, multiple solutions are required' (Cappo, 2002). The social inclusion agenda needs to embrace a wide range of initiatives including adequate income support, community strengthening projects, early childhood interventions, employment and education programs and more flexible and innovative ways of administering and funding programs and services. Most importantly of all, Australians and their leaders must embrace the spirit of social inclusion : the willingness to reach out to others in love and friendship rather than in fear, pity or contempt. We can never fully achieve inclusion if we divide society into a burdensome and threatening them, and a burdened and threatened us. The whole point of social inclusion is to move from 'them' to 'us'.Availability: (1)

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