Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Ageing and skills : a review and analysis of skill gain and skill loss over the lifespan and over time /

by Desjardins, Richard | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development | Warnke, Arne Jonas.

Publisher: OECD Publishing 2012Description: PDF.Other title: OECD education working paper ; no. 72.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: EDU/WKP(2012)9 27-Mar-2012 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: The relationship between ageing and skills is becoming an important policy issue, not least in the context of population ageing. Data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) will potentially add considerably to the understanding of the relationship between ageing and foundation skills. In particular, the fact that data from the 1994-1998 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) and the 2003-2007 Adult Literacy and Lifeskills Survey (ALL) will be linked with PIAAC offers a unique opportunity to examine trends over time at the cohort level for a wide range of countries. Specifically, repeated measures will enable an analysis of whether there is skill gain and skill loss over the lifespan of cohorts and overtime between cohorts. This is especially important because age-skill profiles observed on the basis of a single cross-section are difficult to interpret. With this as a backdrop, this paper has sought to provide an overview of what is known about age-skill profiles and to conduct an analysis that demonstrates how trend data based on repeated cross-sectional observations of direct measures of skill at the cohort level can be used to estimate skill gain and skill loss over the lifespan and over time.Availability: (1)

An agenda for new skills and jobs : a European contribution towards full employment /

by European Commission.

Publisher: Strasbourg European Commission 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: The European Union has agreed on an employment rate target for women and men of 75% for the 20-64 years age group by 2020: an ambitious commitment to the sustainability of Europe's social model, welfare systems, economic growth and public finances. Bridging the gap to the target will be no easy task. The crisis has brought the employment rate down to 69%, and the unemployment rate up to 10%; assuming the labour market stabilises in 2010-2011, achieving an employment rate of 75% by 2020 will require an average employment growth slightly above 1% per annum. With declining fertility rates, the EU working age population (15-64) will start shrinking as early as 2012; even with continuing immigrant flows. A skilled workforce is an essential asset to develop a competitive, sustainable and innovative economy in line with Europe 2020 goals. In times of budgetary constraints and unprecedented global competitive pressures, EU employment and skills policies that help shape the transition to a green, smart and innovative economy must be a matter of priorityAvailability: (1)

Assessing the incidence and wage effects of overskilling in the Australian labour market /

by Mavromaras, Kostas | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | McGuinness, Seamus | Fok, Yin King.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Australia s net gains from international skilled movement in 2004-05 and earlier years . /

by Birrell, Bob | Rapson, Virginia | Smith, T. Fred.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Department 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.immi.gov.au/media/publications/pdf/aus_net_gais_int_kills_mnt_2004_05_.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:27:37 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Australian immigration and settlement in the 21st century : /

by Colic-Peisker, Val | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Includes bibliographical references. INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This paper analyses quantitative data on settler arrivals in Australia over the past decade and data from the most recent Australian census in order to address two main questions: 1. who gets Australian permanent visas through two points-tested immigration programs, - Family and Skill, and 2. how do highly skilled settlers fare in the Australian labour market. Both questions focus on the variable of the country of birth/country of citizenship of the immigrants as the two characteristics largely overlap.Availability: (1)

Australian vocational education and training statistics : employers use and views of the VET system 2019

by National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2019Description: 21 p. : PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This publication presents information on employers’ use and views of the vocational education and training (VET) system. The findings relate to the various ways in which Australian employers use the VET system to meet their skill needs and their satisfaction with the training. Australian employers can engage with the VET system in three main ways, by: having jobs that require vocational qualifications ; having apprentices and trainees ; using nationally recognised training. Also presented in this publication is information on employers’ use and satisfaction with unaccredited training, and recruitment difficulties experienced in the last 12 months. The figures in this publication are derived from the Survey of Employers’ Use and Views of the VET System. A total of 7007 interviews were conducted with Australian employers between February and June 2019 and the results relate to employers’ training experiences in the 12 months preceding their interview. Note for the purposes of this publication, nationally recognised training excludes training that was part of an apprenticeship or traineeship as employers’ use and views of apprentices and trainees is reported separately Availability: (1)

Australian workforce futures : a National Workforce Development Strategy. /

by Skills Australia.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Skills Australia 2010Description: 104 p. : ill. col. tables charts.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Skills Australia has released its paper Australian Workforce Futures: A National Workforce Development Strategy reporting recommendations for a fundamental overhaul in the way the nation approaches and supports workforce development at a national, industry and enterprise level. The vision for this strategy is that Australia has the workforce capability it requires for a productive, sustainable and inclusive future, and that Australian enterprises have the capacity to develop and use the skills of their workforce to maximum advantage for the benefit of industry and the communityAvailability: (1)

Better skills, better jobs, better lives : a strategic approach to skills policies /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: OECD Publishing 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 58-62Summary: Skills transform lives and drive economies. Without adequate investment in skills, people languish on the margins of society, technological progress does not translate into economic growth, and countries can no longer compete in an increasingly knowledge-based global society. People with poor skills face a much greater risk of experiencing economic disadvantage, and a higher likelihood of unemployment and dependency on social benefits. ; The OECD Skills Strategy provides a strategic framework to help countries understand more about how to invest in skills in a way that will transform lives and drive economies. It will help countries to identify the strengths and weaknesses of their existing national skills pool and skills systems, benchmark them internationally, and develop policies for improvement. In particular, the strategy provides the foundations upon which governments can work effectively with all interested parties - national, local and regional government, employers, employees, and learners.Availability: (1)

Climate change, employment and local development, Sydney, Australia : a report by the Local Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Programme of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) /

by Miranda, Gabriela | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. ocal Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Programme.

Publisher: Geneva, Switzerland Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 2011Description: PDF.Notes: Bibliography : p. 124-132 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This report presents the analysis and key findings of the project on Climate Change, Employment and Local Development in Sydney, Australia, carried out by the OECD Local Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Programme. Sydney and its main organisations are undergoing an important transformation in terms of the approach to human capital development, growth and job creation, and integrating the sustainability component into the greater metropolitan Sydney strategy and actions. Sydney is leading a wave of transformation in the country and has some state-of-the-art initiatives that are examples to other OECD regions. However, a challenge remains with respect to the governance of the system and the adjustment of programmes to the new needs of a low-carbon economy. This report analyses the challenges and opportunities of Sydney in this context, and provides some policy recommendations on how the public authorities and other key agencies could best support the emergence of a green economy - making the best use of the skills available while creating wealth and growth.Availability: No items available

Creating a future direction for Australian vocational education and training : a discussion paper on the future of the VET system /

by Skills Australia.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Skills Australia 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010 Includes bibliographical references SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Australia needs people to have more skills and to use them productively in the workplace. We also need higher rates of workforce participation. To help achieve these goals we need to increase demand from employers to take on and use these skills. This comes hand in hand with improving the depth, range and responsiveness of services the VET system provides. However, the uptake of training will not happen unless students, employers and the community have confidence in the quality and appropriateness of VET services and providers. This paper outlines a number of issues for discussion that can help set the direction Australian vocational education and training might take to achieve these objectives. Many of the issues will be familiar to those working in and with the sector. Skills Australia is keen to tap into this knowledge and experience to come up with workable solutions. We want to hear from people who use or have used the VET system- what are the directions the VET sector can take so it better meets your requirements?Availability: (1)

Differing skill requirements across countries and over time /

by Ryan, Chris | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Sinning, Mathias.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 36Summary: This report investigates skill matches to job requirements for workers in Australia, New Zealand, the United States and Canada. It might be expected that differences between the four countries in economic growth, technological innovation and structural change in the labour market may have led to differences in job skill requirements and use. This research finds, however, that the broad match of workers to jobs that use their skills is quite similar for the four countries, although some differences in the patterns of skill use over time were identified. This is one of the research reports resulting from a three-year program of research (Securing their future: older workers and the role of VET).Availability: (1)

Disaggregated models of unemployment in Australia. /

by Borland, Jeff | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2000Availability: No items available

Dustman, milliner and watchcase maker : skilling Australia /

by Beddie, Francesca | National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This paper was presented at the Professional Historians Association (NSW) Islands of History conference held on Norfolk Island in July 2010. It argues that the reliance on overseas workers to address skills shortages has been present ever since the first white settlement of Australia and suggests some areas for primary historical research. (NCVER summary)Availability: (1)

Education and skill mismatches in the labour market : editors' introduction. /

by Mavromaras, Kostas | McGuinness, Seamus.

Publisher: 2007Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKAvailability: No items available

Educational Mismatch : are high-skilled immigrants really working at high-skilled jobs and the price they pay if they aren't? /

by Chiswick, Barry R | Institute for the Study of Labor | Miller, Paul W.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2009Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This paper examines the incidence of the mismatch of the educational attainment and the occupation of employment, and the impact of this mismatch on the earnings, of high-skilled adult male immigrants in the US labor market. Analyses for high-skilled adult male native-born workers are also presented for comparison purposes. The results show that over-education is widespread in the high-skilled US labor market, both for immigrants and the native born. The extent of over-education declines with duration in the US as high-skilled immigrants obtain jobs commensurate with their educational level. Years of schooling that are above that which is usual for a worker's occupation are associated with very low increases in earnings. Indeed, in the first 10 to 20 years in the US years of over-education among high-skilled workers have a negative effect on earnings. This ineffective use of surplus education appears across all occupations and high-skilled education levels. Although schoolin! g serves as a pathway to occupational attainment, earnings appear to be more closely linked to a worker's occupation than to the individual's level of schooling.Availability: (1)

Evaluation of skilled migration to the Riverina . /

by New South Wales. Community Relations Commission For a multicultural.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Commission 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.crc.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/2884/evaluation-skilled-migration-to-riverina.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:41:15 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response Into & out of work INTO AND OUT OF WORKAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Framework and tools for assessing and understanding the green economy at the local level /

by Eberts, Randall W | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. ocal Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Programme.

Publisher: Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011Summary: The transition to a green economy will imply many changes in the labour market locally and the local development systems. The impacts are still difficult to measure as definitions vary and policy uncertainties persist. The OECD Local Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Programme is making an important contribution to these debates with its project on Climate Change, Employment and Local Development which is looking at the obstacles hindering green growth at the local level and the policy frameworks needed to ensure skills availability, economic activity and market opportunities in the green economy. This report makes a valuable contribution to the OECD LEED work on the transition to a green economy and its implications at the local level.Availability: (1)

Green jobs and skills : second report of session 2008-09 : report, together with formal minutes, oral and written evidence /

by Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons. The nvironmental Audit Committee.

Publisher: London, U.K. The Stationery Office Limited 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 8 December 2009 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: Employment opportunities in low-carbon industries are significant. To take advantage of these in the face of global competition the UK Government must move quickly to identify those sectors in which the UK can take a lead. It must develop a strategy that encourages investment both by reducing barriers to growth and by ensuring a stable demand for lowcarbon products and services. The Low Carbon Industrial Strategy goes some way to achieving these two aims. It is actively targeting the renewable energy sector but does not effectively address a transition across the whole economy. There has been discussion and some activity, but the transition is not yet happening. Industry leaders and investors must be reassured that the Government is committed to long-term support for low-carbon industries. Businesses must be encouraged to take the low-carbon route to growth and a strong carbon price is best way to do this.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Higher education and the labour market. /

by Machin, Stephen | McNally, Sandra.

Publisher: 2007Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKAvailability: No items available

Immigrants' assimilation process in a segmented labor market /

by Alcobendas, Miguel Angel | Institute for the Study of Labor | Rodr guez-Planas, N ria.

Publisher: Institute for the Study of Labor 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: IZA Discussion paper ; no. 4394Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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