Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Strategies to re-engage young people not in education, employment or training : a rapid review /

by Nelson, Julie | Centre for Excellence and Outcomes in Children and Young People's Services.

Publisher: London, U.K. Centre for Excellence and Outcomes in Children and Young People's Services 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2011 Bibliography pp. 17-18 Appendix p. 19Summary: This short report presents preliminary findings from a larger review being conducted by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER). This review will examine evidence regarding effective strategies to keep young people at risk of disengagement from learning on track to make positive transitions, and will identify critical success factors in re-engaging young people who are already NEET (Not in Education, Employment or Training). This report will be published by NFER in December 2011. The evidence provided here is based on an initial assessment of 16 items of literature. Systematic searching of key databases and websites, and rapid screening of sources took place in late September and assessment and analysis of identified key items took place in early October.Availability: (1)

Submission to Review of Funding for Schooling / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Williamson, Jim.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: 35 p. PDF.Other title: Brotherhood of St Laurence submission to the Review of Funding for Schooling.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The submission details a number of key programs which the BSL has developed within Victoria and across Australia to increase school and home partnerships in disadvantaged neighbourhoods, and recommends that excellent initiatives, including the community VCAL program in Victoria, learning support programs, and student career pathway programs involving parents, are considered for scaling up nationally during the next funding period. ; VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING (VCAL)Availability: (1)

Submission to the House of Representatives Inquiry into combining school and work / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Horn, Michael.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2009Description: 7 p. PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) is an independent non-government organisation with strong community links that has been working to reduce poverty in Australia since the 1930s. Based in Melbourne, but with a national profile, the BSL continues to fight for an Australia free of poverty. We undertake research, service development and delivery, and advocacy with the objective of addressing unmet needs and translating the understandings gained into new policies, new programs and practices for implementation by government and others. The Brotherhood has a long history of research and service delivery focused on ensuring the successful transitions of young people and, in particular, disadvantaged young people. Our research record encompasses longitudinal research on the life chances of young Australians (Taylor & Nelms 2006, 2008), studies on young people’s transition to work (MacDonald 1999) and studies of their position and disadvantages in the labour market (Marsh & Perkins 2006; Tresize-Brown 2004). We have completed evaluations of the Brotherhood’s own services such as Parents as Career and Transition Supports (PACTS), the transition support service for parents (Bedson & Perkins 2006). In 2006 we produced the Brotherhood Social Barometer ‘Challenges facing Australian youth’ (Boese & Scutella 2006) that examined how well equipped Australian young people are (or are not) to negotiate successfully the transition through school and beyond. Our research and services focus on those people at greatest risk at key life transition stages considered critical to their future wellbeing. The second of these transition stages is Through School to Work. Accordingly, we welcome the opportunity to contribute to the inquiry being conducted by the Standing Committee on Education and Training into the now common experience of Australian students balancing the demands and benefits of combining study and employment and, in particular, the opportunities for and needs of disadvantaged youth in this context. Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).

Submission to the MCEETYA consultation on the National Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Kamp, Annelies.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.), 2008Description: 11 p. PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The Brotherhood welcomes the reiteration of the collective responsibility for young people’s education and, in particular, the commitment of a new level of collaboration between all Australian governments in ensuring enhanced educational outcomes for all young Australians. We suggest that a commitment to enhanced intergovernmental collaboration is a necessary first step that will enable other stakeholders, including parents, communities and business, to contribute to improved educational attainment for all young people. In particular, there is a compelling need, as a priority in the post-compulsory years, for new funding models that align with current policy objectives. While schools will often recognise the need for a given young person to learn outside a school setting, some schools, particularly those in disadvantaged areas, are not able to ‘let go’ of sufficient student funding without compromising their staff/teacher ratios. This is an area for unprecedented intergovernmental agreement and action. We also strongly endorse the reframing of the National Declaration and, in particular, the recognition that in the current environment education rather than schooling is the key imperative. We welcome the move away from notions of teaching and curriculum to notions of learners who are also workers and community members and the need to be prepared for each of these roles. However, in establishing a goal for young Australians to be able to accept responsibility for their own actions (p.5), the government must not move the burden of responsibility for success to young people, some of whom are already dealing with major structural barriers and material deprivations that result from decisions of others and that profoundly affect their ability to act. The draft Declaration rightly elevates the attention given to supporting young Australians in becoming active and informed citizens. As noted in our submission on the establishment of an Australian Youth Forum (Brotherhood of St Laurence 2008), children and young people have a right to participate in the decisions that affect them, in accordance with Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Beyond this right, in the context of globalisation it is imperative that education focuses not only on the development of young people’s identity as worker but also on their identity as citizen. Historically, this focus on the worker/citizen has been a central concern of education systems; yet this balance has since the 1980s been skewed to focus on young people’s future worker identity (Seddon 2008). In a context of increasing diversity and inequality, the Brotherhood strongly endorses an enhanced focus on young people becoming active, informed citizens. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1), BSL Archives (1).

Submission to the Victorian Government on skills reform. / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Kamp, Annelies.

Publisher: Fitzroy Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2008Description: 14 p. PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence welcomes the opportunity to respond to the Discussion Paper on Skills Reform. Our responses are framed around a recommendation that the Victorian Government should: Ensure every Victorian school-leaver develops a learner–worker identity complemented by competency in employability skills in general and literacy and numeracy in particular ; Increase and sustain funding for the range of transition supports through school to work Provide incentives to employers to support them in recruiting and selection young apprentices and trainees ; Fund access to skills audit and recognition of prior learning mapped to AQF qualifications for all currently employed Victorians who lack an initial qualification at a minimum of CIII level ; Equip all employers with the skills, knowledge and resources to ensure their employees’ successful participation in and completion of nationally recognised training mapped to their workplace requirements ; Adequately fund workplace literacy initiatives for all enterprises identifying issues with workplace literacy ; Offer incentives for TAFE to move away from course-based learning to customised responses, delivered in partnership where necessary, to meet the assessed needs of individuals and businesses ; Strengthen the commitment to applied learning pedagogies in all domains of teacher training. Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).

Successes and challenges in re-engagement : evaluating the third year of a Community VCAL education program for young people /

by Myconos, George | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2013Description: 9 p. PDF.Other title: Myconos Successes and challenges in re engagement 2012 CVCAL evaluation 2013.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: In Frankston, the Brotherhood of St Laurence has developed a Community VCAL program for 15 to 18-year-olds who have faced barriers to mainstream education. Students undertake the Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning?a Years 11 and 12 course which combines classroom tuition with vocational training and work placements?in a community setting. This evaluation of the program?s third year affirms the effectiveness and value of the program, but does so while noting the difficulties experienced in 2012 and signalling some important challenges ahead.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Successful youth transitions /

by Liu, Shu-Hui | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Nguyen, Nhi.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Briefing Paper ;.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibiography : p. 7-8Summary: Achieving the transition to adulthood is not straightforward. This briefing paper defines a successful youth transition based on previous research and considers a range of factors that affect transitions. A number of interventions which can help young people make a successful youth transition are also discussed.Availability: (1)

Supporting young people's career transition choices : the role of parents : interim evaluation of the Parents as Career Transition Supports (PACTS) program. /

by Perkins, Daniel | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Peterson, Carol.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2005Description: 24 p. PDF.Other title: Supporting young people's career transition choices.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Interim evaluation of the Parents As Career Transition Supports (PACTS) program March 2005Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

Sweet 16 : life chances and school to work transitions /

by Taylor, Janet | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Nelms, Lucy.

Publisher: 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Library also holds print copy in archives SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence's longitudinal study, the Life Chances Study, provides data to explore the experiences of a diverse group of Australian-born young people. The study commenced in 1990 with 167 children born in that year. By the end of 2006 some of the participants, now 16 year olds, were making crucial decisions about their futures. The transition from school to further training and employment is generally seen as a crucial aspect of the life course, but one that can differ across different socio-economic groups.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1), BSL Archives (1).
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Tackling early school leaving : a key contribution to the Europe 2020 agenda /

by European Commission.

Publisher: Brussels European Commission 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2011 Communication from the Commission to the European Parliament, the Council, the European Economic and Social Committee and the Committee of the Regions INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Europe's future depends largely on its young people. Through its Europe 2020 strategy, the European Union aims to support young people better and to enable them to fully develop their talents to their own as well as to their economy's and society's benefit. One of the headline targets agreed by the European Council is to reduce the share of early school leavers to less than 10% and to ensure that at least 40% of the younger generation have a tertiary qualification or equivalent. Improving the educational achievement of young people addresses both the aims for 'smart growth' by improving skills levels and for 'inclusive growth' by tackling one of the major risk factors for unemployment and poverty. 'Youth on the Move', one of the Europe 2020 flagship initiatives, emphasises the need to improve quality and equity in education and training, to provide more young people with the skills to become lifelong learners and the chance to experience learning mobility. Drastically reducing the numbers of young people leaving school early is a key investment not only in the prospects of each and every one of its young people but also in the future prosperity and social cohesion of the EU in general.Availability: (1)

The benefits of vocational education and training /

by European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training.

Publisher: Luxembourg Publications Office of the European Union 2011Description: PDF.Other title: European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This European research review of the benefits of vocational education and training (VET) is released at a time when Europe is taking stock of the progress achieved in the Lisbon process and has launched a new strategy for growth and swift recovery from the economic crisis. Investment in human resources by education, training and other forms of learning is essential to achieving smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. VET will continue to play an important role in the shift towards more knowledge-intensive societies. Around half of all jobs in 2020 will require a medium-level qualification, which will often be achieved by some form of VET.Availability: (1)

The benefits to taxpayers from increases in students' educational attainment /

by Carroll, Stephen J | Erkut, Emre.

Publisher: Santa Monica, California RAND Corporation 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references. The research in this report was produced within RAND Education, a unit of the RAND Corporation, with support from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This report examines the financial benefits that taxpayers realize when students' educational attainment is increased. We find that the benefits to taxpayers from increases in students' educational attainment are very high. Regardless of a student's gender or race/ethnicity, raising his or her level of education leads, on average, to substantially ; increased payments into, and reduced demands on, the public budget. We consider the cost of providing additional education to students, although we do not explore the question of what it would cost to motivate students to stay longer in school. Our analysis indicates that taxpayers accrue benefits from programs and policies that succeed in raising students' education levels, and those benefits are entirely separate from the benefits that the students themselves gain through increased education. Accordingly, taxpayers, including those who do not have children in school, have a stake in developing programs and policies that effectively and efficiently increase education levels.Availability: (1)

The Brotherhood's social barometer : challenges facing Australian youth

by Boese, Martina | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Scutella, Rosanna.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2006Description: ii, 37 p. : ill; PDF.Other title: Challenges facing Australian youth.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Summary Notes: August 2006 Contains summary & main report Summary: The second Social Barometer examines how well equipped Australian youth are (or are not) to negotiate successfully the transition from childhood to adulthood, from school to work in a rapidly changing world. It presents indicators of young people s capabilities covering seven key dimensions of life from physical and mental health to education and employment and social and civic participation. Sections of the report are introduced by individual case studies. The barometer concentrates on national data, and pays particular attention to young people with socioeconomically disadvantaged, refugee and Indigenous backgrounds.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (2).

The educational and employment aspirations of Somali high-school students in Melbourne : some insights from a small study

by Omar, Yusuf Sheikh | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic.Paper presented at the 28th Annual AFSAAP Conference, Africa: Peace, Progress, Passion and Sustainability, Friday 25 November to Sunday 27 November 2005 University of New England, Armidale, NSW. 2005Description: ii, 31p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: November 2005 Summary: This report, based on a paper presented at the 28th AFSAAP Conference 2005, documents a small study involving interviews with Somali high-school students and their parents in Melbourne. The aim was to describe and analyse the parents views of their children s education and the types of employment they saw as desirable, as well as the students perspectives and aspirations, set against the background of Somali educational tradition and the pressures facing families adjusting to a new country.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

The effect of VET completion on the wages of young people /

by H rault, Nicolas | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Zakirova, Rezida | Buddelmeyer, Hielke.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 39-40 Appendices : p. 41-57 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Amongst recent initiatives aimed at lifting Australia's productivity has been a push for a greater number of course completions in both the vocational education and training and higher education sectors. With this, it could be assumed, come benefits for the individual such as better job opportunities and higher wages. Using the 1995 and 1998 cohorts of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth, this study looked at whether participating in or completing a post-secondary education qualification led to wage benefits for young people. The study finds that not only completing a post-secondary course but participating in one results in higher wages.Availability: (1)

The effects of macroeconomic conditions on the education and employment outcomes of youth /

by Hérault, Nicolas | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research | Kostenko, Weiping | Marks, Gary | Zakirova, Rezida.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2010Description: 29 p. : ill.Other title: Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2010 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This paper examines the impact of macroeconomic conditions on the education and employment outcomes of youths in school-to-work transition. The dataset is based on five different cohorts from the Youth in Transition surveys (YIT) and the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) and covers the period from 1985 to 2006, which is long enough to control explicitly for both poor and positive macroeconomic conditions. The multivariate analyses show that both the unemployment rates, and to a lesser extent economic growth rates, have an impact on youths? education and employment outcomes. Although the effects vary significantly by gender and education level, overall the results reveal that poor macroeconomic conditions tend to drive young people out of full-time work and into inactivity or part-time work. In addition, poor macroeconomic conditions tend to discourage further education. A result worth noticing is that males who did not complete secondary school suffer the largest increase in unemployment risks as the unemployment rate increases.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The first year experience : the transition from secondary school to university and TAFE in Australia. /

by Hillman, Kylie.

Publisher: Camberwell, Vic. Australian Council for Educational Research 2005Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.acer.edu.au/research/projects/lsay/reports/lsay40.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:28:37 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The forgotten half : a Demos and Private Equity Foundation report /

by Birdwell, Jonathan | DEMOS | Grist, Matt | Margo, Julia.

Publisher: London, U.K. DEMOS 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 201-213 INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: However those most at-risk will be the estimated 50 per cent of school leavers not continuing to higher education. This 'forgotten half' will exit the gates without many of the key skills they require and the support structure they deserve as they walk towards an uncertain future. Demos predicts youth unemployment at 20 per cent over the next five years, with this group the most vulnerable. For many it may quickly lead to a cycle of disengagement and lost dreams - not in education, employment or training (NEET). Without clear support, the forgotten half of school leavers too often fall into the cracks that exist between statutory services and charitable interventions and they enter a revolving door of training programmes. The Private Equity Foundation is a philanthropic foundation focused on helping children and young people stay the path to reach their full potential. Demos has outlined 10 recommendations to the Coalition Government to help these young people. These include focusing on the employability skills, such as literacy and numeracy, they need to succeed in work and life; giving them the support they need to stay on track, such as information about and the experience of the world of work alongside mentoring. These skills will provide this group with the critical protection they need to avoid becoming NEET.Availability: (1)

The future of work and young people's pathways to adulthood : an issues paper prepared for the Commission for the Future of Work. /

by Australian Council of Social Service.

Publisher: East Sydney, N.S.W. Australian Council of Social Service 1996Description: 39 p.Notes: April 1996. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The impact of VET in Schools on the intentions and achievements of young people /

by Nguyen, Nhi | National Centre for Vocational Education Research.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Briefing paper ;.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2010 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This briefing paper assesses the effect VET in Schools programs have on school retention, post-school vocational education and training (VET) and employment, and on young people's school and post-school aspirations. VET in Schools programs are seen as a way to increase Year 12 retention through broadening subject choices in the school curriculum. Research based on the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth suggest that, while participation in these programs has positive effects on attitudes to and satisfaction with school, it does not necessarily lead to increased Year 12 retention. However, participation in VET in Schools can influence a small group of students, who are intent on getting a job straight after school, to change their post-school plans to include further VET study or an apprenticeship or traineeship.Availability: (1)

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