Brotherhood of St Laurence

Your search returned 40 results.

Not what you expected? Check for suggestions
A path to re-engagement : evaluating the first year of a Community VCAL education program for young people

by Myconos, George | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: viii, 47 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Summary Notes: Includes "A path to re-engagement : evaluating the first year of a Community VCAL education program for young people : research summary."Summary: In Frankston, the Brotherhood of St Laurence has developed a Community VCAL program tailored for young people aged 15 to 18 who have experienced barriers to mainstream education. Students undertake the Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning - a Years 11 and 12 course which combines classroom tuition with vocational training and work placements - in a community setting rather than in a school. The evaluation of the inaugural year found that, notwithstanding some challenges, the program made a significant difference to the educational opportunities of most of its students. ; VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING (VCAL)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A taste for learning : evaluating a pre-Community VCAL program

by Myconos, George | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2010Description: viii, 28 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 27-28Summary: This report evaluates a pre-Community VCAL 'Taster' course offered at the Brotherhood of St Laurence's Frankston High Street Centre. The course engaged young people who were seriously disaffected with mainstream secondary school education, and who were facing their transition to adulthood without having acquired important skills. It provided valuable literacy, numeracy, vocational and social skills tuition, as well as the experience these students needed to make judgments about continuing vocational or further education. ; VICTORIAN CERTIFICATE OF APPLIED LEARNING (VCAL)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Against the odds : influences on the post-school success of 'low performers' /

by Thomson, Sue | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Hiliman, Kylie.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2010Description: 36 p. : ill., graphs, tables.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : pp. 32 Appendices : pp. 33-36 INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: The link between academic achievement and labour market outcomes is well established. But how well does a student's achievement in a test predict their later success in life? This study examines this question, with 'success' considered to encompass satisfaction with life together with the extent to which young people are fully occupied with education, employment or a combination of these. Low performers in mathematics in the 2003 Programme for International Student Assessment were the focus. The study found that 'low performing' status has little impact on future success. Further, students who saw the value of mathematics for their future success were more likely to achieve this success.Availability: (1)

Early school leavers at risk. /

by McIntyre, John | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Freeland, John | Melville, Bernice.

Publisher: Leabrook, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 1999Description: vi, 160 p.Notes: Presents information on the experiences of young adults from the Central Coast of New South Wales.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Education Development Project : improving educational and housing outcomes for children experiencing homelessness : final evaluation report /

by Hanover Welfare Services | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Foundation for Young Australians Education Foundation Division.

Publisher: South Melbourne, Vic. Hanover Welfare Services 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2009 A National Homelessness Strategy Demonstration ProjectSummary: Education literature has clearly established the importance of the middle years of schooling as a time where average student achievement can plateau or decline. Critically, the middle years are also consistent with the age when children and young people experiencing homelessness begin to disengage from school. Children experiencing homelessness are less likely to attend school, more likely to finish their schooling early and not as likely to progress as far educationally as other children. This in turn least to limited life choices for these children and also longer-term costs in unemployment and lost productivity to the community. The Education Development Project was a two year pilot project jointly managed by the Brotherhood of St Laurence, the Education Foundation division of the Foundation for Young Australians and Hanover Welfare Services. The central hypothesis of the project was that any improvement in educational engagement for children in the middle years of school (Years 5-9) who are experiencing homelessness requires changes in current practices in the homelessness and education sectors.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Lists:

Effective pre-school, primary and secondary education 3-14 project (EPPSE 3-14) Final report from the key stage 3 phase: Influences on students' development from age 11 - 14 /

by Sylva, Kathy | Great Britain. Department for Education | Melhuish, Edward | Sammons, Pam.

Publisher: London, U.K. Department for Education 2012Description: PDF.Other title: Great Britain. Department for Education. Research Report ;.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: "March 2012"--Last page. Bibliography : p. 137. Includes AppendicesSummary: Since 1997 the Effective Pre-school, Primary and Secondary Education project (EPPE/EPPSE) has investigated the attainment and development of approximately 3,000 children from pre-school to the end of Key Stage 3 (KS3). This current phase of the research explored how different phases of education, especially secondary school, are related to students' attainment, social behaviour and dispositions at age 14 (Year 9 in secondary school) and the factors that predict developmental change. However, schools are not the only influence on students' development; families and communities matter too and these 'social' influences are carefully studied in EPPSE 3-14. The net effects of neighbourhood, pre-school, primary and secondary school are reported after taking account of individual student and background influence. The key findings include: ; Differences in academic attainment and social-behavioural development related to background emerged early (at age 3) and remained fairly stable to age 14. ; Students who experienced multiple disadvantage in the early years had an increased risk of poorer social-behavioural development and lower attainment at age 14. ; Positive parenting experiences, especially the early years Home Learning Environment (HLE) helps to promote better longer term outcomes. ; There were continuing effects of pre-school quality for later attainment in maths and science, but not in English. Higher pre-school quality also predicted better social-behavioural outcomes at age 14. The effectiveness (a 'value-added' measure) of the pre-school attended was also important for all three academic outcomes. ; High quality pre-school had particular benefits for children who had a poor early years HLE. ; ?Parents helped through 'active cultivation'. They valued learning, provided emotional support, and had high aspirations and standards of behaviour. They provided practical support by encouraging participation in extra-curricular activities etc. Parents' own resilience in the face of hardship provided a role model for their children's efforts. ; These parents recognised that pre-school developed literacy, numeracy and social skills as well as preparing children for school.Availability: (1)

Family background, gender and cohort effects on schooling decisions. /

by Valbuena, Javier.

Publisher: University of Kent. School of Economics June 2011Description: 54 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: In this paper we use unique retrospective family background data from Wave 13 of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) on different birth cohorts to analyze the relevance of family background, in particular parental education, and gender on differential educational achievement. We find parents? education attainments to be strong predictors of the education of their offspring....AbstractAvailability: (1)

Good practice in re-engaging disaffected and reluctant students in secondary schools . /

Publisher: London, U.K. Ofsted 2008Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://tinyurl.com/5asn9o' Checked: 2/03/2009 9:56:26 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response School to work SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: "This report draws on a survey of 29 secondary schools, including one academy and one pupil referral unit, to identify sustained good practice in re-engaging disaffected students in their learning. The report illustrates the good practice in the schools visited and what might be achieved by others when reviewing support for disaffected students. The report emphasises the importance of also engaging parents and carers in supporting young people." -- Publisher websiteAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Have school vocational education and training programs been successful ? /

by Anlezark, Alison | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Karmel, Tom | Ong, Koon.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.ncver.edu.au/research/core/cp0302.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:23:58 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseSummary: This report investigates whether these school vocational education and training (VET) programs provide successful outcomes for participants, in terms of retention to Year 12 (or its vocational equivalent) and full-time engagement with employment or learning.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

How young people are faring [2010] '10 : the national report on the learning and work situation of young Australians /

by Robinson, Lyn | Foundation for Young Australians (FYA) | Lamb, Stephen | Walstab, Anne.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Foundation for Young Australians 2010Description: PDF.Other title: How young people are faring 2010.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 72-73 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: How Young People are Faring 2010 (HYPAF), published annually, is the foremost national report on the learning-and-earning situation of young Australians. The 2010 report shows that the number of teenagers not in full-time education or work remains as high now as it was in 2009, when unemployment spiked as a result of the global economic downturn. The proportion of teenagers ?disengaged? from work or education has stayed at 16.4%, which means that 246,000 teenagers are currently not in full-time education or work.Availability: (1)

How young people are faring 2011 : the national report on the learning and work situation of young Australians /

by Robinson, Lyn | Foundation for Young Australians (FYA) | Long, Mike | Lamb, Stephen.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Foundation for Young Australians 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 66Summary: The 2011 edition of How Young People are Faring brings together the most current information available on the education, training and work activities of young Australians. It is an opportunity to conduct a national stocktake, at a point in time, and also to view the picture that emerges in the context of longer-term trends. The How Young People are Faring series makes it possible, each year, to step back and consider how well our education and training system is meeting the needs of young people as they make the transition from school to further study and work. A particular focus in this 2011 report is on the second of these two destinations: the transition to work. The question of how successful young people are at moving into the labour market has added significance at a time of global economic uncertainty.Availability: (1)

How young people are faring 2012 : the national report on the learning /

by Robinson, Lyn | Foundation for Young Australians (FYA) | Lamb, Stephen.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Foundation for Young Australians 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 75Summary: This year's How Young People are Faring is the fifth edition of this annual report produced by the Foundation for Young Australians (fya) in partnership with the Centre for Research on Education Systems at the University of Melbourne. It provides an important point-in-time snapshot of young people?s transitions from school to further study, training and employment. ; It shows that there have been some solid gains during the last decade, particularly in educational participation as one critical means of improving opportunities for and ; life chances of young people. School retention rates have reached the highest level ever recorded. University-level attainment among 24 to 35 year-olds also increased from ; 24% in 2001 to 35% in 2011, tracking well for the Bradley target of 40%. The evidence continues to affirm the ; benefits of completing Year 12 or equivalent. Educational attainment improves the labour market and broader life prospects of young people. But long-term trends indicate that much more needs to be done in response to deeper challenges, such as those experienced by young people ; experiencing disadvantage, geographic isolation and those for whom conventional pathways from school to further study may not be the most desirable.Availability: (1)
Lists:

Human service gaps at the interface between urban and rural /

by Marston, Greg | RMIT University. Centre for Applied Social Research | Morgan, Leonie | Murphy, John.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. RMIT. Centre for Applied Social Research 2003Description: 104 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2003Availability: (1)
Lists:

Improving outcomes for students who are homeless : a discussion paper. /

by Archdall, Vivienne | Inglis, Robin.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Council to Homeless Persons ; Childrens Welfare Association of Victoria ; Youth Affairs Council of Victoria ; Victorian University of Technology 1996Description: 32 p.Notes: 'Prepared from a series of forums and workshops convened by the Council to Council to Homeless Persons'..tp. August 1996Summary: This discussion paper represents the collected thoughts and opinions of many educators, welfare workers, youth workers, teachers, academics, policy makers, and others interested in improving outcomes for students who are homeless.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Indigenous education 2010 /

by Hughes, Helen | Centre for Independent Studies | Hughes, Mark.

Publisher: St Leonards, NSW Centre for Independant Studies 2010Description: vii, 29 p.: ill. charts, graphs.Other title: CIS Policy Monograph 110.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The 2009 NAPLAN results for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students again show high rates of failure to meet the national minimum standards. Failure rates of 40 to 50% are common in Indigenous schools and rise to more than 70% in the Northern Territory. If schools are ranked by NAPLAN results, almost all the bottom 150 schools in such a notional list are Indigenous schools. There are few non-Indigenous schools in this bottom grouping and only a few Indigenous schools above this grouping. About 20,000 of Australia's 150,000 Indigenous students are enrolled in these Indigenous schools.Availability: (1)

Indigenous Participation in University Education /

by Lane, Joe.

Publisher: St. Leonards, N.S.W. The Centre for Independent Studies 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Researchers have called for changes to education process to emphasise a shift towards Indigenous students' successful completion of high school, rather than just 'attendance'. Although record numbers of Indigenous children enrolled in higher education - 8386 in 2007, compared with 5997 in 1997. Researchers say more must be done to improve educational outcomes for the 215 000 Indigenous children living in rural areas and 'welfare-dependent urban ghettos'. The research found Indigenous women were twice as likely to enroll in tertiary education as men, often a result of men following their fathers in trades and small business.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Influences on achievement in literacy and numeracy /

by Rothman, Sheldon | Australian Council for Educational Research | McMillan, Julie.

Publisher: Camberwell, Vic. Australian Council for Educational Research 2003Other title: Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research report 36.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: At head of title : Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. October 2003 SCHOOL TO WORKAvailability: (1)

Keeping up : strengthening transitions from education into work for Indigenous young people. /

by Hill, Regina.

Publisher: Glebe, N.S.W. Dusseldop Skills Foum 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Mapping Indigenous education . /

by Biddle, Nicholas | Hunter, Boyd | Schwab, Jerry.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research. Australian National University 2004Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.anu.edu.au/caepr/Publications/DP/2004_DP267.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:19:29 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Mobility manifesto : a report on cost effective ways to achieve greater social mobility through education, based on work by the Boston Consulting Group /

by Sutton Trust.

Publisher: London, U.K. Sutton Trust 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2010 Foreword by Sir Peter LamplSummary: The body of this report is a review of potential mobility enhancing education schemes. The backdrop, however, is a parallel analysis also undertaken by BCG that developed some overall estimates of the extra economic wealth that higher levels of social mobility would generate for the UK. Here, increased social mobility is defined as improved educational attainment for children from the most disadvantaged homes (with the least educated parents) effectively a weakening of the link between family background and children outcomes.Availability: (1)

Hosted by Prosentient