Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Multilevel survival analysis of health inequalities in life expectancy /

by Yang, Min | Eldridge, Sandra | Juan Merlo.

Edition: 2009, 8:31Publisher: 2009Description: PDF.Summary: Background ; The health status of individuals is determined by multiple factors operating at both micro and macro levels and the interactive effects of them. Measures of health inequalities should reflect such determinants explicitly through sources of levels and combining mean differences at group levels and the variation of individuals, for the benefits of decision making and intervention planning. Measures derived recently from marginal models such as beta-binomial and frailty survival, address this issue to some extent, but are limited in handling data with omplex structures. Beta-binomial models were also limited in relation to measuring inequalities of life expectancy (LE) directly.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Networking, coordinating, cooperating, collaborating? : Practising positive partnerships in the ethnic and multicultural community aged care sector /

by Karunarathna, Yoshitha | Monash University. Healthy Ageing Research Unit | Radermacher,Harriet | Feldman, Susan.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Ethnic Communities' Council of Victoria 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This report documents the first stage of a project which seeks to deepen understanding of organisational partnerships to inform sustainable inter-agency strategies and protocols towards practising positive partnerships in the multicultural community aged care sector.Availability: (1)

Not a one way street : research into older people's experiences of support based on mutuality and reciprocity /

by Bowers, Helen | Joseph Rowntree Foundation | Mordey, Marc | Runnicles, Dorothy | et al.

Publisher: York, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2011Description: PDF.Other title: JRF programme paper : Better life.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2011 Appendices pp. 25-34Summary: This paper explores alternative approaches to planning, funding and providing long term care for older people with high support needs; focuses on the ways older people with high support needs take up active roles based on 'mutuality and reciprocity'; provides stories and situations where those involved are giving and receiving support, rather than more traditional services provided by professionals/organisations and contributes to emerging discussions and developments associated with 'mutuality and reciprocity'.Availability: (1)

Older Australians and the Internet /

by Haukka, Sandra | Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for reative Industries and Innovation | Hegarty, Siobhan.

Publisher: Kelvin Grove, Qld. Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation (CCI) 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011 Appendices: p. 49-60Summary: In 2009, the auDA Foundation funded the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation (CCI) to explore what older Australians who never or rarely use the Internet (referred to as 'non-users' in this report) know about the types of online products and services available to them, and how they might use these products and services to improve their daily life.Availability: (1)

Older Australians and the Internet: bridging the digital divide /

by National Seniors Australia Productive Ageing Centre.

Publisher: Braddon, A.C.T National Seniors Australia Productive Ageing Centre 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2011 Includes referencesSummary: In recent years, the internet has become an essential tool for living. Whether making bookings, receiving updates on superannuation or shares, downloading university lectures or filling in government forms, the internet is the first option for more and more Australians. More people use internet-based communications to stay in touch with friends and family quickly and cheaply. Health and business services are increasingly migrating to the web, seeking lower costs and easier access. It is a profound shift in the way we live, but some older Australians are finding it hard to keep up. Older people with low internet skills are unable to conduct business or access important services over the web. They can be isolated from their community and family at a time in their lives when feeling connected is very important. In short, they are often on the wrong side of 'the digital divide'.Availability: (1)

Older people and the internet : towards a 'system map' of digital exclusion /

by Berry, Richard | International Longevity Centre UK.

Publisher: London, U.K. International Longevity Centre 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011 Bibliography : p. 15Summary: Older people are significantly less likely to have access to the internet than the general population. According to recent research findings, 79 per cent of households below the state pension age have internet access, while only 37 per cent of households above the state pension age do so. This difference gives rise to the notion of the digital divide, between those who enjoy access to the internet and those who are excluded. There have been a number of attempts to widen access to the internet, among older people and other excluded groups. There are ongoing upgrades of Britain's technological infrastructure, increasing internet capacity throughout the country. There are initiatives to counter the financial barriers to inclusion, by providing subsidised equipment or free internet access, in people's homes or in public places. The state has also supported the provision of training in ICT skills over a number of years.Availability: (1)

Older people's vision for long term care /

by Bowers, Helen | Joseph Rowntree Foundation | Macadam, Alison | Crosby, Gilly.

Publisher: York, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This study examined the experiences and aspirations of older people living in residential and nursing care homes. It highlights their ambition to increasingly influence decisions about care, support and wider issues such as whether or not to move to a care home, what helps to enhance their quality of life, and what is needed to promote their inclusion in care home, family and wider community life.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Older workers : research readings /

by Griffin, Tabatha (ed.) | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Beddie, Francesca (ed.).

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: 112 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references Contents : Introduction/Georgina Atkinson and Francesca Beddie -- Making the most of mature minds: issues, trends and challenges in making active ageing a reality/Jasper van Loo -- Employment at older ages in Australia: determinants and trends/Peter McDonald -- Ageism and age discrimination in the labour market and employer responses/Philip Taylor -- Economics of population ageing: Australia may not have a labour supply problem, but recent superannuation reforms have not helped/Bruce Headey -- Understanding mature-age workforce participation in Australia /Helen Kimberley and Dina Bowman --Older workers, employability and tertiary education and training/Stephen Billett. INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: One of the significant challenges facing Australia is the ageing of the population. This challenge has led policy-makers to consider how older workers can be kept in the workforce. To help generate discussion on older workers, NCVER commissioned six researchers to draft essays on various issues around keeping older Australians engaged with the workforce. These essays, and responses by six additional discussants, were presented at a roundtable held in Canberra in May 2011. Themes to arise from the roundtable included the need to consider the diversity of older workers, the challenges of low literacy and numeracy skills for some older workers, discrimination and stereotypes, and the recognition that not all older workers want to keep working.Availability: (1)

Other countries' policy initiatives to meet the housing needs of asset-poor older persons: implications for Australia /

by Wood, Gavin | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Colic-Peisker, Val | Berry, Mike | Ong, Rachel.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2010Description: HTML.Other title: Asset poverty and older Australians' transitions onto housing.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: More Information Positioning Paper: No. 133: Housing needs of asset-poor older Australians: other countries' policy initiatives and their implications for Australia Final Report: No. 156: Asset poverty and older Australians' transitions onto housing assistance programs Research and Policy Bulletin: Issue 139: Asset poverty and older Australians' transitions into housing assistance programsSummary: This study involved a systematic review of the international literature developed to meet the housing needs of asset-poor, older citizens. The purpose of this comparative review is to identify whether overseas experiences (looking at six countries: USA, UK, Canada, France, Italy and Germany) are applicable in the Australian context. The final report aims to explore how the asset-poor status of older Australians helps to determine their demand for housing assistance, the coping strategies used by the asset-poor as they strive to secure satisfactory housing outcomes and the importance of these outcomes to ontological security. Recent demographic changes, together with insecure employment circumstances in deregulated labour markets, innovations in housing finance and housing market volatility mean that wealth and debt positions are increasingly important in shaping the pathways into housing assistance programs. There are growing fears that those most exposed to these risks will enrol in housing assistance programs, because they can threaten home ownership status and cause asset poverty. Moreover, it is argued that these threats to housing wellbeing are particularly important for older Australians as they are less resilient than younger Australians when adverse shocks threaten their housing situation.Availability: (1)

Pathways in Aged Care : program use after assessment /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare [AIHW]. Data.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2011 Cat. no. CSI 10 Bibliography : p. 103-104Summary: Analysis of care pathways provides information that is useful to both policy planners and service providers alike. The Pathways in Aged Care (PIAC) cohort study linked aged care assessment data for a cohort of 105,100 people to data sets showing use of five main aged care programs and deaths over 4 years. This report presents an overview of the PIAC cohort, investigating care needs, assessment patterns, common care pathways, time to entry to permanent residential aged care and time to death after assessment for use of aged care services.Availability: (1)

Pension reform : how Canada can lead the world /

by Ambachtsheer, Keith | C.D. Howe Institute.

Publisher: Toronto, Canada C.D. Howe Institute 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Benefactors Lecture, 2009Summary: This 36-page Canadian lecture proposes a two-pronged plan for turning supplemental pension arrangements into an integrated, effective systemAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Pension reform for all : submission to the Pension Review of measures to strengthen the financial security of seniors, carers and people with a disability / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Naughtin, Gerrry.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2008Description: iv, 12 p. : ill. PDF.Other title: Brotherhood of St Laurence submission to the Pension Review .Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: There are strong grounds for the provision of immediate assistance to Australian pensioners. However, immediate assistance will not address the broader structural reforms required to achieve lasting benefits. Adequate pension reform requires comprehensive review of the taxation and income transfers systems, a task being undertaken by the Henry Review. The Pension Review should ensure additional support for people experiencing significant hardship until the recommendations of the broader review have been implemented. Substantial changes of the pension base prior to the completion of a system-wide review would be premature and unwise. Therefore, short-term assistance should be framed within the existing architecture of the annual adjustment system, bonuses and supplementary payments schemes. Adjustments to the aged, carer and disability pensions over the next three years should be through the mechanisms of the bonus system, increased rent assistance and utility allowances rather adjustment to the pension base. This submission sets out some broader issues that the Brotherhood considers must be examined by the Henry Review. A fair and sustainable solution will require additional public expenditure, as well as review of the regressive nature of many current taxation, concession and benefit arrangements. Australia needs a more integrated and equitable incomes and benefit transfers and taxation system for the twenty-first century. The Henry Review provides the vehicle for recommending such a comprehensive framework. The terms of the Pension Review and recent public debate about the adequacy of pensions have focused on pensions for older Australians, carers and people with a disability. While there is strong community and political support for additional assistance for these groups, there is no justification for excluding other income support recipients. Fairness requires that the aged, carers and people with a disability should not be advantaged at the expense of other groups Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).

Person and carer-centred respite care for people with dementia /

Publisher: Newcastle Upon Tyne, U.K. Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Aims and objectives ; The aim of this study is to develop practical tool(s) for evaluating person- and carer-centredness which can be used across a range of respite care services for people with dementia and their carers. Within this broad aim, the study has three objectives: ; ? To identify the range of models of respite care and describe how these are implemented in practice ; ? To develop an understanding of person- and carer-centred care and how it is operationalised in different models of respite care from the perspectives of people with dementia, carers and service providers ; ? To iteratively develop and test practical tool(s) for evaluating person- and carer-centred care.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Person-centred dementia care : a resource for staff and carers /

by Page, Meg | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2009Description: 23 p. : tables.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Edited by Georgina GarnerAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Person-centred dementia care : making services better /

by Brooker, Dawn.

Publisher: London, U.K. Jessica Kingsley Publishers 2007Description: 160 p.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Population ageing and structural adjustment /

by Giesecke, James | Meagher, G.A.

Publisher: 2008Availability: No items available

Realising the economic potential of senior Australians : changing face of society /

by Australia. The Treasury. Advisory Panel on the Economic otential of Senior Australians.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Treasury 2011Description: v, 27 p.: ill. col.Other title: Realising the economic potential of senior Australians: First.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Launch of the First report Brisbane, 26 August 2011Summary: Australian society is experiencing a major demographic change. Better health care, education and financial independence mean senior Australians will live longer and be more capable of making the most of their extended lives. ; We all need to recognise the opportunities created by this significant change. It is important we all benefit, as much as possible, from these extra years. ; This report is the first in a series examining the economic potential of senior Australians. ; Key themes that have arisen in consultations to date include: ; - participating in the workforce and in the community ; - being connected through the use of technology and broadband ; - pursuing lifelong learning and personal development ; - encouraging an age-friendly society ; - expanding opportunities to age well ; - planning for seniors? housing needs.Availability: (1)

Realising the economic potential of senior Australians : enabling opportunity /

by Australia. The Treasury. Advisory Panel on the Economic otential of Senior Australians.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Treasury 2011Description: viii, 58 p.: ill. col.Other title: Realising the economic potential of senior Australians:.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Release of the Second Report Canberra, 2 November 2011Summary: Australia's population is ageing. This demographic and societal transformation will result in an extended life course and the possibility of more time for a productive life in the middle years. Rather than being perceived as a threat, demographic change presents a period of great opportunity. It challenges individual Australians, organisations and the nation to capture the potential of an increased number of healthy, wealthier and skilled senior Australians. It also challenges all Australians to anticipate, plan for and invest in a longer life, so they can realise the choices that come from this planning and investment. This is an opportunity for individuals to empower themselves with a greater understanding of their own life potential and to make better informed decisions. If Australia overcomes barriers that inhibit the release of this potential, the nation, organisations and individuals can play their role in creating opportunities to harness the economic potential of senior Australians. The rewards will be substantial. The opportunities stem from maximising choices; utilising technology; keeping older people connected with family, neighbourhoods and workplaces; eliminating discrimination; developing markets; planning for longer more productive lives and encouraging flexibility. We face a potential future where older Australians continue contributing to society, the workplace and their own wellbeing to an extent not previously experienced. New industries tailored to these changing circumstances will evolve to provide services and goods to a larger and wealthier senior market. To make the most of this demographic shift, Australia needs to take a fresh approach to the four key areas that will enable these opportunities: health, housing, participation (both paid and unpaid) and lifelong learning. These developments are fundamental to an Australia that ages well. Understanding and capitalising on these areas and the dynamics between them, is critical as the nation adapts to the challenges of the 21st century.Availability: (1)

Realising the economic potential of senior Australians : turning grey into gold /

by Australia. The Treasury. Advisory Panel on the Economic otential of Senior Australians.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Treasury 2011Description: v, 53 p.: ill. col.Other title: Realising the economic potential of senior Australians: Third.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Launch of the First report Brisbane, 26 August 2011Summary: One of humanity?s greatest triumphs ? population ageing ? is also one of its greatest challenges. As many countries face increased economic and social demands from global ageing, it is timely to realise older people are a precious, often ignored, resource who contribute significantly to the fabric of our societies (WHO, 2002). ; The life course of Australians has changed. Most will live longer and enjoy an extended productive life in the middle years. ; As a nation, Australia needs to anticipate, adapt and capture the opportunities that an ageing population brings. ; Everyone ? the government, not-for-profit organisations, the private sector, individuals ? need to work in partnership to remove barriers, embrace all people for their contributions, and invest in people throughout their lives. In this way we will capture the full potential of these added years. ; The panel has made recommendations in areas it has found to be vital to enabling senior Australians to actively contribute to: ; - an ageing agenda ; - housing ; - participation ; - lifelong learning ; - active ageing ; - volunteering and philanthropy ; - age discrimination. ; The recommendations contained in this report are intended to drive change and adaptation in the economy and society. ; However this is only the start. It is crucial that governments, industry and community organisations work together to respond to these recommendations to allow Australia to reap the opportunities that are brought by a larger more active community of seniors. ; Australia is on the cusp of a wonderful opportunity. By building an age-friendly society and making the most of population ageing, we are creating a golden age, turning grey into gold.Availability: (1)

Recession could cause large increases in poverty and push millions into deep poverty : stimulus package should include policies to ameliorate harshest effects of downturn. /

by Parrott, Sharon.

Publisher: Washington, DC Center on Budget and Policy Priorities 2008Description: PDF.Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: "Like previous recessions, the current downturn is likely to cause significant increases both in the number of Americans who are poor and the number living in deep poverty, with incomes below half of the poverty line. Because this recession is likely to be deep and the government safety net for very poor families who lack jobs has weakened significantly in recent years, increases in deep poverty in this recession are likely to be severe. There are a series of steps that federal and state policymakers could take to soften the recession s harshest impacts and limit the extent of the increases in deep poverty, destitution, and homelessness." -- Executive summaryAvailability: No items available

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