Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Dementia and the take-up of residential respite care : an analysis using the PIAC cohort /

by Powierski, Andrew | Australian Institute of Health and Welfare | Karmel, Rosemary | Peut, Ann | Anderson, Phil.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare [AIHW]. Data.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2010 Cat. no. CSI 9 The authors of this report were Andrew Powierski, Rosemary Karmel and Phil Anderson of the Data Linkage Unit, and Ann Peut of the Ageing and Aged Care Unit, at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW).Summary: Caregivers regularly identify respite as their most urgent care need, and the provision of respite care has developed in response to this. Current evidence about respite use patterns for people with dementia and their carers is largely based on small-scale studies and qualitative research. This report assesses the take-up of residential respite care (RRC) following an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT) approval for people with and without dementia. It analyses data from the Pathways in Aged Care (PIAC) project which uses record linkage to identify use of aged care programs following an assessment by an ACAT. It focuses on the take-up of RRC by 32,000 people who were living in the community and had a relevant ACAT approval in the 2003-04 financial year.Availability: (1)

Dementia and the take-up of residential respite care /

by Powierski, Andrew | Australian Institute of Health and Welfare | Karmel, Rosemary | Peut, Ann | Anderson, Phil.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare [AIHW]. Bulletin ;.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2010 Cat. no. AUS 124 Bibliography : p. 22-23Summary: People caring for those with dementia have identified respite care as one of their critical care needs. Their low use of respite care, however, appears to belie this stated need. Evidence about respite use patterns for people with dementia and their carers has to date largely been based on small-scale studies and qualitative research. A recent systematic review of the literature on transitions in care of people with dementia found little that described common pathways and transitions between care types, including the use of respite care (Runge et al. 2009). This study aims to fill part of this evidence gap using nationally linked administrative data to quantify the extent to which residential respite care is taken up by those with and without dementia. The study is based on 32,000 members of the Pathways in Aged Care (PIAC) cohort who had an approval for residential respite care use from an Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT) in 2003?04.Availability: (1)

Dementia care in London /

by Sachrajda, Alice | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2011 Bibliography : p. 23Summary: Providing high-quality care and support for the increasing numbers of people with dementia is one of the most challenging and complex issues of our time. The number of people with dementia is set to double to 1.4 million in the next 30 years and the costs are expected to treble. ippr's work in this area responds to the need for service providers and commissioners to have a better evidence base on ageing in London. This briefing identifies areas of unmet need, highlights problems with current provision, and draws attention to models of best practice.Availability: (1)

Dementia risk reduction : a practical guide for health and lifestyle professionals /

by Farrow, Maree | Alzheimer's Australia.

Publisher: Scullin, A.C.T. Alzheimer's Australia 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2010Summary: This guide provides information for health and lifestyle professionals about modifiable risk and protective factors for dementia. Each section explains the evidence for the association of that factor with dementia risk and provides a practical guide to the resources available to health and lifestyle professionals to assist them to work with their clients to address factors of concern. Where possible, hyperlinks are provided to those resources. The guide aims to provide health and lifestyle professionals with a quick reference source to enable them to offer strategies to clients for maintaining their cognitive health and reducing their dementia risk. As many of the risk factors for dementia overlap with those for other chronic conditions that can be addressed by preventative health, the guide draws on existing guidelines and resources, and provides links to these.Availability: (1)

Diversity and financial elder abuse in Victoria : protecting elders' assets study /

by Wainer, Jo | State Trustees | Owada, Kei | Lowndes, Georgia | Darzins, Peteris.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Monash University. Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2011 Bibliography : p. 66-67Summary: This is a community based pilot study on the financial management practices and plans of older urban non-English speaking, and rural English speaking Victorians.Availability: (1)

Divorce and the wellbeing of older Australians /

by Gray, Matthew | Australian Institute of Family Studies | De Vaus, David | Qu, Lixia | Stanton, David.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Institute of Family Studies [AIFS]. Research paper.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2010Summary: This paper shows that divorce has a long-lasting, negative impact on wellbeing and the effects appear to persist into later life for both men and women. However, the negative effects of divorce on wellbeing are largely confined to those who do not re-partner and remain single. An important difference between men and women is that for women who are divorced and single, negative effects of divorce are found for general health, vitality and mental health, while for men, there appear to be no effects of divorce on these health measures.Availability: (1)

Don't stop thinking about tomorrow /

by Kelly, Simon.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling 2009Description: PDF.Summary: New research shows that Australians are not saving enough to afford a comfortable retirement yet they are working less and spending more years in retirement than ever before. ; According to this report we now expect to spend around 20 years in retirement after age 65. In 1909 only around half of all Australians lived to age 65. ; The report considers how realistic present retirement expectations are given levels of retirement savings. It considers the impact that increasing future superannuation contributions would have and whether increased superannuation will rescue baby boomer women from the poverty that appears likely to await many of them. ; To address the critical issue of adequate retirement funding the report considers the benefit of increasing the Superannuation Guarantee (SG) from 9 per cent to 12 per cent. In 30 years time the superannuation balances of men are projected to increase by 25 per cent. For women aged 45 to 54, the projected increase is 7 per cent, for women aged 55 to 64 it will be 22 per cent and for women aged 65 and over the estimated increase is 30 per cent.Availability: No items available

Eliciting Individual Preferences for Pension Reform /

by Fourati, Yosr Abid | Institute for the Study of Labor | O'Donoghue, Cathal.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: A 33-page discussion paper using data from a choice experiment to investigate individual preferences for an alternative state pension scheme based around preferences for cost, poverty, retirement age and pension parametersAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Environmental scan 2009. /

by Community Services and Health Industry Skills Council | Wise, Sarah | Oxenbridge, Sarah.

Publisher: Strawberry Hills, N.S.W. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations 2009Description: 55 p. : ill. col. + appendices.Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: 2009 may prove to be a pivotal year for the community services and health industries. 2008 saw major changes in the policy and economic environment on top of the demographic and social factors that continue to drive growth. The establishment of the Health Training Package HLT07 in 2007 and the Community Services Training Package CHC08 in 2008 has already made a significant contribution in responding to industry’s needs, providing a strong foundation for skills growth in the short and medium term. The Environmental Scan 2009 identifies areas of focus for skill growth through implementation and targeted extension of the Training Packages including through higher level competency standards, better articulation of skills across all levels and an improved interface between the vocational education and training (VET) and higher education sectors.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 2 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 4 of the HILDA survey /

by Headey, Bruce | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2007Description: vii, 133 p.Other title: Second Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Families, incomes and jobs, volume 3 : a statistical report on waves 1 to 5 of the HILDA survey /

by Headey, Bruce | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Warren, Diana.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2008Description: vi, 141 p. : ill.Other title: Third Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA) The HILDA Survey is funded by the Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Commenced in 2001, the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey is a nationally representative panel study of Australian households. The study is funded by the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and is managed by the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research at the University of Melbourne. Roy Morgan Research has conducted the fieldwork since Wave 9 (2009), prior to which The Nielsen Company was the fieldwork provider. This is the eighth volume of the Annual Statistical Report of the HILDA Survey, examining data from the first ten waves of the study, which were conducted between 2001 and 2010. ; The HILDA Survey seeks to provide longitudinal data on the lives of Australian residents. It annually collects information on a wide range of aspects of life in Australia, including household and family relationships, employment, education, income, expenditure, health and wellbeing, attitudes and values on a variety of subjects, and various life events and experiences. [Extract from Introduction]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Final report : dementia outcomes measurement suite project /

by Sansoni , Jan | University of Wollongong. Centre for Health Service evelopment | Marosszeky, Nick | Jeon, Yun-Hee | et al.

Publisher: Wollongong, N.S.W. University of Wollongong. Centre for Health Service Development. 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 433-507Summary: In May 2006 the Department of Health and Ageing commissioned a research report from the University of Wollongong on dementia measurement instruments. The aim of the project was to develop a credible suite of standardised measurement tools, within the health outcomes framework, to allow for the examination of service delivery effectiveness; better screening and assessment of consumers; and the evaluation of an individual consumer's health-related quality of life. The DOMS report identifies 36 instruments deemed suitable to be used by researchers and clinicians in the routine assessment, diagnosis, screening and outcomes monitoring of dementia conditions and the evaluation of treatments. Analysis was limited to tools available for use in routine care and therefore excluded detailed neuropsychological instruments that would require specialist training or interpretation. Standardisation of tools and terminologies is intended to advance research through the enhanced comparability of studies. The Report raises implementation issues including the issue of any mandating of particular instruments and training programs for the use of recommended instruments in particular settings. These issues require extensive consultation and discussion by health professionals. The Minister for Ageing's Dementia Advisory Group has been briefed on the DOMS report. The Group supports further consultation on the research findings with health professionals concerned with dementia assessment.Availability: (1)

From Angela?s Ashes to the Celtic Tiger : early life conditions and adult health in Ireland /

by Delaney, Liam | McGovern, Mark | Smith, James P.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2009Description: PDF.Notes: IZA DP No. 4548Summary: We use data from the Irish census and exploit regional and temporal variation in infant mortality rates over the 20th century to examine effects of early life conditions on later life health. Our main identification is public health interventions which eliminated the Irish urban infant mortality penalty. Estimates suggest that a unit decrease in mortality rates at time of birth reduces the probability of being disabled as an adult by between .03 and .05 percentage points. We find that individuals from lower socio economic groups had marginal effects of reduced infant mortality twice as large as those at the top.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Generational intelligence : a critical approach to age relations /

by Biggs, Simon | Lowenstein, Ariela.

Publisher: Abingdon, Oxon UK Routledge 2011Description: xiv, 180 p.Other title: Generational intelligence : age, identity, and the future of.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index. Contents: What is generational intelligence? -- Self and the generational imagination -- Generational self awareness -- Self and other -- Generational strategies and negotiation -- Generations and family -- Generational intelligence and caregiving : the family and the state -- Generational intelligence and elder mistreatment -- Workplace and intergenerational relations -- Intergenerational relations in the community Prof. Simon Biggs, Senior Manager, Research and Policy Centre, Brotherhood of St Laurence (2010- ) Professor of Gerontology and Social Policy University of MelbourneSummary: The question of communication and understanding between different generations is emerging as a key issue for the twenty-first century. The advent of ageing populations may lead to increased conflict or solidarity in society, and provokes a profound ambivalence both in public and in the private sphere. In a new approach, Biggs and Lowenstein offer a critical examination of Generational Intelligence as one way of addressing these issues. How easy is it to put yourself in the shoes of someone of a different age group? What are the personal, interpersonal and social factors that affect our perceptions of the 'age other'? What are the key issues facing families, workplaces and communities in an ageing society? This book sets out a way of thinking about interpersonal relations based on age, and the question of communication between people of different ages and generations. The book challenges existing orthodoxies for relations between adults of different ages and draws out steps that can be taken to increase understanding between generational groups. The authors outline a series of steps that can be taken to enhance Generational Intelligence, examine existing theories and social issues, and suggest new directions for sustainable relations between generational groups.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Good neighbours : measuring quality of life in older age /

by Watson, Jessica (ed.) | The International Longevity Centre UK | Sinclair, David (ed.).

Publisher: London, U.K. The International Longevity Centre 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2011 Bibliography : p. 13Summary: Increasing numbers of older people, higher expectations for 'a good life', and demands on health and social care services, have led to international interest in improving and measuring quality of life (QoL) in older age. Yet whilst QoL is a subjective concept, most attempts to measure it have been largely based on 'expert' opinions. As a result we may not have been measuring the right things when we review the QoL of older people. In addition, if the expert led measures of QoL don't measure the right things, policy makers may end up making the wrong policy interventions. Since 1999, research on QoL, which was funded by UK research councils, has allowed us to explore the potential for a new measure of QoL, based on the priorities of older people. Face-to-face interview surveys have explored older peoples' definitions of, and priorities for, QoL, and enabled the development of a measure of QoL based directly on their views.Availability: (1)

Growing old well : a life cycle approach for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People : inaugural National Workshop of the Australian Association of Gerontology, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing /

by Australian Association of Gerontology. Aboriginal and Torres trait Islander Ageing Committee.

Publisher: Loganholme, QLD Australian Association of Gerontology 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Association of Gerontology. Aboriginal and Torres.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 13 Includes separate appendices reportSummary: Through keynote presentations from four academics working in the area, to the sharing of a life story from an esteemed Aboriginal Elder activist, to the sharing of unique life experiences of all participants in smaller work groups, this workshop provided an opportunity for rich debate and dialogue with a number of recurring themes and recommendations related to Aboriginal ageing.Availability: (1)

Help wanted? : providing and paying for long-term care / OECD

by Colombo, Francesca | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development | Llena-Nozal, Ana | Mercier, J r me | Tjadens, Frits.

Publisher: Paris, France OECD Publishing 2011Description: 328 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Notes: Includes bibliographical references. Contents: Chapter 1. Long-term Care: Growing Sector, Multifaceted Systems -- Ch. 2. Sizing Up the Challenge Ahead: Future Demographic Trends and Long-term Care Costs -- Ch. 3. The Impact of Caring on Family Carers -- Ch. 4. Policies to Support Family Carers ?- Ch. 5. Long-Term Care Workers: Needed but Often Undervalued ?- Ch. 6. How to Prepare for the Future Long-term Care Workforce? ?- Ch. 7. Public Long-term Care Financing Arrangements in OECD Countries ?- Ch. 8. Private Long-term Care Insurance: A Niche or a 'Big Tent' ?- Ch. 9. Where To? Providing Fair Protection Against Long-term Care Costs and Financial Sustainability -- Ch. 10. Can We Get Better Value for Money in Long-term CareSummary: This book examines the challenges countries are facing with regard to providing and paying for long-term care. With populations ageing and the need for long-term care growing rapidly, this book looks at such issues as: future demographic trends, policies to support family carers, long-term care workers, financing arrangements, long-term care insurance, and getting better value for money in long-term care.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Home till when? : report on housing for elderly people in the southern region of Melbourne. /

by Wiles, Vivienne | Southern Regional Housing Council. Aged Persons Task Group.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Southern Regional Housing Council, Aged Persons Task Group 1986Description: 123 p. : tables.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 1986 Includes Bibliography. Includes appendices.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Housing costs and living standards among the elderly /

by Bradbury, Bruce | Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community services and Indigenous Affairs | Gubhaju, Bina.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Department 2010Description: viii., 71 p.: ill., graphs.Other title: Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 71Summary: This paper examines how the living standards of older Australians compare with those of the overall population, how much variation in living standards there is across the elderly population and how their living standards have changed over time. Home ownership, as an important aspect of the retirement support package in Australia, is also taken into consideration. The paper uses data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Household Expenditure Surveys from 1988-89 to 2003-04 and the ABS Surveys of Income and Housing from 2003-04 to 2007-08Availability: (1)

Housing transitions through the life course : aspirations, needs and policy /

by Beer, Andrew | Faulkner, Debbie | Clower, Terry | Paris, Chris.

Publisher: Bristol, U.K. Policy Press 2011Description: x, 198 p. : ill.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: The housing we live in shapes individual access to jobs, health, well being and communities. This book shows how lifetime attitudes to housing have changed, with the population dynamics driving the market and a greater emphasis on consumption. It also considers how the global financial crisis has differentially affected housing markets.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
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