Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Activation, retirement planning and restraining the 'third age'. /

by Mann, Kirk.

Publisher: 2007Availability: No items available

Choice or chance : late retirement in Finland. /

by Gould, Raija.

Publisher: 2006Availability: No items available

Entering the retirement zone : how much choice do individuals have? /

by Vickerstaff, Sarah.

Publisher: 2006Availability: No items available

Older Australians : a working future? : the ageing population and work in the 21st century

by Sheen, Veronica | Council on the Ageing (Australia) | Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA).

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Committee for Economic Development of Australia and Council on the Ageing (Australia) 2000Description: 31 p. : ill.Notes: "..paper by Veronica Sheen" p. 2 Special issue --cover Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Older workers : learning from three international experiences. /

by Riach, Kathleen.

Publisher: 2006Availability: No items available

Retire Later or Work Harder? /

by Bell, David N.F | Institute for the Study of Labor | Hart, Robert A.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). Discussion paper ;.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2010 Bibliography : p. 31-32Summary: We compare two policies of increasing British state pension provision: (a) increase the pensionable age of men and women, (b) maintain the existing retirement age but require older workers to work longer per-period hours. There are reasons for policy makers to give serious consideration to the under-researched alternative (b). First, from wage - hours contract theory we know that there are potential gains to both workers and firms of allowing hours to rise in work experience. Second, there is strong evidence that job satisfaction rises in age. Third, there has in any case been a significant overall increase in the hours supplied by older workers in the last two decades. We review the relevant theory, model the trade-off between later retirement versus increased work intensity, produce relevant background facts, and provide estimates of the policy trade-offs.Availability: (1)

Retirement effects of heavy job demands /

by Henseke, Golo.

Publisher: Rostock, Germany University of Rostock, Institute of Economics 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2011 Bibliography pp. 33-38Summary: This study focuses on the influence of heavy job demands on retirement, ; using the available SHARE waves. Heavy job demands may have a direct and health mediated effect on individual retirement. An econometric challenge is the dynamic self-selection of workers into jobs. The main findings indicate: the frequency of heavy job demands is higher among workers with low levels of socioeconomic status. Heavy job demands are associated with on average higher retirement probabilities, once workers become eligible to pension benefits. The effect is driven by long-term exposure to heavy job demands during the career. There are overall no retirement effects in the age bracket 50-58 and thus no indication for strong adverse health effects. A change in the level of current job demands does not influence the subsequent probability of retirementAvailability: (1)

Superannuation, social security and retirement income . /

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of the Parliamentary Library 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The impact of occupational pensions on retirement age. /

by Arkani, Sepideh | Gough, Orla.

Publisher: 2007Availability: No items available

The retirement expectations of middle-aged individuals . /

by Cobb-Clark, Deborah | Stillman, Steve.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian National University. Centre for Economic Policy Research 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://econrsss.anu.edu.au/pdf/DP540.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:35:58 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response Retirement & ageingAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The Standard Deviation of Life-Length, Retirement Incentives, and Optimal Pension Design /

by Aronsson, Thomas | Blomquist, Soren.

Publisher: Munich, Germany CESifo Group 2010Description: PDF.Other title: CESifo working paper ; no. 3201.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 23-24Summary: In this paper, we consider how the retirement age as well as a tax financed pension system ought to respond to a change in the standard deviation of the length of life. In a first best framework, where a benevolent government exercises perfect control over the individuals' labor supply and retirement-decisions, the results show that a decrease in the standard deviation of life-length leads to an increase in the optimal retirement age and vice versa, if the preferences for 'the number of years spent in retirement' are characterized by constant or decreasing absolute risk aversion. A similar result follows in a second best setting, where the government raises revenue via a proportional tax (or pension fee) to finance a lump-sum benefit per year spent in retirement. We consider two versions of this model, one with a mandatory retirement age decided upon by the government and the other where the retirement age is a private decision-variable.Availability: (1)

Who works beyond the 'standard' retirement age and why? /

by Ryan, Chris | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Sinning, Mathias.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 41-42Summary: With life expectancy increasing, and changes to public policy aimed at encouraging older workers to stay in the workforce, the conditions under which people decide to retire have changed in recent years. This report describes the characteristics of those who continue to work beyond the age of 65. The findings show that two groups of workers, in terms of their educational qualifications, are more likely to remain working-the most and least educated-while labour force participation of those with vocational qualifications declines.Availability: (1)

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