Brotherhood of St Laurence

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A socially sustainable housing system (Investigative Panel) /

by Berry, Mike | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Williams, Peter.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Investigative Panel on a socially sustainable housing system.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Project Number: 30637 URL contains: Final Report: No. 169: Investigative Panel on a socially sustainable housing system for AustraliaSummary: This project drew together a panel of experts from Australia and the UK to consider how a more socially sustainable housing system could be achieved in Australia. The panel observed that the current Australian housing system was poorly placed to deal with immediate and longer-term challenges. They noted that affordability was declining and housing supply was constrained. Meanwhile, the traditional public housing model and the private rental sector were failing to deliver adequate low-rent housing. The panel concluded that there are real constraints to creating a sustainable and desirable housing system due to current market failures and policy fragmentation. The current urban form remained problematic and further impacts from the global financial crisis (GFC) can be anticipated. There are also embedded inequalities in income and wealth which impact perversely upon housing outcomesAvailability: (1)

Commonwealth-State Housing Agreement national data reports 2002-03 : home purchase assistance /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2004Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)

Falling through the net? : a risk management model for home ownership schemes. /

by Grieve, Shane | Peter, Vasanthi | Ballard, John.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2005Description: PDF.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Home loan interest rates and repayments . /

by Makeham-Kirchner, Adrian | Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. arliamentary Library.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of the Parliamentary Library 2007Description: HTML.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aph.gov.au/library/pubs/BN/2007-08/08bn03.htm' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:43:37 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseSummary: This background note provides a resource on housing interest rate movements and their impact on Australian mortgage holders. Mortgage affordability and the ability to purchase a home has become a highly sensitive political issue in recent years.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Home ownership in Australia : data and trends. /

by Kryger, Tony | Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. arliamentary Library.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of the Parliamentary Library 2009Description: HTML.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aph.gov.au/library/pubs/rp/2008-09/09rp21.htm' Checked: 2/06/2009 11:32:10 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseSummary: "The purpose of this paper is to examine whether any changes have occurred in Australia s rate of home ownership, defined as the proportion of households who own or are purchasing their homes. Two main data sources are considered the Census of Population and Housing and the Survey of Income and Housing (SIH) both the responsibility of the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The paper also looks at home ownership from the perspective of age and household composition and discusses how changes in population composition have affected the rate of home ownership." -- Publisher websiteAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Housing stress or transport stress? Issues in Australian housing affordability /

by Vidyattama, Yogi | National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling | Tanton, Robert | Nepal, Binod.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. University of Canberra. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling 2011Description: PDF.Other title: NATSEM working paper ; no. 11/06.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011 Bibliography pp. 21-23Summary: Housing stress is usually measured on the basis of income and direct housing costs such as mortgage repayments and rents. One cost that is not included in calculations of housing stress, but which may be important, is the difference transport costs make. Especially in city areas, paying a premium for a house that is close to work may offset the additional transport costs incurred getting to work. So a measure of housing stress which includes transport costs may give a different picture of housing stress to a measure that ignores transport costs. In this paper, we argue that transport costs need to be taken into account in measuring housing stress not only in the capital cities but also outside capital cities. We find that in capital cities, bringing transport costs into a housing stress measure increases the number of both purchasers and renters in housing stress by 25 per cent, and it particularly affects households with children. However, we also find that the impact of transport cost is even greater outside capital cities.Availability: (1)

Mortgage Stress . /

by Kryger, Tony.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of the Parliamentary Library 2003Description: HTML.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aph.gov.au/library/pubs/rn/2003-04/04rn16.htm' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:17:44 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Rental affordability snapshot : April 2014 Greater Sydney and the Illawarra /

by Kemp, Byron | ANGLICARE Diocese of Sydney, Social Policy & Research Unit | Paleologos, Zoe | Bellamy, John.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Anglicare 2014Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2014 Includes bibliographic references pp. 48-50Summary: Anglicare Australia's member agencies again conducted a Rental Affordability Snapshot over a weekend in April 2014, with the aim of highlighting the difficulty in finding an affordable and appropriate rental property for low income households. As part of this national project, ANGLICARE Sydney examined more than 13,000 rental advertisements in Greater Sydney (including the Central Coast) and the Illawarra, over the weekend of the 5th April, using online and print media. The total number of listings has declined from over 14,000 properties in the 2013 Snapshot, but remains higher than the number in 2012 (more than 11,000 properties). Results were sorted into 17 smaller Statistical Areas for analysis and reporting purposes. The findings revealed that for many households, finding appropriate and affordable housing is almost impossible.Availability: (1)

Reverse mortgages and older people : growth factors and implications for retirement decisions /

by Bridge, Catherine | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Adams, Toni | Phibbs, Peter | Mathews, Mark | Kendig, Hal.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2011Description: HTML.Other title: Reverse mortgages and older people: growth factors and.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Project Number: 70512 URL contains: Positioning Paper: No. 123: Reverse mortgages and older people: growth factors and implications for retirement decisions Final Report: No. 146: Reverse mortgages and older people: growth factors and implications for retirement decisions Research and Policy Bulletin: Issue 136: Reverse mortgages and older people PDF of Final ReportSummary: This project determined the current state of the reverse mortgage market in Australia and the popularity and potential growth amongst older persons of reverse mortgages and home reversion schemes. It then looked to understand and assess their potential impact on retirement decisions and planning.Availability: (1)

Sustainable home ownership for low-income households /

by Eastgae, Jon.

Publisher: Fairfield, Vic. 99 Consulting 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The advantages and disadvantages of home ownership for low-moderate income households /

by Hulse, Kath | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Burke, Terry | Ralston, Liss | Stone, Wendy.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2010Description: PDF.Other title: The benefits and risks of home ownership for low-moderate.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Project Number: 50514 October 2010 URL contains: Positioning Paper: No. 120: The benefits and risks of home ownership: disaggregating the effects of household income Final Report: No. 154: The benefits and risks of home ownership for low-moderate income households Research and Policy Bulletin: Issue 149: What are the benefits and risks of home ownership for low-moderate income households?Summary: The study emanated from a concern that popular and political support for home ownership is such that critical questions about the degree to which all home owners realise the projected financial and non-financial benefits of home ownership are rarely asked. In particular, do low-moderate income households gain the same benefits as households on middle and higher incomes, and irrespective of where they buy, or are these benefits offset by additional financial risks, including high mortgage burdens, reduced ability to accumulate wealth, locational constraints, and having to sell at a loss if a household moves in the early years of purchase? The US sub-prime housing crisis and its broader implications for national and global financial systems has generated much more attention to the financial and non-financial risks associated with home ownership than previously. This study with its detailed analysis of the benefits and risks of home ownership for low-moderate income households has the capacity to inform housing policy in the post-global financial crisis context.Availability: (1)

The benefits and risks of home ownership : disaggregating the effects of household income /

by Hulse, Kath | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Burke, Terry.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2009Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute [AHURI]..Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This Positioning Paper is the first report from a project which seeks to add to the research evidence base on the financial and non-financial outcomes of home ownership for households. The overall aim of the project is thus to investigate whether, and to what extent, the benefits and risks of home ownership are experienced differentially by Australian households with different levels of income, in particular by lower income households (bottom 40%) compared to households in the middle-higher income range (highest 60%) The study centres on households who are already home owners, including those who have outstanding loans secured against their property (purchasers) and those who have not (outright owners).Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The great Australian dream - just a dream? : housing affordability trends for Australia and our largest 25 cities /

by Phillips, Ben | National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling 2011Description: PDF.Other title: AMP.NATSEM income and wealth report ; issue 29.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2011 Bibliography : p. 22Summary: Australian house prices have moved from being affordable to severely unaffordable in the last 10 years and it will take at least another 10 years of flat house prices coupled with income growth for houses to regain an affordable status. This is the key finding of the AMP.NATSEM Income and Wealth Report: The Great Australian Dream - Just a Dream? which examines housing affordability in Australia using two measures: housing stress, based on the proportion of income spent on housing costs like mortgage and rent; and the house price to household income ratio - the higher the ratio, the less affordable the housing. The report found median house prices grew 147 per cent to Availability: (1)

Transaction costs, deposit requirements and the attainment of homeownership . /

by Wood, Gavin | Watson, Richard | Flatau, Paul.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2004Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://mams.rmit.edu.au/x9bmsn56okgt1.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:28:20 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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