Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Child care and early education in Australia : the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children /

by Harrison, Linda J | Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Dept. of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2009Description: xii, 207 p. ; 30 cm.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Growing up in Australia : 2007 longitudinal study of Australian children research conference. /

by Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2007Description: HTML.Summary: LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF AUSTRALIAN CHILDREN (LSAC)Availability: No items available

Investing in our future : an evaluation of the national rollout of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) : final report to the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, August 2011 /

by Liddell, Max | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Barnett, Tony | Roost, Fatoumata Diallo | McEachran, Juliet.

Edition: 2nd ed.Publisher: [Fitzroy, Vic.] HIPPY Australia and Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: xii, 130 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2011 "A summary report from the national evaluation of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY)"; August 2011Summary: A national evaluation of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY), a combined home and centre-based early childhood enrichment program that supports parents in their role as their child's first teacher has found significant benefits for parents and children. The effectiveness of HIPPY was evaluated by means of a two-year, longitudinal, quasi-experimental research design that involved a comparison group drawn from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children using propensity score matching.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).

Little Australians : differences in early childhood development /

by Gong, Cathy | National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling | McNamara, Justine | Cassells, Rebecca.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling 2011Description: PDF.Other title: AMP.NATSEM income and wealth report : issue 28.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2011 Bibliography : p. 20Summary: Four to five year old Australian children that are read to frequently, are in financially stable families, safe neighbourhoods, live in the city, and are female, perform better than their peers when it comes to their development, according to the latest AMP.NATSEM Income and Wealth Report. The latest AMP.NATSEM Income and Wealth Report: Little Australians uses data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children to measure differences in the development of Australian children aged four to five in three different domains: physical health; social and emotional functioning; and learning and cognitive development and also provides an overall development measure which incorporates all three domains.Availability: (1)

Mothers and fathers with young children : paid employment, caring and wellbeing /

by Baxter, Jennifer | Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community ervices and Indigenous Affairs | Gray, Matthew | Alexander, Michael.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Department 2007Description: xii, 139 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 133-139) FaCSIA0224.07.03 July 2007Summary: The paper examines how the use of child care, the time parents spend with children, and parental wellbeing relate to parental employment. The analysis in this paper is based on Wave 1 of the Longitudinal Survey of Australian Children (LSAC) confidentialised unit record file.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The best start : supporting happy, healthy childhoods /

by Baxter, Jennifer | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Gray, Matthew | Hayes, Alan.

Publisher: Melbourne, Victoria Australian Institute of Family Studies 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 4Summary: To support the 2010 National Families Week, the Australian Institute of Family Studies has prepared this Facts Sheet about the role that families and communities play in giving children the best possible start to life.Availability: (1)

The impact of child support payments on the labour supply decisions of resident mothers /

by Taylor, Matthew | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Gray, Matthew.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Institute of Family Studies [AIFS]. Research paper.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010 This report uses data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) confidentialised unit record file. Bibliography : p. 20 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This report analyses the effect of receipt of child support payments on the labour supply of resident mothers. This is an important issue, given the role that paid employment plays in increasing the short- and long-term economic wellbeing of separated mothers. There appears to be no Australian research into this issue, and only a handful of international studies. The effect of receipt of child support on resident mothers, labour supply is estimated using data from an important new Australian data source, the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). LSAC is a nationally representative large-scale longitudinal survey of two cohorts of Australian children born in 1999-2000 and 2003-04. The first two waves of LSAC provide information on the child support payments received by resident mothers with at least one child under the age of 7 years. Given that the data used in this study were collected in 2004 and 2006, the estimates are for the Child Support Scheme that was in place prior to the reforms that arose from the recommendations of the Ministerial Taskforce on Child Support, which were fully implemented in July 2008. Economic theory suggests that receipt of non-labour market income (such as child support or income support payments) will reduce the labour force participation of mothers (both the probability of being employed and, where they are already employed, the number of hours worked). This is termed the 'income effect' and occurs because the mother is able to achieve the same level of consumption for fewer hours worked than they would in the absence of these payments. ; LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF AUSTRALIAN CHILDREN (LSAC)Availability: (1)

The labour market ate my babies : work, children and a sustainable future. /

by Pocock, Barbara.

Publisher: Leichhardt, N.S.W. Federation Press 2006Description: x, 244 p.Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 230-238) and index. Family & early yearsSummary: The author argues that modern working life has considerable impact on Australian youth and on the capacity of parents to care for them. New policy approaches to work and to child-care are needed to support and sustain those who work if they and their children are not to suffer.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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