Brotherhood of St Laurence

Your search returned 210 results.

Not what you expected? Check for suggestions
'Kicking into the wind' : longitudinal study of outcomes for families who have experienced homelessness : second report. /

by Kolar, Violet.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Hanover Welfare Services 2003Description: vi, [2], 82 p. + appendices.Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 82) May 2003 see also: Home first : a longitudinal study of outcomes for families who have experienced homelessness : final report (B12087) Family & early yearsAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

2nd seniors sentiment index /

by National Seniors Australia and Challenger.

Publisher: Brisbane, Qld. National Seniors Australia 2014Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2014Summary: This report details findings from the second Seniors Sentiment Index. The Index is a summary measure of how senior Australians view different aspects of their lives, as well as Australian society as a whole. Specifically, the Index is based on seniors? assessment of their financial, health and social wellbeing, both presently and how they foresee these areas will be in the future.Availability: (1)

3D poverty : "Poverty and social exclusion mean much more than low income" /

by Sodha, Sonia | DEMOS | Bradley, William.

Publisher: London DEMOS 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: With an appendix by Gareth Morrell, Matt Barnes and Debbie Collins, National Centre for Social Research. December 2010 Bibliography : p. 135-141Summary: Poverty measurement is almost by definition controversial: there is no single, universally accepted definition of poverty. Poverty, its drivers and its consequences are defined and talked about differently by different political traditions at different times. The way we measure poverty, deprivation and social exclusion has been the focus of innovative work, but in the UK we still overwhelmingly focus on poverty as measured by income. 3D Poverty does not suggest that the standard definition of income poverty as 60 per cent of the median income should be dropped. Its simplicity brings the benefits of relative transparency and easy application. However, it is not enough to just measure income poverty: there is the need for an annual, multi-dimensional analysis of poverty and social exclusion. This measure would track annually the depth of deprivation in the UK at a household level, and the overlap and interaction between different dimensions of disadvantage. This pamphlet contains a detailed methodology as to how that measure would work.Availability: (1)

A review of the early childhood literature /

by Centre for Community Child Health.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. AusInfo 2000Description: iv, 39 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2000 Includes bibliographical references Prepared for the Department of Family and Community Services as a background paper for the National Families Strategy.Availability: (1)
Lists:

A safe and supportive family environment for children : key components and links to child outcomes /

by Mullan, Killian | Australia. Department of Social Services | Higgins, Daryl.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of Social Services 2014Description: PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Bibliography : p. 72-77Summary: While most children live in safe and supportive environments, governments are aware that too many children are becoming known to child protection services. This has led to a shift in thinking away from solely concentrating on responding to 'risk of harm' reports towards a broader public health approach to protecting all of Australia's children, reducing the likelihood of children coming to the attention of statutory authorities. This report aims to understand more about the prevalence of different types of family environments in society and to explore the influence of these environments on different child outcomes. Using data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, we used latent class cluster analysis to identify different family environments and analysed the associations between these environments and particular child outcomes.Availability: (1)

Ageing across Europe /

by DEMOS.

Publisher: Cardiff WRVS (Wales) 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2012 Report prepared by DEMOS for WRVS Bibliography : p. 136-142Summary: Many European countries, including the UK, are now facing the dual challenge of responding to the demographic changes brought by population ageing, while also implementing tough austerity measures following the 2008 financial and economic crisis. With increasing pressure on public budgets, this is an important moment to consider what it is that makes a country a good place to grow old, and where possible to learn lessons from our European neighbours on the policies and services that are most effective in giving older people a good quality of life. This new evidence will contribute to a national debate in the UK about our aspirations for our older citizens and how we might best achieve them in an increasingly challenging fiscal environmentAvailability: (1)

Ageing and skills : a review and analysis of skill gain and skill loss over the lifespan and over time /

by Desjardins, Richard | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development | Warnke, Arne Jonas.

Publisher: OECD Publishing 2012Description: PDF.Other title: OECD education working paper ; no. 72.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: EDU/WKP(2012)9 27-Mar-2012 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: The relationship between ageing and skills is becoming an important policy issue, not least in the context of population ageing. Data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) will potentially add considerably to the understanding of the relationship between ageing and foundation skills. In particular, the fact that data from the 1994-1998 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) and the 2003-2007 Adult Literacy and Lifeskills Survey (ALL) will be linked with PIAAC offers a unique opportunity to examine trends over time at the cohort level for a wide range of countries. Specifically, repeated measures will enable an analysis of whether there is skill gain and skill loss over the lifespan of cohorts and overtime between cohorts. This is especially important because age-skill profiles observed on the basis of a single cross-section are difficult to interpret. With this as a backdrop, this paper has sought to provide an overview of what is known about age-skill profiles and to conduct an analysis that demonstrates how trend data based on repeated cross-sectional observations of direct measures of skill at the cohort level can be used to estimate skill gain and skill loss over the lifespan and over time.Availability: (1)

Annual leave in Australia : an analysis of entitlement, usage and preferences. /

by Denniss, R.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Australia Institute 2003Notes: July 2002 Bibliography: p. 29-31Availability: No items available

Annual transitions between labour market states for young Australians /

by Buddelmeyer, Hielke | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Marks, Gary.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 35 INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Having a choice of transition pathways from school to work, further education or training gives young people the best chance of success. Using the 1995 cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth, this study looks at the role post-school qualifications play in the year-by-year movement between labour market states by young people. Higher post-school qualifications are found to increase the chances of being permanently employed and provide protection against being persistently unemployed or out of the labour force.Availability: (1)

Are older workers worthy of their pay? : an empirical investigation of age-productivity and age-wage nexuses /

by Rute Cardoso, Ana | Institute for the Study of Labor | Guimaraes, Paulo | Varejao, Jose.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA). Discussion paper ;.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2010 Bibliography : p. 16-17 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: Using longitudinal employer-employee data spanning over a 22-year period, we compare age-wage and age-productivity profiles and find that productivity increases until the age range of 50-54, whereas wages peak around the age 40-44. At younger ages, wages increase in line with productivity gains but as prime-age approaches, wage increases lag behind productivity gains. As a result, older workers are, in fact, worthy of their pay, in the sense that their contribution to firm-level productivity exceeds their contribution to the wage bill. On the methodological side, we note that failure to account for the endogenous nature of the regressors in the estimation of the wage and productivity equations biases the results towards a pattern consistent with underpayment followed by overpayment type of policies.Availability: (1)

Assessing the value of additional years of schooling for the non-academically inclined . /

by Dockery, Alfred Michael.

Publisher: Camberwell, Vic. Australian Council for Educational Research 2005Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.acer.edu.au/research/projects/lsay/reports/lsay38.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:28:37 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Attitudes towards pensions and retirement at age 50 : initial results from the National Child Development Study /

by Brown, Matthew | University of London. Institute of Education. Centre for ongitudinal Studies.

Publisher: London, U.K. Centre for Longitudinal Studies 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2010 CLS cohort studies working paper 2010/2 Includes bibliographic referencesSummary: This paper uses data collected from members of the National Child Development Study at age 50 to examine the attitudes that British 50 year olds have towards retirement and in particular the concerns they might have about their future financial situation and whether they might be considering working beyond retirement age. By the age of 50 only a small minority (around 1 per cent) of study members had retired but over the next 10 to 15 years a great many of them will be making the transition from work to retirement.Availability: (1)

Attitudes, intentions and participation /

by Khoo, Siek Toon | Ainley, John.

Publisher: Camberwell, Vic. Australian Council for Educational Research 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Report examines the relationship between students' attitudes to school participation in education and training, and the influence of these attitudes on participation in Year 12 and in further education and training in the context of earlier school achievement, social background, geographic location, language background and gender.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Australia's migration program /

by Phillips, Janet | Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. arliamentary Library.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Parliament. Department of Parliamentary Services 2005Description: PDF.Other title: Australia. Parliament. Department of Parliamentary Services..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 10 May 2005Summary: This Research Note will look at Australia's migration program patterns since 1945, including shifts in numbers and focus, and touch on some of the initiatives that have been introduced recently specifically to address labour market concerns.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Australia's migration program /

by Spinks, Harriet | Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. arliamentary Library.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. Parliamentary Library 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Australia. Parliament. Department of Parliamentary Services..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 8 October 2010 Includes bibliographical references.Summary: This Background Note will look at Australia's Migration Program patterns since 1945, including shifts in numbers and focus, and outline some of the recent changes that have been made specifically to address labour market concerns. Appendix A provides a chronology of changes to the Migration Program made by the Rudd Labor Government. Migration Program statistics from 1984-85 through to 2010-11 are provided at Appendix B.Availability: (1)

Australian Temperament Project. /

by Australian Institute of Family Studies. Australian Temperament Project.

Publisher: Melbourne Australian Institute of Family Studies 2006Online Access: website Notes: Description based on contents viewed : 23 May 2006 Mode of access : WORLD WIDE WEB ONLINE RESOURCESummary: The Australian Temperament Project (ATP) is a longitudinal study of the psychosocial development of a large and representative sample of Australian children born in the state of Victoria, Australia between September 1982 and January 1983. The study aims to trace the pathways to psychosocial adjustment and maladjustment across the lifespan, and to investigate the contribution of personal, family and environmental factors to development and wellbeing. A major theme throughout has been the influence of an individual's temperament on his/her emotional and behavioural adjustment. The broad issues addressed include: > >the contribution of temperament to a child's emotional, behavioural and school adjustment; > >the impact of family and environmental factors, together with child characteristics, on emotional and behavioural adjustment; > >the factors and processes involved in the progression of childhood behaviour problems (e.g. aggression, hyperactivity, anxiety) to adolescent and adult adjustment difficulties (e.g. antisocial behaviour, substance use, depression); > >genetic influences on temperament and behaviour; > >the development of healthy, socially competent functioning; > >the development of civic mindedness and social responsibility; > >the transition to young adulthood: pathways to occupational and educational participation, the development of interpersonal relationships, and family formation.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Better skills, better jobs, better lives : a strategic approach to skills policies /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: OECD Publishing 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 58-62Summary: Skills transform lives and drive economies. Without adequate investment in skills, people languish on the margins of society, technological progress does not translate into economic growth, and countries can no longer compete in an increasingly knowledge-based global society. People with poor skills face a much greater risk of experiencing economic disadvantage, and a higher likelihood of unemployment and dependency on social benefits. ; The OECD Skills Strategy provides a strategic framework to help countries understand more about how to invest in skills in a way that will transform lives and drive economies. It will help countries to identify the strengths and weaknesses of their existing national skills pool and skills systems, benchmark them internationally, and develop policies for improvement. In particular, the strategy provides the foundations upon which governments can work effectively with all interested parties - national, local and regional government, employers, employees, and learners.Availability: (1)

Beyond unemployment : the realistic job prospects of disadvantaged workers. /

by Macdonald, Fiona | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic.Paper presented at fifth National Conference on Unemployment, RMIT University, 1st & 2nd October 1998 1998Description: 8 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Lists:

Blue collared : the shrinking world of work in Tasmania /

by Madden, Kelly | Anglicare Tasmania.

Publisher: Hobart, Tas. Anglicare Tasmania 2003Description: 95 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2003 Summary: The qualitative component of this research indicates that unemployed people had a strong preference for permanent employment, placing a very high value on the paid entitlements and sense of security. Many of the participants had extensive experience of casual work but this had not led to more permanent employment. This research indicates that the distinct categories of ‘unemployed’ and ‘casual worker’ which emerge from static accounts of the labour market would be much more accurately conceptualised as a cycle, with a sub-group of people moving between casual work and unemployment on a very regular basis.Availability: (1)

Hosted by Prosentient