Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Early health related behaviours and their impact on later life chances : evidence from the US. /

by Burgess, Simon M | Propper, Carol.

Publisher: London, U.K. Centre for Analysis for Social Exclusion 1998Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 1998Availability: (1)
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Fiscal costs of climate mitigation programmes in the UK : a challenge for social policy? /

by Marden, Sam | London School of Economics. Centre for Analysis of Social xclusion | Gough, Ian.

Publisher: London, U.K. London School of Economics. Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion. 2011Description: PDF.Other title: CASEreport ; no. 145.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011 Bibliography pp. 29-30Summary: This paper asks whether the policies and programmes enacted to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the UK will compete with other goals of public policy, in particular social policy goals. The Climate Change Act 2008 has set the UK some of the most demanding targets in the world: to reduce GHG emissions (compared with 1990) by at least 80% by 2050 and by at least 34% by 2020 - just nine years away. A wide array of climate change mitigation policies (CCMPs) have been put in place to bring this about. Will these compete fiscally with the large public expenditures on the welfare state? We address this question by surveying and costing all UK government policies that have a climate change mitigation objective and which are expressed through taxation, government expenditures and government-mandated expenditures by energy suppliers and other businesses and which are directed toward the household sector. Our conclusion is that expenditures on CCMPs are tiny - around one quarter of one per cent of GDP - and will not rise significantly. Within this the share of direct spending by government will fall and that obligated on utility companies will rise. Green taxes are also planned to fall as a share of GDP. There is no evidence here of fiscal competition between the welfare state and the environmental state. However, the use of mandated electricity and gas markets will impose rising costs on the household sector, which will bear more heavily on lower income households and will increase "fuel poverty". Thus demands on traditional social policies are likely to rise. More radical policy reforms will be needed to integrate climate change and social policy goals.Availability: (1)

How effective is the British government's attempt to reduce child poverty? /

by Piachaud, David | Sutherland, Holly.

Publisher: London, U.K.Website: http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/Case/38 2000Description: 47 leaves.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)

Maternity leave policies and women's employment after childbirth : evidence from the United States, Britain and Japan. /

by Waldfogel, Jane | Higuchi, Yoshio | Abe, Masahiro.

Publisher: London, U.K. Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics 1998Description: 24 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: URL: 'http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/publications/casepapers.asp' Checked: 2/03/2009 9:39:33 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: (1)

Measuring income mobility with dirty data . /

by Cowell, Frank A | Schluter, Christian.

Publisher: London, U.K. Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics 1998Description: HTML.Notes: URL: 'http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/publications/casepapers.asp' Checked: 2/03/2009 9:39:30 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Persistent poverty and lifetime inequality : the evidence /

by London School of Economics. Centre for Analysis of Social xclusion.

Publisher: London, U.K. Centre for Analysis for Social Exclusion 1999Description: 138 p.Other title: CASEreport ; 5.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 1998 Proceedings from a workshop held at H M Treasury, chaired by Professor John HillsAvailability: (1)

Poverty, social exclusion and neighbourhood : studying the area bases of social exclusion. /

by Glennerster, Howard | Lupton, Ruth | Noden, Philip | Power, Anne.

Publisher: London, U.K.Website : http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/Case/22 1999Description: 45 leaves.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)

Schools, education and social exclusion. /

by Sparkes, Jo.

Publisher: London, U.K.http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/publications/casepaper.asp 1999Description: iii, 38 leaves.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: URL: 'http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/publications/casepapers.asp' Checked: 2/03/2009 9:39:38 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: (1)

Social exclusion, social isolation and the distribution of income . /

by Barry, Brian.

Publisher: London, U.K. Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion London School of Economics 1998Description: iv, 24 leaves.Notes: URL: 'http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/publications/casepapers.asp' Checked: 2/03/2009 9:39:40 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Tax relief and partnership pensions . /

by Le Grand, Julien | Agulnik, Phil.

Publisher: London, U.K. Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics 1999Description: 35 p.Notes: URL: 'http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/publications/casepapers.asp' Checked: 2/03/2009 9:39:33 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The class of '81 : the effects of early-career unemployment on subsequent unemployment experiences. /

by Burgess, Simon | Propper, Carol | Rees, Hedley | Shearer, Arran.

Publisher: London, U.K. London School of Economics 1999Description: 27 p.Notes: URL: 'http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/publications/casepapers.asp' Checked: 2/03/2009 9:39:41 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The decline of employment among older people in Britain. /

by Campbell, Nigel.

Publisher: London, U.K. Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, London School of Economics 1999Description: v, 75 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Older men have experienced the largest falls in employment over the last twenty years. Two-fifths of men aged between 55 and 65 are without work, compared to one-fifth in 1979, equivalent to 600,000 fewer jobs. Older women have not shared in the general rise of female employment. This paper analyses the Labour Force Survey and the first six waves of the British Household Panel Survey to examine why older people's employment has fallen, which groups have been most affected, and whether these trends are likely to continue. The people most likely to leave the labour market are either (a) in the bottom quartile of the wage distribution or (b) with wages in the top half but who are also members of an occupational pension scheme. Once displaced, few older people return to work. There are instead significant transitions between unemployment, long-term sickness and retirement, almost always weakening attachment to the labour market. Furthermore, falling male employment seems to be part of an ongoing trend, rather than simply affecting one unfortunate generation.Availability: (1)

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