Brotherhood of St Laurence

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"Not for export" : why the international community should reject Australia's refugee policies. /

by Human Rights Watch.

Publisher: Washington, DC Human Rights Watch 2002Description: HTML.Notes: URL: 'http://www.hrw.org/press/2002/09/ausbrf0926.htm' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:19:18 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

2009 global trends : refugees, asylum-seekers, returnees, internally displaced and stateless persons /

by United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Publisher: Geneva, Switzerland United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 15 June 2010Summary: The 2009 Global Trends report reviews statistical trends and patterns in populations considered to be of concern to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). This can include refugees, returnees, stateless persons and certain internally displaced persons (IDPs) collectively referred to as "persons of concern". In doing so, the report describes some of the major humanitarian developments that occurred in 2009, many of them leading to involuntary movements of millions of people, both within and across borders.Availability: (1)

2010 global trends : 2010 in review /

by United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Publisher: Geneva, Switzerland United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: As UNHCR commemorates in 2011 the 60th anniversary of the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and the 50th anniversary of the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness, the 2010 Global Trends report demonstrates the continued relevance of forced displacement and statelessness issues to the international agenda. It depicts some of the major humanitarian trends which occurred during 2010 in relation to displacement, either within or beyond international borders. The report also reviews statistical trends and patterns for populations considered to be of concern to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) - refugees, returnees, stateless persons and internally displaced persons (IDPs) - collectively referred to as "persons of concern".Availability: (1)

A last resort? : national inquiry into children in immigration detention [summary guide]/

by Australia. Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission 2004Description: 72 p.Online Access: Electronic Copy Notes: April 2004Availability: Electronic Copy (1)

A last resort? : national inquiry into children in immigration detention /

by Australia. Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission 2004Description: 925 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Contents: Preface -- Executive summary -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Inquiry methodology -- 3. Setting the scene : children in immigration detention -- 4. Australia's human rights obligations -- 5. Mechanisms to protect the human rights of children in immigration detention -- 6. Australia's immigration detention policy and practice -- 7. Refugee status determination for children in immigration detention -- 8. Safety in immigration detention -- 9. Mental health of children in immigration detention -- 10. Physical health of children in immigration detention -- 11. Children with disabilities in immigration detention -- 12. Education for children in immigration detention -- 13. Recreation for children in immigration detention -- 14. Unaccompanied children in immigration detention -- 15. Religion, culture and language for children in immigration detention -- 16. Temporary Protection Visas for children released from immigration detention -- 17. Major findings and recommendations of the Inquiry -- Appendices April 2004Availability: (1)

Asylum seekers : there has to be a better way. /

by Jupp, James.

Publisher: 2001Summary: In this article Dr. James Jupp, Director of the Centre for Immigration and Multicultural Studies at the Australian National University, talks about the damage done to Australia's international reputation as a country which takes its humanitarian responsibility seriously, by the way the Howard Government has handled the asylum seekers who have arrived at our shores since 2000.Availability: No items available

Back to basics : the right to liberty and security of person and 'alternatives to detention' of refugees, asylum-seekers, stateless persons and other migrants /

by Edwards, Alice | United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Publisher: Geneva, Switzerland United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2011Summary: The widespread and growing use of immigration detention has come under considerable scrutiny in recent years on pragmatic (practical and functional) as well as human rights/legal grounds. This study articulates the current state of international law governing detention and its alternatives, and provides a critical overview of existing and possible alternatives to detention (A2Ds) options drawn from empirical research. Research visits were conducted to five countries, namely Australia, Belgium, Canada, Hong Kong, and the United Kingdom. This study contributes to the body of work of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) against the detention of refugees, asylum-seekers and stateless persons, and forms one of the background papers for the global roundtable on the same subject.Availability: (1)

BSL submission to the Expert Panel on Asylum Seekers /

by Houston, Angus | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Aristotle, Paris | L'Estrange, Michael.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2012Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence recommends the following essentials to a solution: a) Accessible and timely processing of asylum claims through a strong and coordinated regional framework , in accordance with the Refugees Convention and Protocol ; whether in Australia or in transit countries in the region. Guaranteed resettlement to a refugee receiving country that is time-bound, requiring a significant increase in refugee settlement places in Australia and elsewhere to avoid refugees left languishing for years in the region. Ability to live/ earn/ not be detained during processing ; whether in Australia or in transit countries in the region; in line with UNHCR Guidelines. Strong enough functioning of the above three points so it is not a 'pull' to get on a boat as the only solution (this is compared with deterrence solutions that punish refugees). Multi-dimensional solutions that that go beyond essential border management l or countersmuggling and represent a genuine regional cooperation and re-settlement framework.Availability: (1)

Children's rights : equal rights? : diversity, difference and the issue of discrimination. /

by International Save the Children Alliance.

Publisher: London, U.K. International Save the Children Alliance 2000Description: vii, 226 p. : ill.Notes: November 2000Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Complementary Protection for Asylum Seekers /

by Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. arliamentary Library.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Parliament of Australia. Parliamentary Library 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: A 72-page Australian research paper providing an overview of the international and Australian legal frameworks for complementary protection of asylum seekersAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Displacement : the new 21st century challenge /

by United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

Publisher: Geneva, Switzerland United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees 2012Description: PDF.Other title: UNHCR global trends 2012.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)

Financing adaptation : why the UN s Bali Climate Conference must mandate the search for new funds. /

by Sterrett, Charlotte.

Publisher: Oxfam Australia 2007Description: PDF.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Human development report 2009 : overcoming barriers : human mobility and development /

by United Nations Development Programme.

Publisher: Basingstoke, U.K. Palgrave Macmillan 2009Description: xii, 217 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Published for the United Nations Development Programme. Includes bibliographical references and statistical annex Contents : How and why people move -- Barriers to movement -- The case for mobility -- Our proposal -- The way forward -- Freedom and movement : how mobility can foster human development -- Mobility matters -- Choice and context : understanding why people move -- Development, freedom and human mobility -- What we bring to the table -- People in motion : who moves where, when and why -- Human movement today -- Looking back -- Policies and movement -- Looking ahead : the crisis and beyond -- How movers fare -- Incomes and livelihoods -- Health -- Education -- Empowerment, civic rights and participation -- Understanding outcomes from negative drivers -- Overall impacts -- Impacts at origin and destination -- Impacts at places of origin -- Destination place effects -- Policies to enhance human development outcomes -- The core package -- The political feasibility of reform -- conclusions.Summary: Human development is about putting people at the centre of development. It is about people realizing their potential, increasing their choices and enjoying the freedom to lead lives they value. Since 1990, annual Human Development Reports have explored challenges including poverty, gender, democracy, human rights, cultural liberty, globalization, water scarcity and climate change. Migration, both within and beyond borders, has become an increasingly prominent theme in domestic and international debates, and is the topic of the 2009 Human Development Report. The starting point is that the global distribution of capabilities is extraordinarily unequal, and that this is a major driver for movement of people. Migration can expand their choices 'in terms of incomes, accessing services and participation, for example' but the opportunities open to people vary from those who are best endowed to those with limited skills and assets. These underlying inequalities, which can be compounded by policy distortions, is a theme of the report. The report investigates migration in the context of demographic changes and trends in both growth and inequality. It also presents more detailed and nuanced individual, family and village experiences, and explores less visible movements typically pursued by disadvantaged groups such as short term and seasonal migration.Availability: (1)

Human rights : Australia versus the UN. /

by Charlesworth, Hilary.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Democratic Audit of Australia. Australian National University 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://democratic.audit.anu.edu.au/papers/20060809_charlesworth_aust_un.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:30:19 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Obama's New Climate Policy : Opportunities and Challenges of Climate Policy Change in the US /

by Mildner, Stormy-Annika | Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik | Richert, Jorn.

Publisher: Berlin Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (SWP) research paper.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2010 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Hopes of fresh momentum in the international climate negotiations were high when Barack Obama was elected president of the United States on November 4, 2008. Even during the election campaign, he had announced plans to reduce US greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050, to increase the percentage of renewable energies in the energy mix 25 percent by 2025, and to set up a national emissions trading system. It seemed then that 2009 would be a banner year for climate protection in the US: not only did the House of Representatives pass a comprehensive climate bill in June, the EPA and the Department of Transportation also issued a number of new regulations. The US also returned to the table to join serious multilateral negotiations on the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. But after the initial euphoria had subsided, disappointment over the Obama administration's climate policy soon set in. There is disagreement among the parties negotiating the new climate agreement - not just on carbon reduction targets, but also on its basic form. The Europeans and the developing countries adhere to the idea of a binding international treaty. The United States, on the other hand, prefers climate goals that conform to national legislation. It is therefore unsurprising that the negotiating partners at the Copenhagen Summit in December 2009 were unable to agree on a concrete statement of intent. The key questions of this study are: What explains Washington's behavior in the international climate negotiations? What are the chances of real change in US climate policy? The main focus is on the driving forces behind domestic climate policy.Availability: (1)

Responding to protracted refugee situations : lessons from a decade of discussion /

by Milner, James | University of Oxford. Oxford Department of International evelopment. Refugee Studies Centre | Loescher, Gil.

Publisher: Oxford, U.K. University of Oxford. Refugee Studies Centre 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Refugee Studies Centre. Forced Migration Policy briefing ;.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2011Summary: Building on a decade of discussion between actors within the refugee policy, research and advocacy communities, it is important to understand how the 2009 ExCom Conclusion can be used to get greater engagement from the broader range of actors required to respond to PRS effectively. To this end, the purpose of this policy brief is to examine in detail the history and process of identifying PRS as a significant international policy problem, the steps leading to the 2009 ExCom Conclusion and a consideration of the text of the Conclusion. For many years, broader discussions on PRS were eclipsed by a series of refugee emergencies and other pressing international security concerns of states. It is only recently that PRS have been recognised as a pressing international issue deserving both immediate and long-term consideration. The negotiations which led to the 2009ExCom Conclusion built on a decade of policy development and research on the causes, consequences and possible responses to PRS. This work argued that the scale and dimensions of the problem of PRS demand an urgent global response.Availability: (1)

Reworking the relationship between asylum and employment /

by Mathew, Penelope.

Publisher: London, U.K. Routledge 2012Description: xi, 214 p. ; 24 cm.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index.Summary: Touching on the laws and practices of a wide array of countries around the globe, this book examines the extent to which refugees and asylum-seekers' right to work is protected by international human rights law. The book examines a number of key international treaties, national constitutions and some foundational cases from national courts in order to make the case that the practice of restricting refugees and asylum-seekers access to the labour market is illegal. In so doing, the author examines some intricate legal questions, such as the interpretation of the Refugee Convention's provisions restricting rights to refugees 'lawfully staying', the application of racial discrimination to citizenship distinctions, and the ways in which limitations on human rights are applicable in this context. The book also looks at some broader philosophical questions such as the meaning of equality and human dignity, and the legitimacy of the right to work. The book goes on to explore broader debates concerning migration and 'open borders' in order to unpack the fears that drive many countries' restrictive measures. Readers are invited to consider whether the world would be a better place with more freedom of movement. It is a unique stand-alone treatment of the subject and includes the Michigan Guidelines on the Right to Work.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Submission to the United Nations study on human rights compliance while countering terrorism (Australia) . /

by Lynch, Andrew | University of New South Wales | Saul, Ben | Williams, George.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law, University of New South Wales 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.gtcentre.unsw.edu.au/news/docs/submissionUNHumanRights.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:23:43 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseSummary: The authors respond to the main issues covered by the UN study of Australia's counter-terrorism legislation and measures in a question and answer format.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The community guide to the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples /

by Australian Human Rights Commission.

Publisher: [Sydney, N.S.W.] Australian Human Rights Commission 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This guide is designed to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to learn about the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (referred to in this guide as 'the Declaration'). It will help you to become familiar with the Declaration and to discover how the rights outlined in it can be used.Availability: (1)

U.S. global climate change policy : evolving views on cost, competitiveness, and comprehensiveness /

by Parker, Larry | United States. Congressional Research Service | Blodgett, John | Yacobucci, Brent D.

Publisher: Washington, DC United States. Congressional Research Service 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 25, 2010Summary: The nature of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (particularly carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions) makes their control difficult to integrate with the U.S economy and traditional U.S. energy policy. Despite the obvious interrelationship between energy policy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the United States has struggled to integrate the two. For a country that has traditionally used its relatively cheap supply of energy to substitute for more expensive labor and capital costs to compete internationally, this linkage is particularly strong, as witnessed by the nation?s high GHG emissions per capita. In the face of this economic reality, along with continuing scientific uncertainty, debate over a greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction program can be categorized by three inter-related Cs: Cost, Competitiveness, and Comprehensiveness.Availability: (1)

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