Brotherhood of St Laurence

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A carrot and a big stick : understanding private health insurance and older Australians /

by Temple, Jeromey | National Seniors Productive Ageing Centre | Adair, Tim.

Publisher: Braddon, A.C.T. National Seniors Productive Ageing Centre 2011Description: PDF.Other title: NSPAC research monograph ; no. 1.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2011 Bibliography pp. 36-38 Appendices pp. 39-46Summary: Healthy and productive ageing rests considerably upon timely and affordable access to health care. In the near future, expenditure on health care is expected to rise as population ageing places heavier demands on the public health care system. The Federal Treasury projects government expenditure on health care on those aged 65 and over is to increase seven-fold from 2010 to 2050, and 12-fold for the over 85 age group over the same period. To alleviate pressure from the public health care system, from the late 1990s the then Howard government introduced key reforms to the private health insurance sector, which sought to encourage Australians of all ages to purchase private health insurance. These reforms are colloquially referred to as 'carrots' and 'sticks': those that provide incentives to purchase, and disincentives not to purchase, private health insurance. This intervention was considered necessary because over time there had been an ongoing decrease in the number of younger, healthier persons with health insurance relative to older persons and those with more complex needs - a process health economists term as an adverse selection spiral.Availability: (1)

Ancillary and specialist health services : does low income limit access? /

by Schofield, Deborah.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling, University of Canberra 1997Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 1997 Includes bibliographical references. At head of title: NATSEMAvailability: (1)

Can we design a market for competitive health insurance ? /

by Hall, Jane.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Centre for Health Economics Research and Evaluation, University of Technology Sydney 2004Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.chere.uts.edu.au/pdf/dp53.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:17:56 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Comparison of the uptake of health assessment items for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians : implications for policy. /

by Kelaher, Margaret | Dunt, David | Anderson, Ian P.

Publisher: Bundoora, Vic.Australia and New Zealand Health Policy [electronic resource] ; 2005 2:14 2005Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.anzhealthpolicy.com/content/pdf/1743-8462-2-21.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:25:35 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Economic insecurity /

by Osberg, Lars.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 1998Description: 54 p.Notes: Includes bibliographical references October 1998Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

International Profiles of Health Care Systems : Australia, Canada, Denmark, England, France, Germany, /

by The Commonwealth Fund.

Publisher: New York The Commonwealth Fund 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2010Summary: This publication presents overviews of the health care systems of 13 countries : Australia, Canada, Denmark, England, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. A summary table presents information on population, health care spending, number of physicians, hospital spending and utilization, use of health information technology, and number of potentially avoidable deaths. Each country summary provides information on insurance coverage and benefits, health system financing, delivery system organization, quality assurance mechanisms, efforts to improve efficiency and control costs, and recent innovations and reforms.Availability: (1)

Managed competition in health care : workshop proceedings /

by Australia. Productivity Commission.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. AusInfo 2002Description: xvii, 97 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2002 Includes bibliographical references Workshop proceedings held in Canberra, 23 August 2002.Availability: (1)

Modelling the coverage of private health insurance in Australia in 1995. /

by Percival, Richard | Schofield, Deborah | Fischer, Simon.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling. University of Canberra 1997Description: v, 37 p.Notes: May 1997Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Pharmaceutical markets and social responsibility : recent policy developments in Australia and Sweden. /

by Lofgren, Hans.

Publisher: 1999Description: p. 145-158.Notes: Rec. no. for conference: B9540 (v. 1) ; B9541 (v. 2) December 1999 Includes bibliographical references indexed chapterAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Public expenditure on hospitals : measuring the distributional impact. /

by Schofield, Deborah.

Publisher: Bruce, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling. University of Canberra 1998Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 1998 Includes bibliographical references Includes errata At head of title: NATSEMAvailability: (1)

Reforming Australia's hidden welfare state : tax expenditures as welfare for the rich /

by Spies-Butche, Benjamin | Stebbing, Adam.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Centre for Policy Development 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: As Australia enters recession and the Budget enters deficit, one of the least effective and most unfair forms of government spending has increased dramatically. Tax expenditures (in the form of tax breaks on superannuation, the private health insurance and childcare rebates, housing concessions etc) are increasing in number and cost, despite being significantly less equitable than other forms of government assistance. ; Because tax expenditures do not go through the same review process as normal government spending, they tend to be less accountable and transparent. As a result, tax expenditures attract less media attention and less democratic scrutiny. It is essential that their growing slice of Commonwealth spending be scrutinised and in some cases reconsidered. ; This paper outlines possible reforms to one of the largest tax expenditures, superannuation. By transforming this particular tax expenditure into a rebate program, which would be subject to proper budgetary scrutiny, Australia’s superannuation arrangements could be made more accountable and more equitable. If successful, this model could then be applied to other areas of tax expenditure.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Responsible rebalancing : framing the 1996 Commonwealth budget in a time of modest growth : submission to the Economic Planning Advisory Commission. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1996Description: 33 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 1996Availability: Items available for loan: BSL Archives (1).

Shifting the burden to the consumers of health care. /

by Richardson, Jeff.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Council of Social Service 1997Description: 15 leaves.Notes: Congress held on 6-7 November 1997 Rec. no. for conference:B9526 indexed paperAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The economics of a two tier health system : a fairer Medicare? /

by Apps, Patricia | Rees, Ray | Savage, Elizabeth.

Publisher: Centre for Economic Policy Research, Australian National University 2004Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://econrsss.anu.edu.au/pdf/DP478.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:17:46 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The politics of Medicare : who gets what, when and how. /

by Gray, Gwendolyn.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. University of New South Wales Press 2004Description: 111 p.Notes: Includes bibliographical referencesAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Threats to universal health care . /

by Duckett, Stephen.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. The Whitlam Institute. The University of Western Sydney 2004Description: HTML.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Why don't retirees insure against long-term care expenses? : evidence from survey responses /

by Brown, Jeffrey R | National Bureau of Economic Research | Goda, Gopi Shah | McGarry, Kathleen.

Publisher: unpubDescription: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Prepared for the 13th Annual Joint Conference of the Retirement Research Consortium 'Innovations in Retirement Security' August 4-5, 2011 Washington, DC Bibliography : p. 26-27Summary: We conduct a detailed survey of those nearing and in retirement to help assess the relative support for numerous alternative hypotheses regarding the small size of the long-term care insurance market. We categorize these hypotheses into four broad categories: (i) Preferences and Beliefs, which includes factors such as time preference, risk aversion, bequests, statedependent utility, and beliefs about the need for care, (ii) Substitutes for Insurance, such as the ability to pay for care out of wealth, home equity, or family resources, a plan to rely on Medicaid, or mistaken beliefs that such care is covered by Medicare, (iii) Substitutes for Formal Care, most notably including the ability to receive care from family members rather than relying on formal market-based care, and (iv) Features of the Private Market, including concerns about cost, affordability, counter-party risk, and distrust of insurers. We find numerous significant differences in the likelihood of buying insurance based on differences in each of these dimensions. For example, we find that individuals are much more likely to purchase private long-term care insurance if they place a higher value on money when sick versus money when healthy (i.e., state-dependent preferences), if they report a stronger bequest motive, if they believe they are more likely to need care, if they place a stronger emphasis on the avoidance of burdening their families with care provision, prefer care to be given by professionals, and believe premiums are appropriately priced given the care they provide. Individuals are much less likely to purchase private insurance if they believe their family is likely to take care of them, if they are concerned about affordability of insurance, if they are more concerned about counter-party risk, or that they insurance company might deny legitimate claims or raise premiums in the future.Availability: (1)

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