Brotherhood of St Laurence

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A good practice guide for practitioners : supporting community and social enterprise in deprived communities /

by Cox, Ed | Institute for Public Policy Research | Viitanen, Jenni.

Publisher: Brinnington, Stockport, England Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2010 Bibliography : p. 35-36Summary: In Spring 2010, ippr north carried out new research exploring the critical success factors for community and social enterprise in deprived communities in the North West of England This Good Practice Guide summarises the findings and recommendations of research in a format aimed at practitioners, particularly those working in local authorities. It is not intended to be a comprehensive guide but simply seeks to set out material gathered through the research in a more accessible format. It is divided into five sections, each addressing a specific issue or concern, and is interspersed with case study examples of some of the best community and social enterprises in the North West Region of England.Availability: (1)

A qualitative study of apprenticeship pay: an ippr report to the Low Pay Commission /

by Lawton, Kayte | Institute for Public Policy Research | Norris, Emma.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2010 Bibliography : p. 61 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Although most apprentices are employed, the majority are exempt from UK National Minimum Wage legislation, and pay rates for apprentices vary significantly across different industries and by gender and age. The Low Pay Commission (LPC) has been asked by Government to consider how apprentice pay could be brought under the National Minimum Wage framework. This report, commissioned by the Low Pay Commission, examines variations in apprentice pay across the UK and the role of apprentice pay in young people?s decisions to start and complete an apprenticeship. The report also considers the potential responses of employers to the introduction of a national minimum wage for apprentices.Availability: (1)

Ageing and well-being in an international context /

by Clifton, Jonathan | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This report opens up the policy debates surrounding population ageing beyond the traditional realm of healthcare and pensions. It explores how the well-being of older people can be incorporated into four other areas: relationships, work, learning and the built environment. These were all identified in the first phase of ippr?s Politics of Ageing project as important drivers of well-being. ; This paper provides examples of policies and programmes that have been successful in other countries. The aim is that these case studies will inspire new responses to ageing in the UK.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Creative destruction : placing innovation at the heart of progressive economics /

by Lent, Adam | Institute for Public Policy Research | Lockwood, Matthew.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2010 Bibliography : p. 43-44Summary: This pamphlet, the first output of ippr's New Era Economics programme, argues that in light of new economic thinking and the mistakes of the past, contemporary economic policy needs to be centred on three core principles: it must be innovation-centred, pragmatic and aware.Availability: (1)

Dementia care in London /

by Sachrajda, Alice | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2011 Bibliography : p. 23Summary: Providing high-quality care and support for the increasing numbers of people with dementia is one of the most challenging and complex issues of our time. The number of people with dementia is set to double to 1.4 million in the next 30 years and the costs are expected to treble. ippr's work in this area responds to the need for service providers and commissioners to have a better evidence base on ageing in London. This briefing identifies areas of unmet need, highlights problems with current provision, and draws attention to models of best practice.Availability: (1)

Designing a life-course savings account : how to help low-to-middle income families save more /

by Dolphin, Tony | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2011 Bibliography pp. 37-38 Appendices pp. 39-46Summary: This paper reports the results of research designed to identify the features of a savings account that would appeal particularly to low-to-middle income families while also being viable for financial service providers. Families in the UK, especially low-to-middle income families - the median family income in 2008/09 was around 26,000 - find it hard to save, other than for short-term events such as Christmas and family birthdays. Among the reasons they give is a belief that the right savings vehicle does not exist for them. Based on workshops with would-be service users and providers, this report identifies the key features of an attractive and feasible 'life-course savings account' and proposes two specific savings products: a Lifetime Bonus Savings Account, aimed at encouraging saving, particularly to help families cope with emergencies, and a Long-term Investment Account, designed to replace the existing cash ISA scheme for savers at a higher level. These kinds of savings products balance rewards for savers against the cost to the public purse.Availability: (1)

Expectations & aspirations : public attitudes towards social care /

by Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: In advance of the publication of a government Green Paper on social care, ippr and Pricewaterhouse Coopers LLP commissioned research to explore public levels of awareness and understanding of social care provision. The findings expose a lack of awareness about social care, confusion about how services are funded and a widespread lack of preparation or planning for future care needs.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Getting what we deserve? Attitudes to pay, reward and desert : interim report /

by Lanning, Tess | Institute for Public Policy Research | Lawton, Kayte.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011 Bibliography : pp. 36-38Summary: This report investigates the role of pay as reward or recognition for different kinds of work, skills and outcomes. Drawing on polling and extensive qualitative research, it considers how the functioning of pay is currently perceived and what the appropriate foundations for improvement might be.Availability: (1)

Going for growth /

by Straw, Will (ed.) | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: Institute for Public Policy Research, Left Foot Forward and Ebert Stiftung 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Contributors: Philippe Legrain, Duncan Weldon, Gustav Horn, Richard Seline, Charles Leadbeater, Kitty Ussher, Adam Lent, Gerald Holtham, Andy Westwood, Stian Westlake, Anna Turley, Tony DolphinSummary: Going for growth is a new collection of essays published jointly by ippr, Left Foot Forward and German think-tank Friedrich Ebert Stiftung - an esteemed collection of authors includes ippr's senior economist Tony Dolphin, NEE panel member Charles Leadbeater, NEE collaborator Adam Lent and former ippr director Gerald Holtham. The book's focus is the role of smart government in creating the conditions for growth, and therefore jobs.Availability: (1)

Jobs for the future : the path back to full employment in the UK /

by Dolphin, Tony | Institute for Public Policy Research | Lawton, Kayte | McNeil, Clare.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2011 Bibliography pp. 76-81 Appendix p. 82 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: A higher employment rate would in the long-term ease some of the problems faced by successive governments in the UK. It would mean higher taxes and lower welfare payments, simultaneously making balancing the budget easier and ensuring sufficient funds are available for universal services such as health and education. However the path back to full employment will not be an easy one. Evidence suggests that the public sector has been filling in for insufficient private sector job creation over the last 20 years. One certainty in the next few years is that public sector employment will fall, so if private sector employment does not increase rapidly, the economic recovery is likely to be weak or not 'jobs rich'. As it stands, the Coalition government's plans for growth and job creation will be insufficient to meet the combined challenges of high unemployment and growing labour supply over the next few years. This report's recommendations focus on promoting growth in employment and limiting the expansion of long-term unemployment.Availability: (1)

Making the case for universal childcare /

by Ben-Galim, Dalia | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2011 Bibliography pp. 18-19Summary: This paper makes the economic case for universal childcare for preschool-aged children. On the basis of new cost-benefit analysis, we show that universal childcare pays a return to the government of 20,050 (over four years) in terms of tax revenue minus the cost of childcare for every woman who returns to full-time employment after one year of maternity leave. We therefore argue that the provision of universal childcare should be a strategic priority for public service and welfare reform in the UK.Availability: (1)

Now it's personal : learning from welfare-to-work approaches around the world /

by Ben-Galim, Dalia ed | Sachrajda, Alice ed.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : pp.37-38 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This collection of short essays draws on international experiences and approaches of personalisation. It focuses on the role of the personal adviser as a way to explore how policy can reach its goal of providing personalised employment support and advice. Personalisation 'tailored support offered to help people (back) into work' has become a dominant feature of many welfare regimes around the world. The role of the personal adviser is an important aspect of offering more flexible, tailored support into work. While the language may differ from country to country, the challenges that many governments face, such as reducing their welfare bills and improving cost effectiveness, are similar, as is the move towards a focus on getting people into decent jobs that they then retain. The essays strengthen the case for citizen-centred welfare. They provide both advice and warnings to the UK's coalition government and providers across different sectors as to how to make a single work programme cost-effective and responsive to citizens? needs. The contributors also raise important questions over how a diverse customer base will be supported, how to ensure that innovative approaches will not be squeezed out, and where jobs might come from in the future.Availability: (1)

Now it's personal : personal advisers and the new public service workforce /

by McNeil , Clare | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 88-91 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: For many of us, our experience of public services is shaped largely by our interaction with the frontline staff with whom we come into contact. The quality of that interaction can be just as important to us as the outcome we receive from the service. That a service is only as good as the people delivering it has become a clich . Yet what that understanding implies for public policy and how services are designed has not been sufficiently explored. This report gives shape to the argument that the next focus of public sector reform should be on the relationship between the citizen and frontline staff in public services. It does so by focusing on what matters in the relationship between citizen and the state on the frontline of public services. Specifically, it considers how the relationship between adviser and benefit claimant can be improved by ensuring frontline staff have the right incentives, degree of control over their work and autonomy to provide effective and responsive services.Availability: (1)

Parents at the centre /

by Ben-Galim, Dalia | Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2011 Bibliography : pp. 33-35Summary: The objective of the research presented in this report is to understand why some parents who are entitled to use early years services don't normally do so. More specifically, our research seeks to understand how parents access information that shapes their decision-making about early years provision, and how service providers can better engage with and support parents to meet their families' needs. On the basis of our findings, we make the case for a number of key policy changes, meant to ensure that early years provision enables children from low-income families to break out of the intergenerational cycle of disadvantage.Availability: (1)

Policies for Peace of Mind : devolution and older age in the UK /

by McCormick, James | Institute for Public Policy Research | McDowell, Eleanor | Harris, Andrew.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This paper considers the changing landscape of policy and practice for older people since 2000 and how this varies across the four countries of the United Kingdom. We reflect on UK Government reforms over this period as well as the early choices made by the devolved administrations, which have varying powers.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Review of access to essential services : financial inclusion and utilities /

by Lawton, Kayte | Institute for Public Policy Research | Platt, Reg.

Publisher: London Institute for Public Policy Research 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010 Bibliography : p. 55-57 An ippr report to the Equality and Human Rights Commission.Summary: This report was commissioned by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to inform its first Triennial Review of inequalities and human rights in the UK. The report focuses on two interlinked policy areas, loosely brought together under the concept of access to essential services: financial exclusion and affordable utilities. We deal with each policy area in separate sections of the report and our focus is on providing statistical and other evidence about the extent of exclusion and inequalities, and how this plays out across the different equality groups. Financial exclusion refers to the inability, difficulty or reluctance to access appropriate mainstream financial services. The effects can include an inability to take part in day-to-day financial transactions; the inability to cope with unexpected events or planned lifestyle changes; and having to pay more for certain products and services. Given the essentially universal provision of energy and water services in the UK, the central issue when it comes to equality in the utilities is cost and affordability. In recent years, the primary concern has been around fuel poverty and the serious negative effects this can have on the health and well-being of certain groups.Availability: (1)

Richer yet poorer : economic inequality and polarisation in the north of England /

by Schmuecker, Katie | Institute for Public Policy Research | Viitanen, Jenni.

Publisher: Newcastle Upon Tyne, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research (IRRP North) 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2011 Bibliography : p. 36-38Summary: This report explores how patterns of household income and individual pay inequality differ across the Northern regions and the extent to which Northern city-regions are becoming more spatially polarised in terms of household income and segregated in terms of economic inactivity over time. It also considers whether different levels of polarisation correlate to social and community outcomes in city-regions. Overall, levels of household income and individual pay inequality in the North are lower than the UK average, particularly compared to the Greater South East. But between 1998 and 2008 pay inequality increased in the North, in line with wider UK trends. It is fairer up North, but equality is being eroded over timeAvailability: (1)

The future's green : jobs and in the UK low-carbon transition /

by Bird, Jenny | Institute for Public Policy Research | Kayte Lawton.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Since 2008 there has been a significant increase in attention to the idea of jobs in lowcarbon and environmental services, known as ?green jobs? ? which can help tackle climate change and unemployment at the same time ? from politicians from across the political spectrum. In July 2009, the Government published its Low Carbon Industrial Strategy, which sets out how it will take advantage of the ?low-carbon opportunity?, to develop Low Carbon Economic Areas and to stimulate further low-carbon innovation. ; However, there is a failure to acknowledge that some jobs may also be at risk in the lowcarbon transition and there could be a backlash against policies designed to tackle climatechange as the potential impacts on vulnerable sectors become clear. The strategy also implies that ?green? jobs will help cut unemployment but the most optimistic estimates of new job creation fall a long way short of the numbers needed to make any significant decrease. These two problems suggest that the UK needs an economic development plan that will identify where new jobs will come from in the future, and how these jobs will be ?low-carbon compatible?.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Towards a Smarter State /

by Institute for Public Policy Research.

Publisher: London, U.K. IPPR, Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: A major debate about the role of the state has opened up in British politics that looks set to define and frame the policy agendas of the major political parties in the run up to the next general election and beyond. Although this debate pre-dates the financial crisis and the deepening recession that has engulfed the economy, such developments will have a profound impact on public services and have already begun to catalyse a fundamental reappraisal of the state, to which all parties must respond.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

When times are tough : four families' stories /

by Ben-Galim, Dalia | Institute for Public Policy Research | Seal-Jones, Rachel.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: IPPR has examined how 58 low-income families manage their day-to-day finances. The innovative research, which took place in London, Newcastle, Nottingham and Glasgow in 2008-2009, has provided insight into the pressures that many low-income families face as they struggle to balance their income and expenditure. ; We are publishing four case studies from the research to illustrate the impact of broad social and economic trends at household level and share knowledge and data. Each case study has been chosen to provide an individual family narrative around poverty and the economic crisis. ; They focus on: ; Living with a disability - how one family in Newcasle is coping after an accident left the main breadwinner disabled and unable to work. ; Lone parents and low pay - why employment has not been a route out of poverty for one lone-parent family in London. ; Redundancy - how redundancy has dramatically changed the financial circumstances of one household in Glasgow and its impact on daily family life. ; The poverty premium - perceptions of the current financial crisis through the eyes of one family in Nottingham and how this affects the premium low-income families pay on essential goods and servicesAvailability: (1)

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