Brotherhood of St Laurence

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'Will the real Aborigine please stand up' : strategies for breaking the stereotypes and changing the conversation /

by Gorringe, Scott | Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait slander Studies | Ross, Joe | Fforde, Cressida.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Studies 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2011 Bibliography : p. 16-18Summary: This paper provides a background to issues discussed at a workshop held by AIATSIS in December 2009, and offers some of the outcomes in order to provide a basis for further debate and dialogue and to inform future forums. The workshop focused on a matter of growing concern to many Aboriginal people - the prevalence of an erosive mindset of deficit which pervades many Aboriginal communities and its attachment to notions of identity, which includes perceptions of authenticity widely adopted from similar views held about Aboriginal people by non-Indigenous Australians. The workshop discussed issues such as: the identification of perceptions of identity within and outside Aboriginal Australia; how perceptions of authenticity arise and why they persist; the social impact of such perceptions; and the impact of legislation and policy that links entitlement to identity. Disengaging the language of disadvantage (or pathologising discourses) was identified at the workshop as fundamental to effecting change. As methods of producing change, participants identified the need for creating safe spaces for discussion, challenging mindsets, habits and conversations and co-creating transformative pathways.Availability: (1)

A Better way: building healthy, safe and sustainable communities in the Northern Territory through a community development approach /

by Phillips, Jacqueline | Australians for Native Title and Reconciliation | Franklin, Emma | Viswanathan, Rajiv.

Publisher: Dulwich Hill, N.S.W ANTaR 2011Description: 70 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2011 Includes bibliography : pp. 66-70Summary: Neither the Labor Government nor the Coalition has proposed or committed to the development of a long-term, sustainable community development strategy for Aboriginal communities in the NT despite calls for such a plan by key Aboriginal organisations from the NT.1 However, both have acknowledged the need to start planning for the next stage in the Government?s response to the issues facing remote NT communities. In responding to Stronger Futures, this paper challenges both major parties to support the development of such a strategy, in partnership and negotiation with Aboriginal leaders, organisations and community members.Availability: (1)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education action plan : 2010-2014 /

by Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs.

Publisher: Carlton South, Vic. Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 45Summary: A national plan that commits all governments in Australia to a unified approach to closing the gap in education outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Education Action Plan 2010-2014, was developed by the Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood Development and Youth Affairs (MCEECDYA) as part of the Council of Australian Governments' (COAG's) reform agenda to improve life outcomes for indigenous Australians. MCEECDYA approved the plan in April 2010 and it was subsequently endorsed by COAG in May 2011.Availability: (1)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander wellbeing : a focus on children and youth /

by Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T.Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) catalogue no. 4725.0 2011Notes: April 2011Summary: This publication provides information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people from data collected in the 2008 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey. ; The publication structure is based on the ABS Framework for Measuring Wellbeing: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples. This framework consists of a very broad range of topics considered to be important for the measurement of the mental, social and physical health of Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. Articles in this publication will be released progressively. The first release will contain articles on children and young peoples' cultural participation and housing circumstances, as well as their experiences of different aspects of the law and justice system.Availability: No items available

Aboriginal inclusion framework 2nd phase report /

by Aboriginal Inclusion Framework.

Publisher: Victoria Cooperative Change 2011Description: 73 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Proposed framework to achieve Aboriginal inclusion to lift the cultural competency of the Victorian GovernmentSummary: The Aboriginal Inclusion Framework is an initiative focused on producing inclusive, consistent and effective service delivery to Aboriginal people through all departments and those agencies provided with funds by the Victorian Government.Availability: (1)

Aboriginal policy and programmes in Australia /

by Rio Tinto.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Rio Tinto Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Social Inclusion and Corporate Social Responsibility workshop 21 November 2008Summary: This booklet outlines Rio Tinto's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander policy and programmes in Australia.Availability: (1)

Career ready : skills and training for a career : discussion paper /

by Generationone.

Publisher: Redfern, N.S.W. Generationone 2011Description: 44 p. : ill.Other title: Skills and training for a career : a Generationone policy.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Many employers want to expand their Indigenous workforce and many Indigenous people want to work. However, employers are having difficulty connecting with Indigenous jobseekers who are work and job ready, while some Indigenous jobseekers lack the basic skills and relevant training to apply for and participate in real work. Training is not aligned to the needs of the employment market, and despite large amounts of government expenditure, is failing to ensure Indigenous people are gaining work upon completion. This has to change. Communities and employers have advocated for changes to training and work preparation systems. The GenerationOne Skills and Training for a Career draft policy is about supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to become work and job ready, in line with the needs of employers. It is also about preparing workplaces for Indigenous involvement so that diversity is valued and seen as a strength. Under this framework, local industries and employers will work in partnership with Indigenous people and their communities, and governments, service providers, and education and training providers will support and enable that partnership to operate effectively.Availability: (1)

Changes in Indigenous labour force status : establishing employment as a social norm? /

by Gray, Matthew | Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal conomic Policy Research | Hunter, Boyd.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Other title: CAEPR Topical Issue ; no. 7.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 6Summary: This Topical Issue provides an assessment of the extent to which Indigenous labour force status has changed over the period 1994 to 2008. It finds that over the period 1994 to 2008 the non-CDEP employment rate of the Indigenous population increased from 31.1% to 50.5%. There were increases for both Indigenous men and women. The non-CDEP employment rate increased by 21 percentage points from 37.9% to 58.8% for Indigenous men and by 18 percentage points from 25.0% to 42.9% for Indigenous women. These increases are very substantial: to put them in context, the increase in the employment rate for the working age Australian population as a whole for men during this period increased by 5 percentage points, and for women it increased by 10 percentage points.Availability: (1)

Common ground, uncommon results : closing the gap /

by Business Council of Australia.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Business Council of Australia 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010Summary: This report marks the second installment of the BCA's reporting on the Indigenous engagement efforts of its membership. It confirms that BCA members are showing real leadership in committing their people and companies to playing a significant role in helping to close the gap on Indigenous disadvantage in Australia. More companies are now actively involved across a wide range of initiatives. All are doing so with the strong backing of their chief executives. And they are motivated by a desire to see genuine, long-term progressAvailability: (1)

Early childhood and education services for Indigenous children prior to starting school /

by Sims, Margaret | Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Closing the Gap Clearinghouse 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Closing the Gap Clearinghouse. Resource sheet ; no. 7.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011 Bibliography pp. 12-15Summary: Though school readiness is a key factor in closing the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians, there are also other factors to consider when helping young children. This resource sheet reviews the evidence on early childhood and education services for Indigenous young children. It outlines what works, what doesn't, and what further research is needed. Topics include: the evidence on whether early childhood programs address disadvantage; the characteristics of successful early childhood programs; home visiting programs; integrated early childhood service delivery; the features of successful interventions; applicability to early childhood Indigenous programs; culturally specific services; and facilitators and barriers.Availability: (1)

Growing old well : a life cycle approach for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People : inaugural National Workshop of the Australian Association of Gerontology, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Ageing /

by Australian Association of Gerontology. Aboriginal and Torres trait Islander Ageing Committee.

Publisher: Loganholme, QLD Australian Association of Gerontology 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Association of Gerontology. Aboriginal and Torres.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 13 Includes separate appendices reportSummary: Through keynote presentations from four academics working in the area, to the sharing of a life story from an esteemed Aboriginal Elder activist, to the sharing of unique life experiences of all participants in smaller work groups, this workshop provided an opportunity for rich debate and dialogue with a number of recurring themes and recommendations related to Aboriginal ageing.Availability: (1)

Guidelines for ethical research in Australian Indigenous studies /

by Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait slander Studies.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: At every stage, research with and about Indigenous peoples must be founded on a process of meaningful engagement and reciprocity between the researcher and the Indigenous people. It is important that the Institute's Guidelines for Ethical Research in Australian Indigenous Studies embody the best standards of ethical research and human rights. The AIATSIS Research Ethics Committee (REC) is concerned with reviewing the ethical aspects of research projects, including ethical suitability and oversight as appropriate during the course of a project. The Guidelines include a statement of the principles of ethical research in Indigenous studies, followed by an explanation of each principle, accompanied by some practical applications. These practical points are not intended to be directive but are recommendations and suggestions to achieve the best standards of ethical research.Availability: (1)

Older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people /

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Bureau of Statistics 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cat. no. IHW 44Summary: This report describes the age and geographic distribution of the older Indigenous population, its particular requirements in terms of aged care and support, and the pattern of usage of these services. At the 2006 Census, there were approximately 60,000 Indigenous Australians aged 50 years and over, accounting for about 12% of the total Indigenous population. By comparison, 31% of the non-Indigenous population fell into this age group. However, the number of older Indigenous people is growing and estimated at 76,300 in 2011. Older Indigenous people have poorer health and higher rates of disability than other Australians in the same age group.Availability: (1)

Overcoming Indigenous disadvantage : key indicators 2011 /

by Australia. Steering Committee for the Review of Government ervice Provision.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Productivity Commission 2011Description: HTML.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes the overview and main report. Published in 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009 and 2011. Also includes Consultation Reports published in 2003, 2006 Latest edition copies of both overview and main report only kept PDF of latest edition main report onlySummary: In April 2002, the Council of Australian Governments commissioned the Steering Committee to produce a regular report against key indicators of Indigenous disadvantage. This report has an important long-term objective. It is to inform Australian governments about whether policy programs and interventions are achieving positive outcomes for Indigenous people. This will help guide where further work is needed. The Steering Committee has consulted widely with Indigenous organisations, governments and researchers in developing the report and the indicator framework on which it was based.Availability: (1)

Remote Indigenous housing procurement and post-occupancy outcomes : a comparative study /

by Davidson, James | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Go-Sam, Carroll | Memmott, Paul.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2011Description: HTML.Other title: Australian Housing and Urban Remote Indigenous housing.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Project Number: 20583 PDF is of the final report URL contains: Remote Indigenous housing procurement and post-occupancy outcomes: a comparative study. Positioning paper ; no. 129 Remote Indigenous housing procurement: a comparative study. Final report ; no. 167Summary: This project sought to understand how housing procurement strategies impact on outcomes for Indigenous people in remote settlements. It examined four cases studies where governments have intervened in housing procurement processes and what makes for success in achieving improvements in social, cultural and economic outcomes.Availability: (1)

Universal access to early childhood education for Australia's Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children /

by Ministerial Council for Education, Early Childhood evelopment and Youth Affairs.

Publisher: [Canberra, A.C.T.] [Dept. of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations] [2011]Description: 35p.Other title: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Universal Access.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical references.Summary: This Strategy highlights the national agreements, reforms and associated developments that are relevant to achieving universal access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. It also outlines the current situation regarding the enrolment and attendance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in ECE in urban, regional and remote settings and across jurisdictions and identifies four key focus areas for future effort: ; increasing access to early childhood education; ; positive community awareness and engagement; ; quality early childhood programs and activities; and ; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural awareness of teachers and support staff.Availability: (1)

Victorian Government Aboriginal inclusion framework /

by Victorian Government Department of Planning and Community evelopment.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Department of Planning and Community Development 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010Summary: The Aboriginal Inclusion Framework is an initiative of the Secretaries' Group on Aboriginal Affairs. It was developed after extensive consultation with Aboriginal communities. Acknowledgment and respect of Aboriginal culture, values and practices is at the heart of successful engagement with Aboriginal people. The Framework outlines the objective to provide all Victorian Government policy makers, program managers and service providers with a structure for reviewing their practice and reforming the way they engage with and address the needs of Aboriginal people in Victoria. This is fundamental to supporting the Government's work to delver better outcomes for Aboriginal Victorians.Availability: (1)

What works to overcome indigenous disadvantage : key learnings gaps in the evidence /

by Al-Yaman, Fadwa | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Higgins, Daryl.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 50 appendices : p. 38-49Summary: This paper provides policy makers with key findings about what works and assesses the gaps in the evidence.Availability: (1)

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