Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Nations of immigrants : Australia, the United States, and International migration. /

by Freeman, Gary P. (ed.) | Jupp, James (ed.).

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Oxford University Press 1992Description: xi, 250p.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Negotiating the maze: review of arrangements for overseas skills recognition, upgrading and licensing. /

by Australia. Parliament. Joint Standing Committee on Migration.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of Immigration and Multicultural and Indigenous Affairs 2006Description: xxv, 325 p.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Neighborhood diversity and the appreciation of native and immigrant-owned homes /

by Cobb-Clark, Deborah A | Sinning, Mathias.

Publisher: Institute for the Study of Labour 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This paper examines the effect of neighborhood diversity on the nativity gap in home-value appreciation in Australia. Specifically, immigrant homeowners experienced a 41.7 percent increase in median home values between 2001 and 2006, while the median value of housing owned by the native-born increased by 59.4 percent over the same period. We use a semi-parametric decomposition approach to assess the relative importance of the various determinants of home values in producing this gap. We find that the differential returns to housing wealth are not related to changes in the nature of the houses or the neighborhoods in which immigrants and native-born homeowners live. Rather, the gap stems from the fact that over time there were differential changes across groups in the hedonic prices (i.e., returns) associated with the underlying determinants of home values.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

New beginnings : life in Australia : supporting new arrivals on their settlement journey 2005-06. /

by Australia. Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Department 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.dimia.gov.au/media/publications/settle/_pdf/new_beginnings2005-06.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:40:24 PM Status: Error Details: Failed to send HTTP request (WinHttpSendRequest)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

New country, new stories : discrimination and disadvantage experienced by people in small and emerging communities. /

by Australia. Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission 1999Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.hreoc.gov.au/pdf/race_discrim/newcountry_newstories.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:26:23 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

New labour market program reforms and the disadvantaged /

by MacDonald, Helen.

Publisher: 1997Description: 5 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Workshop presentation at the Development of the Vietnamese Community in Australia Conference held at Melbourne University, 4 & 5 April 1997. 2 copiesAvailability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

New labour program reforms and the disadvantaged /

by MacDonald, Helen.

Publisher: unpub. Description: 5p.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

New migrant outcomes : results from the third longitudinal survey of immigrants to Australia. /

by Australia. Department of Immigration and Citizenship.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Department 2007Description: HTML.Availability: No items available

Occupation-education mismatch of immigrant workers in Europe: context and policies /

by Aleksynska, Mariya | Centre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations nternationales | Tritah, Ahmed.

Publisher: Paris, France Centre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations Internationales (CEPII) 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Centre d'Etudes Prospectives et d'Informations.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2011 Bibliography : p. 25-30 Appendices: p. 34-37Summary: This paper analyses occupational matching of immigrants from over seventy countries of origin to 22 European countries. Using European Social Survey for the years 2002-2009 and the multinomial logit framework, we show that, relative to the native born, immigrants are more likely to be both under- and overeducated for the jobs that they perform. This mismatch is due to individual-specific factors, such as labor market experience and its transferability. Immigrants' outcomes converge to those of the native born with the years of labor market experience. The mismatch is also due to immigrants' selection and sorting across countries. Notably, we show that origin countries' degree of income inequality and the quality of human capital, by affecting selection, mostly matter for undereducation of immigrants. Overeducation is determined to a greater extent by destination-country economic conditions and labor market institutions. Immigrant-specific policies in destination countries, such as those improving eligibility and fighting discrimination, also positively affect overall matching, while policies promoting integration decrease undereducation.Availability: (1)

On the risk of unemployment : a comparative assessment of the labour market success of migrants in Australia. /

by Thapa, Prem J.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Centre for Economic Policy Research, Australian National University 2004Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2004Availability: (1)

One community, many voices : the diversity and needs of the Sri Lankan community in the City of Monash. /

by Andrews, Sophie.

Publisher: Migrant Information Centre (Eastern Melbourne) 2005Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.miceastmelb.com.au/documents/NeedsAnalysisSriLanka.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:29:01 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Out of sight, out of mind : migration, entrepreneurship and social capital /

by Wahba, Jackline | Zenou, Yves.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: IZA Discussion Paper No. 4541 November 2009Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Parliamentary Inquiry into Substance Abuse: submission to the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2000Description: PDF; 12p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2000Summary: In the past the Brotherhood has not contributed to the debate around public policy responses to the harm associated with either legal or illegal drug use, knowing that there are others more qualified to do so and that some church-based agencies have given disproportionate attention to alcohol and other drug issues as social problems. The evidence from our services on the impacts of substance abuse on the people we serve, and on the communities we share, have prompted this submission.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

Participation and employment : a survey of newly arrived migrants and refugees in Melbourne /

by O'Dwyer, Monica | AMES. Research and Policy Unit.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. AMES. Research and Policy Unit 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 17Summary: In 2011 AMES Research and Policy surveyed 1688 migrants and refugees who have been in Australia for less than 2 years to gather data on the community participation and employment of this group. Survey participants were all people who arrived with no or low levels of English and who were enrolled in an AMEP class in Melbourne. The results indicated that in this early stage of arrival in Australia, about one third of people were starting to get involved in local groups and more than one third had started working. Participants in this survey were also involved in a range of other activities including connecting with their children?s school and community, volunteering, making donations and sending money overseas to assist friends and family. Participants also pointed out that learning English and finding work were factors that would enable them to participate more in the future.Availability: (1)

Partnering for goodness sake : ensuring economic participation for culturally and linguistically diverse migrants and refugees /

by Scarth, Cath.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2008Description: 10 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1), BSL Archives (1).

Pathways and pitfalls : the journey of refugee young people in and around the education system in Greater Dandenong. /

by Centre for Multicultural Youth Issues.

Publisher: Carlton, Vic. Centre for Multicultural Youth Issues 2004Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2004 Includes references and appendicesSummary: English as a Second Language (ESL) programs for new arrivals have a crucial role to play in providing young refugees with the necessary English skills to be able to make a successful transition into mainstream education and employment. The central role that English proficiency plays in determining the successful integration of migrants into Australian society is well demonstrated in this and other research. Due to the pivotal importance that initial intensive language learning experiences are likely to play in the settlement trajectory of newly arrived young people, the central focus of this research has been an analysis of the ESL New Arrivals Program (ESL NAP) in the City of Greater Dandenong. In particular, this research explored whether or not the ESL NAP was equipping young people with the necessary skills to make a successful transition into mainstream education and employment through interviewing service providers who work with young refugees and by interviewing some young refugees themselves.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Pathways to employment for migrants and refugees? the case of social enterprise /

by Barraket, Jo.

Publisher: [Auckland, N.Z.] The Australian Sociological Association 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This paper examines the use of social enterprise ? that is, not for personal profit businesses that have a strong social purpose- to support training and employment pathways for migrants and refugees facing multiple forms of exclusion. Drawing on an evaluation of a program that supports seven social enterprises in the Australian state of Victoria, the study finds that social enterprise affords unique local opportunities for economic and social participation for the program?s participants. Nevertheless, there are limits to the impacts of programs that mediate transitions within an increasingly flexible labour market without redressing the broader social determinants of labour market segmentation.Availability: (1)

People from NESB with disability in Australia : what does the data say? /

by National Ethnic Disability Alliance.

Publisher: Harris Park, N.S.W. National Ethnic Disability Alliance 2010Description: 22 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Australia is an increasingly diverse country, with a robust history of migration which has a strong impact upon Australian values, culture and composition, particularly with respect to the contribution that has been made by of a growing proportion of Australians with non English speaking background (NESB) ancestry. People from diverse backgrounds also include people with impairment and illness, with an increasingly large number of Australians from non English speaking backgrounds with disability. Despite evidence of a strong impact of cultural and linguistic diversity on the ?face? of Australia, there remains very little data on the role of non English speaking migration in shaping contemporary Australia and Australians. ; Within the Australian social policy literature, there has been a lack of analysis on how culture, language and faith affect participation and socio-economic outcomes, or how and whether these circumstances change between first and second generation migrants. It is palpably apparent that in order to understand social inclusion and exclusion in Australia, cultural, linguistic and faith diversity must also be understood, yet there is scant analysis in Australia of work in this area. ; This report highlights issues of significance for people from NESB with disability on the basis of the currently available data. It also highlights areas for urgent improvement with respect to data collection and analysis. Embracing such improvements will go a long way towards assessing progress of a socially inclusive Australia, avoiding discrimination against people from NESB with disability on the basis of lack of accountability alone.Availability: (1)

Perceptions and labor market outcomes of immigrants in Australia after 9/11 /

by Goel, Deepti.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labour 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: I examine whether after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 Muslim immigrants and immigrants who fit the Muslim Arab stereotype in Australia perceive a greater increase in religious and racial intolerance and discrimination compared to other immigrant groups. I also examine whether there is a differential change in their labor market outcomes. I find that after 9/11 there is a greater increase in the likelihood of Muslim men and of those who look like Muslims to report a lot of religious and racial intolerance and discrimination relative to other immigrants. Further, I do not find evidence that after 9/11 Muslims or their stereotypes show a differential change in the likelihood of looking for a new main job or of being employed. There is also no evidence of a differential change in hours worked or in wage incomes. This suggests that the Australian labor market did not react to attitudinal changes in society, at least in the immediate aftermath of 9/11.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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