Brotherhood of St Laurence

Your search returned 11 results.

Not what you expected? Check for suggestions
Achieving carbon pollution reduction and a switch to clean energy with carbon pollution pricing, limits and supporting policies : discussion paper /

by Climate Institute.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Climate Institute 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011Summary: This discussion paper focuses on pollution pricing mechanisms and an approach to setting scheme caps and targets. It comes on the back of recent proposals from Professor Garnaut, ill informed comments from the Coalition on robust governance structures and the release of an economists letter calling for effective pollution pricing.Availability: (1)

Assessing the effects of using a share of carbon price revenues for targeted tax reform : a report to the Garnaut Review 2011 update /

by Hatfield-Dodds, Steve | CSIRO Energy Transformed Flagship.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. CSIRO Energy Transformed Flagship 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011 Bibliography pp. 27-28Summary: This paper was commissioned by the Garnaut Review Update 2011 to analyse the extent to which using some portion of the carbon revenues raised could boost employment and economic activity (relative to other options for the use of carbon price revenues) through addressing existing high effective marginal tax rates and related disincentives. The paper draws on analysis undertaken in 2007, before the development of the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme, and applies these insights to key results from the Australian Government modelling (2008) undertaken by Treasury.Availability: (1)

Carbon pricing and reducing Australia's emissions /

by Garnaut, Ross | Garnaut Climate Change Review.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Garnaut Climate Change Review update paper ; no. 6, 2011.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 41-44Summary: It is in our national interest for Australia to play its proportionate part in the world meeting what is now a goal that has been agreed by the international community: reducing global emissions to an extent that holds temperature increases to below 2 C. Australia has more to lose than any other developed country if this goal is not achieved.Availability: (1)

Garnaut climate change review : final report /

by Garnaut, Ross | Garnaut Climate Change Review.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Garnaut Climate Change Review 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Global emissions trends /

by Garnaut, Ross | Garnaut Climate Change Review.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Garnaut Climate Change Review update paper ; no. 3, 2011.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 31-32Summary: This Update paper re-examines likely trends in global emissions in the absence of effective mitigation and in the absence of major feedbacks from climate change to economic growth. It analyses changes in the variables affecting emissions growth (namely population, economic output, energy demand, and the economic and technological factors affecting the choice among sources of energy) in major countries and regions. It explores the implications of the Great Crash of 2008, which lowered the long-term growth trajectory of developed countries, but did not slow the immense growth momentum of the largest developing countries, nor end the higher growth of the early twenty first century in other developing countries. This paper provides an update of observed global emissions to 2009, and updates business as usual projections to 2030. The projections provide a basis for reassessing the task of reducing global emissions and the distribution of that effort among developed and developing countries.Availability: (1)

Low emissions technology and the innovation challenge /

by Garnaut, Ross | Garnaut Climate Change Review.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Garnaut Climate Change Review update paper ; no. 7, 2011.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 46-51Summary: New technologies will significantly affect the cost of a global effort to mitigate climate change. As discussed in Update Paper six (Carbon pricing and reducing Australia?s emissions), putting a price on carbon will provide an incentive to reduce emissions. Innovation will make the transition faster and less costly. The introduction of a carbon price will deliver a structural shift in the economy as producers and consumers make and use goods, services and processes that generate lower emissions. A technological response will lower the cost of the structural shift. There will be opportunities for cost-reducing innovation across all sectors of the economy: energy and electricity generation; energy efficiency; transport; urban planning and design; agriculture, forestry and biosequestration more generally; manufacturing; and mining. The policy recommendations in this paper apply to all parts of the economy.Availability: (1)

Progress towards effective global action on climate change /

by Garnaut, Ross | Garnaut Climate Change Review.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Garnaut Climate Change Review update paper ; no. 2, 2011.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 34-35Summary: The threat of climate change to prosperity in one country cannot be removed by the actions of that country alone. Effective action to moderate the risks of human-induced climate change requires large contributions to reductions in emissions from all major countries, and substantial contributions from the rest of the world as well. As a result, the search for effective climate change policy is partly a search for effective cooperation amongst countries of a kind and dimension that has never previously been known. This paper discusses that search for an international basis for effective climate change policy. It cannot avoid analysing wider changes in the international system, as these are the context of any success or failure in this new province of international cooperation.Availability: (1)

The science of climate change /

by Garnaut, Ross | Garnaut Climate Change Review.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Garnaut Climate Change Review update paper ; no. 5, 2011.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 56-67Summary: The most important and straightforward of the quantitatively testable propositions from the mainstream science have been confirmed or shown to be understated by the passing of time: the upward trend in average temperatures; the rate of increase in sea level. Some important parameters have been subject to better testing as measurement techniques have improved and numbers of observations increased. On these, too, the mainstream science's hypotheses have been confirmed: the warming of the troposphere and the cooling of the stratosphere and the long-term shift towards wet extremes and hot extremes.Availability: (1)

Transforming rural land use /

by Garnaut, Ross | Garnaut Climate Change Review.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Garnaut Climate Change Review update paper ; no. 4, 2011.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 50-58Summary: Australia has always been a country of climate extremes. The health of Australian farming will continue to depend on effective management of weather and climate uncertainty. It is increasingly clear that the world is moving towards more rapid and severe climate change. The science is telling us that climate change will be associated with significant warming, which will change optimal planting and harvesting times and the crops, cultivars and animal types that do well in each region. It will reduce water run-off even if there is no general effect on rainfall, and so reduce water available from rivers and streams for irrigation. It is likely to increase the intensity of extreme events: heatwaves and associated bushfires; cyclones in tropical regions; episodes of exceptionally high rainfall; and drought. The impacts of accelerating climate change will intensify the climatic challenge to rural Australia. The scientific evidence is considered in Update Paper five (The science of climate change). Land use planning will need to identify the range of future climate change risks and to consider how best to take these into account. Increasingly, farmers will need to understand and actively manage these risks to ensure the success of their activities in a changing climate.Availability: (1)

Transforming the electricity sector /

by Garnaut, Ross | Garnaut Climate Change Review.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Garnaut Climate Change Review update paper ; no. 8, 2011.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 54-59Summary: This paper discusses the impact of the carbon price on changes in electricity supply over time, and on prices. The effects of other sources of price increases are also examined?both those that are unavoidable, and those that may be the result of regulatory and structural imperfections in the National Electricity Market. There are signs that lower growth in demand is reducing the need for investment. In addition, improving the regulation of the electricity market would reduce pressures for price increases. It is possible that these developments could go a long way towards offsetting the addition to electricity prices of the introduction of a carbon price.Availability: (1)

Weighing the cost and benefits of climate change action /

by Garnaut, Ross | Garnaut Climate Change Review.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Garnaut Climate Change Review update paper ; no. 1, 2011.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 28-29Summary: This is the first of eight update papers that will focus on new developments and consider whether the case for the conclusions drawn in 2008 has been strengthened or weakened. Individual papers will examine progress on: international mitigation efforts; global emissions trends; the climate science; opportunities for abatement in the land sector and biosequestration; proposals for reducing emissions, including different carbon price instruments; technology developments and innovation policy; and the electricity sector.Availability: (1)

Hosted by Prosentient