Brotherhood of St Laurence

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'It has to be more than a job' : a search for exceptional practice with troubled adolescents. /

by Clark, Robin.

Publisher: Malvern, Vic. Deakin Human Services Australia, Deakin University 2000Description: iv, 50 p.Notes: Bibliography: p. 43-47Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Assessing, training and recruiting Indigenous carers. /

by Higgins, J. R | Butler, N.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cover title. "National Child Protection Clearinghouse' -- T.p. verso "This project was conducted as a collaboration between the Australian Institute of Family Studies and the Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care".Summary: In booklet 2, Assessing, training and recruiting Indigenous carers, specific programs that assess and train Indigenous general and kinship carers are profiled, and a model of how successful organisations have conducted effective carer recruitment, based on the findings from Phase 1, is also included.Availability: (1)

Barriers, incentives and strategies to enchance [enhance] recruitment of Indigenous carers : perspectives of professionals from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, non-government agencies and government /

by Bromfield, Leah M | Higgins, Jenny R | Higgins, Daryl J.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cover title. Includes bibliographical references (p. 7)Summary: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders? commitment to community is supported by complex personal, family and social obligations of kinship relations that have been central to the economic, social and spiritual life of Indigenous communities for many thousands of years. Yet even with intensive recruitment efforts, organisations have been unable to recruit sufficient Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers to meet demand. In response to a shortage of Indigenous carers, some Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander agencies have developed innovative strategies to overcome recruitment barriers and recruit new carers.Availability: (1)

Care-system impacts on academic outcomes : research report /

by Wise, Sarah | Anglicare Victoria. Social Policy and Research Unit | Pollock, Sarah | Mitchell, Gaye | Argus, Cathy | Farquhar, Peta.

Publisher: Collingwood ; Melbourne Anglicare Victoria and Wesley Mission Victoria 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2010 Bibliography : p. 58-61 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Children in out-of-home care are changing schools often, repeating grades, dropping out early and suffering higher rates of mental and physical health conditions which limit their participation at school. Despite the importance of a quality education, children and youth who live away from the families of their birth parents are known to experience poor education outcomes compared to children and young people in the community generally. Although Australian research is somewhat limited, the findings are unequivocal; children in out-of-home care perform academically below what is normal for their age, are at risk of disengaging or are disengaged from school and often don t achieve any academic qualification.Availability: (1)

Characteristics of promising Indigenous out-of-home care programs and services. /

by Higgins, J. R | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Butler, N.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cover title. "National Child Protection Clearinghouse' -- T.p. verso "This project was conducted as a collaboration between the Australian Institute of Family Studies and the Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care".Summary: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people continue to suffer the intergenerational effects of past welfare practices including the forced removal of their children and dislocation from their communities, country and culture. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people also experience higher levels of poverty and social disadvantage than non-Indigenous Australians. The combined effects of past practices and current disadvantages present Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities with extreme challenges in supporting families to ensure children stay safe and are cared for appropriately. ; In booklet 1, Characteristics of promising Indigenous out-of-home care programs and services, common characteristics of the organisations' programs and services that we profiled are outlined. These cover two areas: organisational practice and service delivery.Availability: (1)

Children and the state : social control and the formation of Australian child welfare. /

by Van Krieken, Robert.

Publisher: North Sydney, N.S.W. Allen & Unwin 1992Description: 173 p. Bibliography: p. 146-165. Includes index.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Children in out-of-home care in Australia : international comparisons /

by Tilbury, Clare | Thoburn, June.

Publisher: 2008Availability: No items available

Children with complex needs : perspectives of professionals from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, non-government agencies and government departments. /

by Higgins, Jenny R | Higgins, Daryl J | Bromfield, Leah M.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cover title. Includes bibliographical references (p. 6)Availability: (1)

Closed worlds : reflections on institutional care and child slavery in Australia /

by Hil, Richard | Penglase, Joanna | Smith, Gregory.

Publisher: 2008Availability: No items available

Collaboration or conflict : women in foster care. /

by Smith, Brenda | Smith, Tim.

Publisher: 1990Description: p. 146-166.Notes: Rec. no. for book: B2974 indexed chapterAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Comparing caring : the looking after children system in Canada and Australia /

by Cheers, Deirdre | Kufeldt, Kathleen | Klein, Ross | Rideout, Scott.

Publisher: 2007Availability: No items available

Comprehensive support for Indigenous carers and young people. /

by Higgins, J. R | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Butler, N.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2007; Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cover title. "National Child Protection Clearinghouse' -- T.p. verso "This project was conducted as a collaboration between the Australian Institute of Family Studies and the Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care".Summary: In booklet 3, Comprehensive support for Indigenous carers and young people, programs that offer comprehensive support for carers and young people are profiled in detail.Availability: (1)

Defining well-being for Indigenous children in care /

by McMahon, Anthony | Reck, Lucinda | Walker, Malcolm.

Publisher: 2007Availability: No items available

Financial and non-financial support to formal and informal out of home carers : final report /

by McHugh, Marilyn | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Valentine, Kylie.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre 2011Description: PDF.Other title: University of New South Wales, Social Policy Research Centre..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2011 Bibliography : pp. 113-120Summary: Out-of-home carers can be any person caring, wholly or substantially, for a dependent child in their residence who is not their legal responsibility as a parent. There are two main types of carers : formal (statutory) and informal (non-statutory). Formal carers are predominantly foster carers (non-related to the child) or kinship/relative carers (related to the child). In Victoria, children are also placed in permanent care, when a permanent care order is made by the Children's Court. Informal carers are mainly grandparent carers. Out-of-home care (OOHC) in Australia is the responsibility of child welfare departments in the eight states and territories and is one of a range of services provided to children and young people who are in need of care and protection. Out-of-home care services are provided by child welfare departmental agencies and/or by non-government organisations (NGO). The main form (94 per cent) of out-of-home care for children and young people (under 18 years of age) is a home-based placement in foster or kinship/relative care. Residential care (4.8 per cent) is the other most utilised out-of-home care placement option. (From the executive summary)Availability: (1)

Foster carers in New South Wales: profile and projections based on ABS census data. /

by Siminski, Peter | Chalmers, Jenny | McHugh, Marilyn.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2005Description: PDF.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Foster their culture : caring for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in out-of-home care /

by Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care.

Publisher: North Fitzroy, Vic SNAICC 2008Description: 70 p. ; 30 cm.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Improving housing outcomes for young people leaving state out of home care /

by Johnson, Guy | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute | Natalier, Kristin | Bailey, Naomi.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2009Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute [AHURI]..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2009 Bibliography : p. 46-51 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: The problems facing young people leaving state out-of-home care are among the more pressing issues facing Australian policy-makers today. The number of young people in out-of-home care placements in Australia has almost doubled in the last decade, with over 28,000 children and young people currently in formal out-of-home care placements . Each year about 8,000 young people are discharged from care. The majority (78 per cent) leave care before they are 15 and many of these young people return to their family homes. However, some do not.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Protecting Australia's children research audit (1995-2010) : Final report /

by McDonald, Myfanwy | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Higgins, Daryl | Valentine, Kylie | Lamont, Alister.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011 Bibliography : p. 51-52Summary: The purpose of this audit is to identify, describe and disseminate information about Australian research projects (including program evaluations) undertaken during the 1995-2010 period on topics relating to the protection of children. This audit covers a broad scope of topics, ranging from universal preventative initiatives through to statutory child protection and out-of-home care -- Executive summaryAvailability: (1)

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