Brotherhood of St Laurence

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A minimum income standard for the UK in 2011 /

by Hirsch, Donald | Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Publisher: London, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2011 Bibliography : p. 22Summary: This report is JRF's annual update of the 'minimum income standard', based on what members of the public think people need to achieve a socially acceptable standard of living. The 2011 figures reflect price increases and the effect of changing tax and benefit rates.Availability: (1)

Addressing locational disadvantage effectively /

by Ware, Vicki-Ann | Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute. Research ynthesis Service | Gronda , Hellene | Vitis, Laura.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Commissioned by Housing New South Wales August 2010 Appendices : p. 51-100 Bibliography : p. 101-103Summary: This report is the final output of a synthesis examining the nature of locational disadvantage and ways in which governments can intervene to improve the lives of disadvantaged residents in areas of concentrated poverty and disadvantage. The report outlines the synthesis methodology used, then explores the complex and contested concept of locational disadvantage. This is followed by discussion of some interventions used in the US, UK and EU to improve the life chances of residents of disadvantaged areas, leading to conclusions about broad principles for achieving lasting improvements.Availability: (1)
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Assessing the economic benefits of digital inclusion /

by Digital Inclusion Initiative.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Infoxchange Australia 2009Description: p. 16.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Constrained by cost or a lack of knowledge, and often both a significant number of disadvantaged people are missing out on the basic tools that engender participation in modern life. This 'digital divide' has a significant, negative impact on the communities it affects, by limiting their access to information, employment and social networks. On the upside, however, bridging this divide has genuine, measurable benefits for individuals and the broader community. This paper demonstrates the scale of these benefits, and makes a strong case for expanding the process of 'digital inclusion' to other disadvantaged areas of Australia.Availability: (1)

Child and working-age poverty from 2010 to 2020 /

by Brewer, Mike | Institute for Fiscal Studies | Browne, James | Joyce, Robert.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Fiscal Studies 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2011 Bibliography pp. 59-61 Appendices pp. 33-58Summary: This Commentary presents forecasts of relative and absolute income poverty in the UK among children and working-age adults for each year between 2010-11 and 2015-16, and for 2020-21, using a static microsimulation model augmented with forecasts of key economic and demographic characteristics. It updates and extends previous JRF funded work by Mike Brewer and Robert Joyce, which forecast poverty through to 2013-14, and builds on previous ESRC-funded work by Mike Brewer, James Browne and Wenchao Jin, which simulated the impact of Universal Credit on household incomes.Availability: (1)

Consumer confidence and market experience study 2010 - 2011 /

by Consumer Affairs Victoria.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Consumer Affairs Victoria 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This document presents the findings of the third Consumer Confidence and Market Experience Study commissioned by Consumer Affairs Victoria. The study follows on from the 2008 Consumer Confidence and Market Experience Study and 2006 Consumer Detriment Study. The purpose of the Consumer Confidence and Market Experience Study is to determine the level of consumer confidence in the consumer protection framework, and examine the experience of consumers in the market, including incidences of detriment.Availability: (1)

Creating accessible journeys /

by Victorian Council of Social Service.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Victorian Council of Social Service 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2011 Bibliography p. 55 Appendices pp. 52-55Summary: This report has been produced by the Victorian Council of Social Service (VCOSS) to examine the progress towards improving the public transport system in Victoria to meet the needs of a greater variety of users, including people with diverse mobility requirements. It builds upon information collated for our previous report of the Accessible Public Transport Watch Project, which surveyed the mobility needs of people with disabilities. This report uses information from that report, combined with interviews with public transport agencies, the results of a public consultation forum on accessible transport, and relevant academic publications to draw its conclusions. While the total transport system also includes private motor vehicles, taxis, aviation, shipping, active transport modes and community transport services, this report concentrates upon land-based scheduled public transport passenger services and related pedestrian movement in Victoria: i.e. buses, trains, trams and coaches.Availability: (1)

CSR and banks : the role that banks could and should play in addressing financial exclusion /

by Wilson, Therese | Brotherhood of St Laurence. Research and Policy Centre.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Social Inclusion and Corporate Responsibility Workshop Proceedings 21 November 2008Summary: Discusses the problem of financial exclusion in Australia and considers the role that banking corporations could and should play in assisting to address financial exclusion, on the basis of their corporate social responsibilities.Availability: (1)

End the decay : the cost of poor dental health and what should be done about it /

by Richardson, Bronwyn | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Richardson, Jeff.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 22-23Summary: This study commissioned by the Brotherhood of St Laurence provides an overview of the economic costs of poor dental health and an assessment of who is bearing those costs, and outlines some options for reforming the dental health system to provide more accessible care for disadvantaged Australians.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Evaluation of Saver Plus past participants 2011 /

by Russell, Roslyn | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Wall, Lauren | Doan, Minh Phuong.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited 2011; Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: 56 p.: ill. col. tables.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Saver Plus is an initiative of the Brotherhood of St Laurence and ANZ. The program is funded by ANZ and the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, with ANZ providing matched savings for participants. The program is delivered in partnership with The Smith Family, The Benevolent Society and Berry Street. Local community organisations also deliver Saver Plus including Anglicare SA, Anglicare WA, BGT, Bethany Community Support, Jewish Care Victoria and Haven. Bibliography : p. 55Summary: This report provides evaluation results of saving and money management behaviour of past Saver Plus participants enrolled in the program from 2006 to 2009.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).

Evaluation of the Saver Plus pilot phase 2 : final report /

by Russell, Roslyn | RMIT University | Mihajilo, Sandra | Nair, Aruna.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. RMIT Business 2006Description: 90 p. : ill.Other title: Saver Plus : encouraging savings and increasing financial.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2006Summary: Saver Plus is a program designed to help families on low income improve their levels of financial literacy, develop a savings habit and build assets for educational purposes. The program is an initiative of the ANZ Bank and the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) and has been implemented through partnerships with Berry Street Victoria, The Benevolent Society and The Smith Family. This document presents the results of the second savings period of the Saver Plus pilot program that ran from October 2004 to December 2005 in four locations: Frankston (the Brotherhood of St Laurence), Shepparton (Berry Street Victoria), Campbelltown, NSW (The Benevolent Society), and South East Queensland (The Smith Family).Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2), BSL Archives (1).

Evaluation of the Saver Plus pilot project : interim focus group report /

by Russell, Roslyn | RMIT University | Fredline, Liz | Nair, Aruna.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. RMIT Business 2005Description: 26 p. : ill.Other title: Saver Plus progress and perspectives : evaluation of the.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2005Summary: This report presents findings from focus groups conducted as part of the interim evaluation of the Saver Plus program in October 2004. Saver Plus is a pilot program aimed at assisting families on low-income to reach a savings goal and develop a savings habit. The program has been developed through a partnership between ANZ and the Brotherhood of St Laurence (BSL) and is being implemented through subsequent partnerships with Berry Street Victoria and The Benevolent Society, New South Wales. The pilot is being delivered in three locations: Frankston, Victoria (BSL); Shepparton Victoria (Berry Street Victoria) and Campbelltown, NSW (The Benevolent Society) with 268 participants. The program was launched in 2003 and the first phase of the pilot will be completed in February 2005.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

Evaluation of the Saver Plus pilot project : interim report /

by Russell, Roslyn | RMIT University | Fredline, Liz.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. RMIT Business 2004Description: 26 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2004 Saver Plus progress and perspectives : Evaluation of the Saver Plus pilot project : interim report (Cover title)Summary: This document is an interim report that will provide a progress review of the first stage of the Saver Plus program. We would like to acknowledge the assistance of the Saver Plus research reference group in providing valuable input, discussion and guidance. The participants who have joined the program between July 2003 and the end of March 2004 have provided the data included in the report. We are grateful for their willingness to be involved in the research. Staff who are implementing and running the program have also provided valuable information, we thank them for their time in participating in the research. The evaluation has been funded by ANZ and both ANZ and Brotherhood of St Laurence have provided significant background information useful for the research efforts.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

Financial capability, income and psychological wellbeing /

by Taylor, Mark | University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic esearch | Jenkins, Stephen | Sacker, Amanda.

Publisher: Essex, U.K. University of Essex. Institute for Social and Economic Research. 2011Description: PDF.Other title: ISER working paper series ; no. 2011-18.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2011 Bibliography pp. 25-28Summary: We examine whether financial capability has impacts on psychological health independent of income and financial resources more generally using a nationally representative survey. British Household Panel Survey data are used to construct a measure of financial capability, which we relate to respondents psychological health using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire. We find that financial capability has significant and substantial effects on psychological health over and above those associated with income and material wellbeing more generally. The sizes of these impacts are considerably larger than those associated with changes in household income. Furthermore having low financial capability exacerbates the psychological costs associated with unemployment and divorce.Availability: (1)

Financial literacy, retirement planning, and household wealth /

by van Rooij, Maarten | De Nederlandsche Bank | Lusardi, Annamaria | Alessie, Rob.

Publisher: Amsterdam De Nederlandsche Bank 2011Description: PDF.Other title: De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB) working paper ; no. 313.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2011 Bibliography pp. 24-28 Appendices pp. 29-49Summary: There is ample empirical evidence documenting widespread financial illiteracy and limited pension knowledge. At the same time, the distribution of wealth is widely dispersed and many workers arrive on the verge of retirement with few or no personal assets. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between financial literacy and household net worth, relying on comprehensive measures of financial knowledge designed for a special module of the DNB (De Nederlandsche Bank) Household Survey. Our findings provide evidence of a strong positive association between financial literacy and net worth, even after controlling for many determinants of wealth. Moreover, we discuss two channels through which financial literacy might facilitate wealth accumulation. First, financial knowledge increases the likelihood of investing in the stock market, allowing individuals to benefit from the equity premium. Second, financial literacy is positively related to retirement planning, and the development of a savings plan has been shown to boost wealth. Overall, financial literacy, both directly and indirectly, is found to have a strong link to household wealth.Availability: (1)

Getting what we deserve? Attitudes to pay, reward and desert : interim report /

by Lanning, Tess | Institute for Public Policy Research | Lawton, Kayte.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011 Bibliography : pp. 36-38Summary: This report investigates the role of pay as reward or recognition for different kinds of work, skills and outcomes. Drawing on polling and extensive qualitative research, it considers how the functioning of pay is currently perceived and what the appropriate foundations for improvement might be.Availability: (1)

He said, she said : the gender wage gap according to self and proxy reports in the current population survey /

by Reynolds, Jeremy | Wenger, Jeffrey.

Publisher: Athens, GA University of Georgia 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2011 Bibliography pp. 38-40Summary: Roughly half the labor force data in the Current Population Survey (CPS) are provided by proxy respondents, and since 1979, men's reliance on proxies has dropped dramatically while women's reliance on proxies has increased. Few authors, however, have examined how combining these first-hand and second-hand reports may influence our understanding of long-term economic trends. We exploit the outgoing rotation group structure of the CPS by matching individual records one year apart, and we find that self-reported wages are higher than proxy-reported wages even after controlling for all time invariant characteristics. Furthermore, we find that changes in the use of proxy respondents by men and women since 1979 have made current estimates of the gender wage gap larger than they would have been without changes in reporting status. This suggests that the gender wage gap has closed more than previously estimated. We recommend that researchers combine self and proxy responses with great care, especially when analyzing time trends or making gender comparisons.Availability: (1)

Is the European welfare state really more expensive? : Indicators on social spending, 1980-2012; and a manual to the OECD social expenditure database (SOCX) /

by Adema, Willem | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development | Fron, Pauline | Ladaique, Maxime.

Publisher: Paris, France Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 2011Description: PDF.Other title: OECD social, employment and migration working papers ; no. 124.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2011 Part I Bibliography p. 35 Part II Bibliography p. 115-118Summary: Part I of this paper first presents information on trends and composition of social expenditure as in the OECD Social Expenditure database for the years 1980 - 2007. Over this period, public social expenditure as a percentage of GDP, on average across OECD, increased from 15.6% to 19.2%. Public pension spending (6.4% of GDP) and public health expenditure (5.8% of GDP) are the largest social spending items. Part I also presents social expenditure indicators that account for the effects of the tax system as well as indicators on private social expenditure. Including both of these features alters country rankings by level of social spending and leads to a convergence of spending-to-GDP ratios across countries. Based on this broader measure net total social expenditure as a percent of GDP at factor costs in 2007 was highest in France and Belgium, at 30% of GDP, and between 22 and 28% of GDP in Austria, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Portugal, the United Kingdom and the United States. Part II of this paper presents the OECD SOCX Manual. It starts with a discussion of methodological, classification and data issues regarding the gross spending items as in SOCX. It also looks at the methodological aspects of measuring net social expenditure, and presents information on how relevant estimates were derived. Accounting for the effect of the tax system and private social expenditure leads to greater similarity in social expenditure-to-GDP ratios across countries and to a reassessment of the magnitude of welfare states. After accounting for the impact of taxation and private benefits, social expenditure amounts to over 30% of GDP at factor cost in Belgium and France; social expenditure also ranges within a few percentage points of each other in Austria, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Portugal, the United Kingdom and the United States.Availability: (1)

Just get over it : the cost of living in Australia /

by Soutphommasane, Tim | Per Capita.

Publisher: Surry Hills, N.S.W. Per Capita 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2011 Bibliography pp. 27-29Summary: This paper investigates the cost of living in Australia, an issue that has dominated recent political debate. It evaluates whether cost of living complaints are justified in light of economic reality and household consumption patterns. It considers how governments should respond to cost of living issues. While much public discourse suggests there is a generalised cost of living crisis, the reality is less alarming. Inflation figures indicate only a modest increase in the cost of living, even when adjusted to include mortgage interest and consumer credit charges. While the cost of some essential items have experienced price rises that exceed the CPI, with particularly negative effects on those on fixed and low incomes, these must be considered in light of the full economic context. Wage growth, low unemployment and higher household savings levels all indicate a disproportionate level of concern about the rising cost of living. Australian households are, on average, better off now than they ever have been.Availability: (1)

Many faces of saving : social dimensions of Saver Plus /

by Bodsworth, Eve | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Australia and New Zealand Banking Group Limited 2011; Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: 48 p.: ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Saver Plus is an initiative of the Brotherhood of St Laurence and ANZ. The program is funded by ANZ and the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, with ANZ providing matched savings for participants. The program is delivered in partnership with The Smith Family, The Benevolent Society and Berry Street. Local community organisations also deliver Saver Plus including Anglicare SA, Anglicare WA, BGT, Bethany Community Support, Jewish Care Victoria and Haven.Summary: A small qualitative study of Saver Plus, a matched savings program designed to assist low-income Australians to build assets and improve their financial capability, explored the social and economic context in which the participants attempted to save money and manage their finances. It also shed light on the constraints to saving faced by individuals and families. The study includes recommendations for improving the Saver Plus program, and for broader policy reform.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Measuring financial exclusion in Australia, May 2011 /

by Hems, Les | Centre for Social Impact | Connolly, Chris | Wolfson, Lew | Georgouras, Meiko | Sultana, Saida.

Publisher: Kensington, N.S.W. University of New South Wales. Centre for Social Impact 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011 Published for the National Australia Bank Bibliography pp. 30-31Summary: The primary objective of this research is to define and deepen understanding of financial exclusion in Australia and its relationship with social and economic disadvantage. The research benefitted from unique access to some of Australia's largest stores of private data. We were able to combine access to the Roy Morgan Single Source Survey, consisting of over 50,000 interviews per annum, with access to the de-identified banking records of several million NAB customers, in addition to other data sources. As a result, this study is certainly the largest and most detailed examination of financial exclusion that has been undertaken in Australia, and one of the largest studies of this type in the world.Availability: (1)

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