Brotherhood of St Laurence

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A picture of Australia's children 2009 /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This report delivers the latest information on how, as a nation, we are faring according to key indicators of child health, development and wellbeing. Death rates among children have fallen dramatically, and most children are physically active and meet minimum standards for reading and numeracy. But it is not all good news. Rates of severe disability and diabetes are on the rise. Too many children are overweight or obese, or are at risk of homelessness, and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children fare worse on most key indicatorsAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Are social marketing campaigns effective in preventing child abuse and neglect? /

by Horsfall, Briony | Australian Institute of Family Studies. National Child rotection Clearinghouse | Bromfield, Leah | McDonald, Myfanwy.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Institute of Family Studies. National Child.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 26-28Summary: Social marketing campaigns are a common strategy for raising awareness about social problems such as child abuse and neglect. However, questions have been raised about the role social marketing campaigns could play, and their potential efficacy in the prevention of child abuse and neglect and in supporting vulnerable children and families. In this NCPC Issues paper, evidence for the impact of media-based social marketing campaigns related to child protection, parenting and child abuse prevention are examined.Availability: (1)

Australian Temperament Project. /

by Australian Institute of Family Studies. Australian Temperament Project.

Publisher: Melbourne Australian Institute of Family Studies 2006Online Access: website Notes: Description based on contents viewed : 23 May 2006 Mode of access : WORLD WIDE WEB ONLINE RESOURCESummary: The Australian Temperament Project (ATP) is a longitudinal study of the psychosocial development of a large and representative sample of Australian children born in the state of Victoria, Australia between September 1982 and January 1983. The study aims to trace the pathways to psychosocial adjustment and maladjustment across the lifespan, and to investigate the contribution of personal, family and environmental factors to development and wellbeing. A major theme throughout has been the influence of an individual's temperament on his/her emotional and behavioural adjustment. The broad issues addressed include: > >the contribution of temperament to a child's emotional, behavioural and school adjustment; > >the impact of family and environmental factors, together with child characteristics, on emotional and behavioural adjustment; > >the factors and processes involved in the progression of childhood behaviour problems (e.g. aggression, hyperactivity, anxiety) to adolescent and adult adjustment difficulties (e.g. antisocial behaviour, substance use, depression); > >genetic influences on temperament and behaviour; > >the development of healthy, socially competent functioning; > >the development of civic mindedness and social responsibility; > >the transition to young adulthood: pathways to occupational and educational participation, the development of interpersonal relationships, and family formation.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Does gender trump money? : housework hours of husbands and wives in Britain /

by Kan, Man Yee.

Publisher: 2008Availability: No items available

Families, life events and family service delivery : a literature review /

by Moloney, Lawrence | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Weston, Ruth | Qu, Lixia | Hayes, Alan.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2012Description: x, 67 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.Other title: Australian Institute of Family Studies [AIFS]. Research.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2012 Includes bibliographical references (p. 57-66)Summary: This report reviews the literature on life events experienced by families and ways in which they prepare for and/or deal with them. It covers factors or triggers that lead families to navigate successfully or unsuccessfully through life events, and then addresses the ways in which such events affect families who have been functioning well and those who were already struggling prior to the event occurring. Finally, the report provides an assessment of service delivery models that aim to support those negotiating a range of life events. ; Contents: Executive summary -- 1. Families in Australia -- 2. Life events and related literature -- 3. Developmental and family templates as influences on life events -- 4. Life events experienced by families -- 5. Issues for service delivery -- 6. Concluding remarks -- 7. References -- 8. Appendix:The Ireland life events websiteAvailability: (1)

Family-related life events : insights from two Australian longitudinal studies /

by Qu, Lixia et al | Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2012 Bibliography : p. 91-92Summary: The report examines the prevalence of different life events among Australian adults, and the links between life events, personal and family characteristics, and personal wellbeing. Life events include such things as family formation or separation, serious illness or bereavement, financial or employment change, or moving house. The report presents insights from two large-scale national longitudinal datasets: the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey - which provides a broad population view - and Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) - which focuses exclusively on families with young children. This report follows on from a literature review on the trends and impacts of life events, published as research report no. 20. ; Executive summary -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Analyses of the HILDA survey data -- 3. Analyses of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children -- 4. Summary of key findings and implications -- Appendices.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).

Female breadwinner families : their existence, persistence and sources. /

by Drago, Robert | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Black, David | Wooden, Mark.

Publisher: [Parkville, Vic.] Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2004Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2004 Includes bibliographical references (p.21-22) This paper reports on the research being conducted as part of the research program, "The Dynamics of Economic and Social Change : an Analysis of the Household, Income and labour Dynamics in Australia Survey".Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Handbook for working with children and youth : pathways to resilience across cultures and contexts /

by Ungar, Michael.

Publisher: London, U.K. Sage Publications 2005Description: xxxix, 511 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.Other title: Pathways to resilience across cultures and contexts.Summary: "The Handbook for Working With Children and Youth: Pathways to Resilience Across Cultures and Contexts examines lives lived well despite adversity. Calling upon some of the most progressive thinkers in the field, it presents a collection of original writing on the theories, methods of study, and interventions that promote resilience. Unlike other works that have left largely unquestioned their own culture-bound interpretations of the ways children and youth survive and thrive, this volume explores the multiple paths children follow to health and well-being in diverse national and international settings. It demonstrates the connection between social and political health resources and addresses the more immediate concerns of how those who care for children create the physical, emotional, and spiritual environments in which resilience is nurtured." ; "Academics, graduate students, and professionals studying or working in human service fields such as human development and family studies, education, social work, child and youth care work, developmental psychology/applied developmental science, child psychiatry, nursing, and family therapy will benefit from this Handbook. In essence, anyone who works with youth or is interested in the developmental issues related to children and youth in clinical, residential, or community settings will find Ungar's Handbook to be of great value."--BOOK JACKET.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Intra-household time allocation : gender differences in caring for children /

by Garc a-Mainar, Inmaculada | Institute for the Study of Labor | Molina, Jos Alberto | Montuenga, V ctor M.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Institute for the Study of Labor 2009Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This paper analyses the intra-household allocation of time to show gender differences in childcare. In the framework of a general efficiency approach, hours spent on childcare by each parent are regressed against individual and household characteristics, for five samples (Denmark, France, Germany, Italy and Spain), with data being drawn from the European Community Household Panel-ECHP (1994-2001). Empirical results show a clear inequality in childcare between fathers and mothers, with this being more evident in Mediterranean countries. Panel data estimates reveal that, in general, caring tasks are mainly influenced by the presence of young children in the household, by the total non-labor income, and by the ratio of mothers' non-labor income to family's non-labor income, with this latter variable exhibiting a different behavior across genders and across countries.Availability: (1)

Parent blaming in child protection and health settings : a matter for concern /

by Hansen, Patricia | Ainsworth, Frank.

Publisher: 2007Availability: No items available

Parental divorce and adult family, social and psychological outcomes : the contribution of childhood family adversity /

by Rodgers, Bryan | Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs | Gray, Patricia | Davidson, Tanya | Butterworth, Peter.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2011Description: vi, 47 p. : ill.Other title: Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 43-47Summary: This paper uses data from the Personality and Total Health (PATH) Through Life Project to examine differences in outcomes for children from divorced compared with intact families of origin. The data cover a broad range of adult outcomes relating to family, social and psychological factors and responses to 17 items on childhood family adversity factors experiencedAvailability: (1)

The costs of child poverty for individuals and society : a literature review /

by Griggs, Julia | Joseph Rowntree Foundation | Walker, Robert.

Publisher: Bonn, Germany Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The role of spirituality in social and emotional wellbeing initiatives : the family wellbeing program at Yarrabah /

by McEwan, Alexandra et al.

Publisher: Casuarina, N.T. Copoerative Research Centre for Aboriginal Health 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This paper explores the role that spirituality plays in social and emotional wellbeing for one group of Indigenous Australians by considering the outcomes of the Family Wellbeing (FWB) empowerment program, as reported by participants from Yarrabah, an Indigenous community located in far north Queensland. ; Analysis of 38 semi-structured evaluation interviews conducted with FWB participants in 2003 and 2005 demonstrated that the program outcomes, including improved relationships with family, increased empathy, a sense of calm and peace and a sense of healing, resonated very strongly with contemporary concepts of spirituality. The feelings, attitudes and behaviours reported by participants are also closely linked to ?the control factor? ? recognised as an important psychological variable in epidemiological patterns of disease ? and several personal and social factors that have been identified as protective against suicide and other self-destructive behaviours.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Through black eyes : a handbook of family violence in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. /

by Sam, Maryanne | Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care | Secretariat of the National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. SNAICC 1992Description: 67 p.Notes: Appendices contain a list of organisations which can be of assistance in cases of family violence.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Work and worklessness in deprived neighbourhoods /

by Cole, Ian et al.

Publisher: Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This study contrasts policy assumptions about work and worklessness with the personal experiences of residents living in deprived neighbourhoods. ; Recent policy debate has centred on a number of claims about why people do not have jobs and the benefits of employment for individual and family life. This report draws on detailed interviews with residents in deprived neighbourhoods across Britain to reflect on the validity of these assumptions at a time of recession and far-reaching welfare reform. Four key themes are explored: ; how workless residents perceive the availability of work in a recession; ; the experiences of work among residents and how this compares with official claims about the benefits of work; ; how workless parents feel about returning to work, and the impact of employment on family life for those in work; ; the potential for training and education to help workless people enter the labour market or, once in work, to secure better jobs. ; A supporting film - 'Lucky to have a job' - is also available that illustrates issues from the community's perspective in the Welsh town of Amlwch.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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