Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Achieving carbon pollution reduction and a switch to clean energy with carbon pollution pricing, limits and supporting policies : discussion paper /

by Climate Institute.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Climate Institute 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2011Summary: This discussion paper focuses on pollution pricing mechanisms and an approach to setting scheme caps and targets. It comes on the back of recent proposals from Professor Garnaut, ill informed comments from the Coalition on robust governance structures and the release of an economists letter calling for effective pollution pricing.Availability: (1)

Assessing the costs of adaptation to climate change : a review of the UNFCCC and other recent estimates /

by Parry, Martin | International Institute for Environment and Development | Arnell, Nigel | Berry, Pam | Dodman, David.

Publisher: London, U.K. International Institute for Environment and Development 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This book takes another look at the costs of adapting to climate change. The estimates for 2030 used by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change are likely to be substantial under-estimates. Professor Martin Parry and his co-authors look at the estimates from a range of perspectives, and conclude that: the current cost assessments do not include some key sectors, such as ecosystems, energy, manufacturing, retailing, and tourism some of the sectors included have been only partially covered in cost estimates the additional costs of adaptation have sometimes been calculated as 'climate mark-ups' against low levels of assumed investment. In some parts of the world, low levels of investment have led to an adaptation deficit, and this deficit will need to be made good by full funding of development, without which the funding for adaptation will be insufficient. Residual damages also need to be evaluated and reported because not all damages from climate change can be avoided. There is an urgent need for more detailed assessments of these costs, including case studies of costs of adaptation in specific places and sectors. This report aims to demonstrate the need for the further and transparent refinement of cost estimates for responding to climate change.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Carbon emission policies in key economies /

by Australia. Productivity Commission.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australia. Productivity Commission 2011Description: xli, 231 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011 Bibliography : p. 197-231Summary: The Australian Government commissioned this report to help it, and the Multi-Party Climate Change Committee, assess the extent to which key economies are taking action to address climate change. It provides a stocktake of the large number of policy measures in the electricity generation and road transport sectors of the countries studied. And it provides estimates of the burdens associated with these policies in each country and the abatement achieved. While the results are based on a robust methodology, data limitations have meant that some estimates could only be indicative.Availability: (1)

Climate change health impacts in Australia : effects of dramatic CO2 emission reductions /

by Woodruff, Rosalie | Australian Conservation Foundation | Hales, Simon | Butler, Colin | McMichael, Anthony.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Conservation Foundation 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Don't wait for Copenhagen : implications of the international climate change impasse for Australia and APEC /

by Howes, Stephen | Asialink.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. University of Melbourne 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Stephen Howes, ANU Professor of Economics and key contributor to the Garnaut Climate Change Review, says an effective response to climate change requires a mix of unilateral and multilateral action - and individual countries must demonstrate good faith. Just as APEC has promoted unilateral trade liberalisation, it should encourage its member countries to compete with each other to reduce emissions and develop new technologies. Waiting for Copenhagen would do nothing to discourage free-riding countries.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Emission reduction policies and carbon prices in key economies : working paper /

by Australia. Productivity Commission.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australia. Productivity Commission 2011Description: 31 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2011 Bibliography : p. 28-29Summary: Outlines the Commission's approach to a range of methodological issues associated with the study of emissions-reduction policies in key economies.Availability: (1)

Emissions trading : has it worked? /

by Nielson, Leslie.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Parliament of Australia. Parliamentary Library 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Equity and efficiency in cap and trade : effectively managing the emissions allowance supply /

by Morris, Adele | Energy Security Initiative at Brookings.

Publisher: Washington, DC Brookings Institution 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This 32-page paper discusses the likely distributional implications of a U.S. cap-and-trade system and how policymakers could manage these implications by altering the way in which allowances or allowance revenues are distributed throughout the broader economyAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Green taxes and charges : reducing their impact on low-income households. /

by Ekins, Paul | Dresner, Simon.

Publisher: York, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation and Policy Studies Institute 2004Description: HTML.Notes: Bibliography: p. 51-53Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Greenhouse gas emission trading /

by Smith, Stewart.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. NSW Parliamentary Library Research Service 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Investing in a low Carbon Britain /

by HM GOvernment.

Publisher: London, U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Is there a more effective way to reduce carbon emissions? : an alternative to emissions trading and carbon taxation /

by Molyneaux, Lynette | University of Queensland. School of Economics. Energy conomics and Management Group | Foster, John | Wagner, Liam.

Publisher: Brisbane, Qld. University of Queensland. School of Economics. Energy Economics and Management Group (EEMG) 2010Description: PDF.Other title: University of Queensland. School of Economics. Energy.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2010 Bibliography : p. 46-48Summary: Whilst emissions trading systems are widely held to be able to deliver lowest-cost abatement, uncertainty reduces their effectiveness. We consider a new scheme, the Tender-Price Allocation Mechanism, which focuses carbon factor cost expenditure on abatement rather than just revenue transfers. It is a scheme that reduces uncertainty and the costs of uncertainty for both firms and regulators. It also incorporates a suite of incentives that compensates for the externalities associated with abatement investment.Availability: (1)

Low carbon energy : a roadmap /

by Flavin, Christopher.

Publisher: Washington, DC Worldwatch Institute 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Plugging the gap : an easy guide to a safe climate future /

by World Wildlife Fund (WWF) International.

Publisher: Gland, Switzerland World Wildlife Fund (WWF) International 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: August 2010 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: This paper provides climate negotiators and decision makers in governments with an easy guide to a safe climate future, by examining different ways to plug the gigatonne gap. It explains how to manage the global carbon budget effectively, and that there are more than enough options to choose from for plugging the gigatonne gap that currently puts us at risk of overspending our remaining carbon budget. The earlier we start, the more we will benefit. Every additional year of delay beyond 2010 adds another USAvailability: (1)

Scorecards on best and worst policies for a green new deal /

by Hohne, Niklas et al | Ecofys/Germanwatch.

Publisher: World Wildlife Fund 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The clean energy investment agenda : a comprehensive approach to building the low carbon economy /

by Podesta, John D | Gordon, Kate | Hendricks, Bracken.

Publisher: Washington, DC Centre for American Progress 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The economics of 350 : the benefits and costs of climate stabilization /

by Ackerman, Frank et al.

Publisher: Economics for Equity and Environment 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The economics of climate change mitigation : policies and options for global action beyond 2012 : executive summary /

Publisher: Paris, France OECD Publications 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Against the background of a projected doubling of world greenhouse gas emissions by mid-century, this book explores feasible ways to abate them at least cost. Through quantitative analysis, it addresses key climate policy issues: ; What would an ideal set of climate policy tools look like? ; How large are the economic and environmental costs of incomplete country or sector coverage of climate change mitigation policies? What are the pros and cons of policy tools to broaden that coverage, such as international sector-wide agreements or border-tax adjustments? What are the main challenges in incorporating a mechanism to reduce emissions from deforestation and forest degradation? ; How can we concretely develop a global carbon market? ; What is the case for, and what can we reasonably expect from, R&D and technology support policies? ; How great are the incentives for major emitting countries to join a climate change mitigation agreement, in terms of the costs and benefits (including the co-benefits from reduced local air pollution and improved energy security) of action? How can they be enhanced? How can international transfers of resources and technologies broaden support for action?Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The UK low carbon industrial strategy /

by HM Governmemt.

Publisher: London, U.K. Department of Energy and Climate Change 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The warm-up /

by Bradley, William | DEMOS | Smith, Peter.

Publisher: London, U.K. DEMOS 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 2012 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: The UK's housing stock is ageing, thermally inefficient and in some instances hazardous. Dramatic levels of capital investment will be needed to improve these deficiencies to support efforts to eradicate fuel poverty and significantly reduce our residential energy demand and carbon emissions. Emissions from the domestic housing sector account for just under a third of the UK?s total carbon emissions, and therefore reducing this level is an important element in the strategy to meet our legally binding emissions reduction target. At the same time, fuel-poor households generally consume less energy than more affluent households and at the same time occupy energy inefficient homes. Consequently, and inevitably, higher energy prices have a disproportionate impact on the poorest households and the vulnerable, who are also constrained by their limited access to the competitive energy market. How the UK adapts to these challenges and introduces suitably ambitious and effective policies will play a key role in protecting households from inevitable energy price increases.Availability: (1)

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