Brotherhood of St Laurence

Your search returned 173 results.

Not what you expected? Check for suggestions
Early childhood education : pathways to quality and equity for all children /

by Elliott, Alison | Australian Council for Educational Research.

Publisher: Camberwell, Vic. Australian Council for Educational Research 2006Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)

Early childhood longitudinal study. /

by National Centre for Education Statistics.

Publisher: 07/22/2003 16:02:03http://www.nces.ed.gov/ecls/ 2003Notes: Description based on contents viewed : 07/22/2003 Mode of access : WORLD WIDE WEB ONLINE RESOURCESummary: Cataloguer's description: The Early Childhood Longitudinal Study (ECLS) Program provides national data on children's status at birth and at various points thereafter; children's transitions to nonparental care, early education programs, and school; and children's experiences. ECLS also provides data to test hypotheses about the effects of a wide range of family, school, community and individual variables on children's development, early learning and early performance in school.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Early childhood teachers and qualified staff . /

by Warrilow, Prue | Fisher, Karen | Cummings, Katherine.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2002Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.sprc.unsw.edu.au/reports/EarlyChildhoodTeachersRevisedApril04.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:23:27 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Early days, much promise : an evaluation of the Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) in Australia

by Gilley, Tim | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2003Description: vi, 22 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: November 2003 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: This paper reports the evaluation of a program designed to improve children's educational attainment and self-esteem in the early years of school, by equipping and supporting parents to undertake lessons with their four and five-year-old children at home. It describes the program's implementation in the multicultural environment of inner suburban Melbourne, the views of participating staff and parents and the outcomes for children. Learnings to inform futures programs are also identified. ; This paper reports the evaluation of a program designed to improve children's educational attainment and self-esteem in the early years of school, by equipping and supporting parents to undertake lessons with their four and five-year-old children at home. It describes the program's implementation in the multicultural environment of inner suburban Melbourne, the views of participating staff and parents and the outcomes for children. Learnings to inform futures programs are also identified. ; HOME INTERACTION PROGRAM FOR PARENTS AND YOUNGSTERS (HIPPY)Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

Early home learning matters : a brief guide for practioners /

by Roberts, Kim | Family and Parenting Institute.

Publisher: London, U.K. Family and Parenting Institute 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: This is the short companion volume to "Early Home Learning Matters: A good practice guide" by Kim RobertsSummary: This brief guide provides an overview of the key messages for practitioners contained in "Early Home Learning Matters: A good practice guide". This is an essential resource for anyone working with parents of children from birth to five years of age, or developing early years services. The link between social deprivation and poor outcomes for children is well established but, crucially, it is not set in stone. What the evidence also tells us is that when parents provide the experiences that children need for their early development, this has a huge and lasting impact on their future wellbeing and achievement, irrespective of their parents, of material or educational background. Involving and supporting parents by working in partnership is therefore an essential part of early years services.Availability: (1)

Early home learning matters : a brief guide for practitioners /

by Roberts, Kim | Great Britain. Department for Children, Schools and Families.

Publisher: London Family and Parenting Institute 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Title from cover. This short companion to 'Early home learning matters: a good practice guide' ... --introduction. Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: This brief guide provides an overview of the key messages for practitioners contained in Early Home Learning Matters: A good practice guide. This is an essential resource for anyone working with parents of children from birth to five years of age, or developing early years servicesAvailability: (1)

Early learning programs that promote children's developmental and educational outcomes /

by Harrison, Linda J | Australian Institute of Family Studies. Closing the Gap Clearinghouse | Goldfeld, Sharon | Metcalfe, Eliza.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Closing the Gap Clearinghouse 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2012 Resource sheet ; no. 15 Bibliography : p.10-17Availability: (1)

Early learning strategies : final report

by Warrilow, Prue | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Fisher, Karen | Valentine, Kylie.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2004Description: vii, 35 p. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: January 2004 "For Families First, Cumberland Prospect" -- cover; open access - 10/07/2019 Summary: The objective of the Early Learning Project was to increase formal early learning opportunities for children 0-5 years in the Families First Cumberland Prospect Area (Auburn, Baulkham Hills, Blacktown, Holroyd and Parramatta Local Government Areas (LGAs)). Formal early learning opportunities in this context mean structured early learning activities, for children in formal services, informal settings or at home. They might include pre-school, long day care, child care, supported playgroups and other structured child and relationship-centred activities, as well as in-home early learning ideas for families who are house-bound. The aim of the research activities was to map existing opportunities and issues and develop a strategic plan for the following three years. The methodology included a review of local and early learning literature; analysis of the Families First and other data-bases; interviews with key stakeholders and families; and a Service Providers Forum to identify strategies that had been implemented and opportunities for development (referred to as the Forum in this report).Availability: (1)

Early maternal employment and child development in five OECD countries /

by Huerta, M. Carmen | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development | Adema, Willem | Baxter, Jennifer | Corak, Miles.

Publisher: OECD Publishing 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2011 Includes bibliographic references pp. 33-38Summary: More mothers with young children are in paid work than in the past. There is a long-running debate on possible negative effects of maternal employment on child development. For the first time, this paper presents an initial comparative analysis of longitudinal data on maternal employment patterns after birth on child cognitive and behavioural development. The paper examines data of five OECD countries with different types and intensity of support provided to families to reconcile work and family life.Availability: (1)

Education and social inclusion : submission to the Victorian Government's Review of Education and Training legislation. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence (unpub.) 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2005 Summary: In this submission, the Brotherhood of St Laurence focuses on issues that relate to social inclusion and education and that have been drawn from our research and service experience. A key role of education and training is to promote social inclusion in our society. Performance of the education system and individual schools should be assessed by how well they include rather than exclude students.Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Lists:

Empowering parents in Sure Start Local Programmes : national evaluation report /

by Williams, Fiona | Great Britain, Department for Education and Skills | Churchill, Harriet.

Publisher: London Her Majesty's Printer and Controller of HMSO 2006Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2006Summary: study of the development of parent support services and parents' empowerment in Sure Start, an integrated program to promote child development and strengthen families and communities, based on six local case studies that included qualitative, in-depth, and semi-structured interviews with parents, staff, and other local stakeholders, observations, and document analysisAvailability: (1)

Enhancing learning in early childhood within disadvantaged families: Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters /

by Webb, Jill | Gilley, Tim | Mutimer, Annette.

Publisher: unpub. 1999Description: 21p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p.21-22)Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Lists:

Enhancing learning in early childhood within the family : evaluation of practice and theory in a multi-cultural context. /

by Gilley, Tim.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Victoria University 2002Description: 267 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts Victoria Uruversity August 2002Summary: Enhancing learning in early childhood within the family. This thesis provides an analysis of a particular approach to enhancing learning in early childhood within the family. It involves an evaluation of practice and theory in an educationally disadvantaged and multi-cultural community. The Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) has a 30 year history and was introduced into Australia in 1998 by the Brotherhood of St Laurence. It is a two-year intensive program with four and five-year-old children and their families. Current understanding of the importance of learning in the early years, and intensive adult-child communication, explain why programs such as HIPPY which engage parents as teachers of the young children can be effective. Early learning experiences are at home. Later programs in school often appear to be inadequate to redress early disadvantage because they intervene too late and lack the resources to provide the necessary adult-to-child input. The research reported here was an evaluation of the second intake of 33 children (32 families) into HIPPY in Australia. A triangulation research method involved (a) participant observation of the program, (b) interviews with stakeholders, and (c) an assessment of children in the program and in a matched comparison group. Direct testing and teacher assessment of children was undertaken in the areas of general development, literacy, numeracy and school behaviour during the children's first and second years of schooling. The research findings indicated that the program was well implemented at a number of different levels and that the overseas model can be successfully implemented in multi-cultural Australian conditions. The approach to the diverse language backgrounds of families was a major area of successful adaptation from the standard model. Both qualitative and quantitative data analysis indicated that the program enhanced children's school progress. The study identified lessons for future evaluation studies of the program in Australia. The research findings indicate an encouraging start for HIPPY in Australia. In broader terms, the study points to the potential importance to disadvantaged children of well implemented home-based early childhood education programs.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).
Lists:

Evaluating the effectiveness of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) / [journal article]

by Barnett, Tony | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Roost, Fatoumata Diallo | McEachran, Juliet.

Edition: Family Matters no. 91 pp. 27-37Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2012Description: 11 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: This paper uses unit record data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children. The study is conducted in partnership between the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA), the Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS) and the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS). The findings and views reported in this paper are those of the authors and should not be attributed to FaHCSIA, AIFS or the ABS.Summary: Children living in disadvantaged areas are vulnerable to developmental delay. In 2009, the Australian Government commenced the rollout of the Home Interaction Program for Parents and Youngsters (HIPPY) to 50 socially disadvantaged communities across Australia. HIPPY aims to support parents in their role as their four-year-old child’s first teacher, so that their child starts school on an equal footing to that of their more advantaged peers. A two-year quasi-experimental research design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of HIPPY. A propensity score matching technique was used to identify a matched control group from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). Positive effects were found across a number of important developmental domains and spheres of influence, including the child’s cognitive ability and social-emotional adjustment, the parent’s self-efficacy and parenting style, the home learning environment, and the parents’ social connectedness and inclusion. Currently, HIPPY operates as a targeted place-based initiative. But, if the program is to have an impact on reducing social inequalities in child school readiness at the population level, it will need to reach the majority of parents and vulnerable children who are in need of more support and be linked to a universal early childhood education and care platform.Availability: (1)

Evaluation of the early years programme of the Childhood Development Initiative /

by Hayes, Noirin | Childhood Development Initiative | Siraj-Blatchford, Iram | Keegan, Siobhan | Goulding, Eimear.

Publisher: Dublin, Ireland Childhood Development Initiative 2013Description: x, 82 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Inludes bibliographic references pp. 64-72; Principal Investigators: Professor Nóirín Hayes (Centre for Social and Educational Research, Dublin Institute of Technology) and Professor Iram Siraj-Blatchford (Institute of Education, University of London); Lead Researcher: Siobhán Keegan (Centre for Social and Educational Research, Dublin Institute of Technology); and Research Assistant: Eimear Goulding (Centre for Social and Educational Research, Dublin Institute of Technology). Fieldworkers: Jean Kelly, Aisling Joyce, Janet O’Farrell, Síle Murphy, Carla Beattie, Christine O’Farrelly, Aisling Cusack, Tara Lehane, Maria McDermott, Aoife Hickey, Niamh O’Connor, Emma Breen and Cliodhna O’Donovan.Summary: The Early Childhood Care and Education Programme of the Childhood Development Initiative is a 2-year programme targeted at children and their families in Tallaght West. The final report of the evaluation team reports on the baseline, mid-phase and end phase findings for the whole sample of children, parents and childcare services.Availability: (1)

Evaluation of transition : a positive start to school pilots /

by Astbury, Brad | University of Melbourne. Centre for Program Evaluation.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. University of Melbourne. Centre for Program Evaluation 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2009 Bibliography pp. 44-47 Appendices pp. 48-50Summary: The Victorian government's Blueprint for Education and Early Childhood Development, released in September 2008, articulates a vision for Victorian education and early childhood development over the next five years. Improving transitions for children moving between early childhood services and schools is a priority area within the Blueprint, and relates to the goal that: 'By the time Victorian children start school they will be ready to learn at school and schools will be ready for them'.Availability: (1)

Evidence-based practices and programs for early childhood care and education. /

by Groark, Christina J. (ed.) | Mehaffie, Kelly E. (ed.) | McCall, Robert B. (ed.).

Publisher: Thousand Oaks, CA Sage Publications 2007Description: xxiii, 191 p.Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 177-180) and index. Contents: Part I. Evidence-based practices. 1. School readiness : definitions, best practices, assessments and cost / Kelly E. Mehaffie and Jeffery Fraser -- 2. Early intervention practices for children with and at risk for delays / Louise Kaczmarek and Christina J. Groark -- 3. Best practices for transitions into kindergarten / Kelly E. Mehaffie and Mary Wolfson -- Part II. Evidence-based programs. 4. Publicly funded programs and their benefits for children / Wendy M. Barnard -- 5. Demonstration programs and successful outcomes / Wendy M. Barnard and Christina J. Groark -- 6. Home-based and family child care : characteristics and quality issues / Richard Fiene and Martha Woodward Isler -- 7. School-age services : programs that extend the benefits of early care and education services / Suh-Ruu Ou and Arthur J. Reynolds -- 8. Out-of-school-time programs that promote academic and behavioral [behavioural] achievement for children ages six to eight / Anne E. Farber -- Part III. The future of the field. 9. Professional development and higher education systems to develop qualified early childhood educators / Gwen G. Morgan and Jeffery Fraser.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Figuring out the framework : a visual response to the Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework /

by Grinter, Catherine | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Leonard, Lea-Ann.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2010Description: 26 p. : ill.Other title: Family day care framework.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: The Brotherhood of St Laurence would like to thank Family Day Care field workers Catherine Grinter and Lea-Ann Leonard for the development of this document, with contributions from Eileen Buckley, Kim Ferguson, Terri Heard, Linley Kensitt, Daniel Leach and Elizabeth Orr. Bibliography : p. 26 Printed copies of this publication are available from BSL Community Services. A new edition is expected to be released by 2011.Summary: This resource aims to assist early childhood professionals to implement the new Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework and the ; National Childcare Accreditation Council (NCAC) Quality Practices Guide. The release of the Victorian Government?s Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework is an exciting development in the early childhood field. However, this document, alongside other state-based regulations and NCAC quality assurance requirements, can be quite daunting and difficult to understand. This is especially the case for early childhood professionals with English as a second language. Through accessible language and images, this resource demonstrates how many of the core professional practices of Family Day Care carers meet the requirements of both the Victorian Early Years Learning and Development Framework and the NCAC Family Day ; Care Quality Assurance Quality Practices Guide.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (7), BSL Archives (1).

Final report : Family Service Centres evaluation : appendices B, C, D, and E. /

by Dominick, Claire (ed.) | New Zealand. Department of Social Welfare.

Publisher: Wellington, N.Z. Department of Social Welfare 1997Description: vi, 159 p.Notes: See also: Final report : Family Service Centres evaluation [B12583] Final report : Family Service Centres evaluation : the HIPPY program in Family Service Centres : appendix F. [B12585] November 1997Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Lists:

Hosted by Prosentient