Brotherhood of St Laurence

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"When the pressure is really on": the interim report of the income expenditure study : study of changes in income and expenditure among low income families /

by Trethewey, Jenny.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 1986Description: 81 p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The release of this interim report coincides with the 1986/87 Federal Budget. A decline in our national income created by serious trade problems had led the Prime Minister to appeal to all Australians to accept a lower standard of living. Pressure to reduce government spending has intensified with pressure to cut welfare programmes. The Brotherhood of St Laurence has informed the Prime Minister of the serious consequences of these proposals. The preliminary interim findings of a research study on fifty families who are reliant on either a social security income or low wages exemplifies the impact of welfare cuts on poor people. This report describes what it means to be an Australian family living on a low income. In so doing, this report shows that these Australian families just cannot reduce their standard of living any further. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

10 essentials to make Australia fair report . /

Publisher: Redfern, N.S.W. Australian Council of Social Service 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

21 hours : why a shorter working week can help us all to flourish in the 21st century /

by Coote, Anna | New Economics Foundation | Franklin, Jane | Simms, Andrew | Murphy, Mary (ed.).

Publisher: London, U.K. New Economics Foundation 2010Description: 38 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: This report is part of The Great Transition. February 2010 Bibliography : p. 34-36 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This report sets out arguments for a much shorter working week. It proposes a radical change in what is considered 'normal' down from 40 hours or more, to 21 hours. While people can choose to work longer or shorter hours, we propose that 21 hours, or its equivalent spread across the calendar year, should become the standard that is generally expected by government, employers, trade unions, employees, and everyone else.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A decent quality of life : inquiry into the cost of living pressures on older Australians. /

by Australia. Parliament. Senate. Standing Committee on Community Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2008; Canberra, A.C.T. The Senate 2008Description: xviii, 161 p.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aph.gov.au/senate/committee/clac_ctte/older_austs_living_costs/report/index.htm' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:52:46 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response Retirement & ageing; March 2008Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A minimum income standard for Britain in 2009 /

by Hirsch, Donald | Davis, Abigail | Smith, Noel.

Publisher: York, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This study updates 2008 s innovative research, based on what members of the public thought people need for an acceptable minimum standard of living.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

A minimum income standard for the UK in 2010 /

by Davis, Abigail | Joseph Rowntree Foundation | Hirsch, Donald | Smith, Noel.

Publisher: London, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2010Description: 27 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2010 Bibliography : p. 25Summary: JRF's annual update, based on what members of the public think people need to achieve a socially acceptable standard of living. Over time, changes in prices alter the cost of a minimum standard of living, and changes in social norms will change the 'minimum' that is required. This study considers both of these elements, and updates the budgets to April 2010. ; The study reveals: what different family types need to earn to meet the minimum income standard; how much the cost of a minimum household budget has risen over the last decade and since the recession; the effect of tax allowances and tax credit thresholds, and how the recent Budget announcements could affect people on low incomes. ; This research shows that, despite the recession, members of the public involved in this research still believe that as a minimum, people need things that allow them to participate in society.Availability: (1)

A minimum income standard for the UK in 2011 /

by Hirsch, Donald | Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

Publisher: London, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2011 Bibliography : p. 22Summary: This report is JRF's annual update of the 'minimum income standard', based on what members of the public think people need to achieve a socially acceptable standard of living. The 2011 figures reflect price increases and the effect of changing tax and benefit rates.Availability: (1)

A portrait of child poverty in Australia in 1995-96

by Harding, Ann | University of Canberra. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling | Szukalska, Agnieszka.

Publisher: Bruce, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling, University of Canberra 1998Description: 32 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Paper presented at the 6th Australian Institute of Family Studies Conference, Melbourne, 26 November 1998.Summary: In Australia, as in many other developed countries, there has been growing concern about increasing income inequality and a possible accompanying increase in poverty rates. One of the areas of greatest concern is children and how poverty impacts on their well-being (both mental and physical). In this paper the latest ABS income survey data are used to assess the extent of child poverty in Australia in 1995-96. The analysis suggests that most children in poverty in Australia are in that situation because one or both of their parents is unemployed, a sole parent, self-employed or one of the ‘working poor’. Availability: (1)

A snapshot of electricity and gas services and their impact on households seeking emergency relief /

by Victorian Council of Social Service.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Victorian Council of Social Service 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2009 VCOSS would like to express its appreciation to the Consumer Utilities Advocacy Centre (CUAC) for funding this project. Bibliography : p. 32Summary: The purpose of this research is to provide a snapshot of how households accessing emergency relief services experience and manage utilities hardship and to begin a preliminary investigation into whether the current regulatory regime for electricity and gas services in Victoria ensures that these households can maintain access to these essential services. It also includes an investigation of the impact of increased energy costs on low income households.Availability: (1)

A squeeze on spending? An update on household living costs for senior Australians /

by Kelly, Simon | National Seniors Productive Ageing Centre.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. National Seniors Productive Ageing Centre 2013Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2013Summary: A 2011 National Seniors Productive Ageing Centre (NSPAC) research report into the costs of living found that water, electricity, gas, medical services and rent had all risen at more than double the inflation rate over the previous five years.2 This report follows up on that previous report by updating the price increases and examining their impact on the spending patterns of Australia's 2.9 million senior households.3 It focuses on findings for three senior age groups: households aged 75 years and over (75+ households), households aged 65-74 years, and households aged 50-64 years.Availability: (1)

A welfare analysis of climate change mitigation policies /

by de Serres, Alain | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development | Murtin, Fabrice.

Publisher: Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development 2011Description: PDF.Other title: OECD Economics Department. Working paper ; no. 908.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: ECO/WKP(2011)77 December 2011 Bibliography : p. 24-26Summary: This paper assesses some welfare consequences of climate change mitigation policies. In the same vein as Becker, Philipson and Soares (2005), a simple index of economic progress weighs in the monetary cost induced by mitigation policies as well as the health benefits arising from the reduction in local air pollution. The shadow price of pollution is calculated indirectly through its impact on life expectancy. Taking into account the health benefits of mitigation policies significantly reduces their monetary cost in China and India, as well as in countries with large fossil-based energy-producing sectors (Australia, Canada and the United States).Availability: (1)

A welfare perspective on the Accord. /

by Wilson, Kenneth (ed.) | Bradford, Joanne (ed.) | Fitzpatrick, Maree (ed.).

Publisher: 2000Description: p. 51-54.Notes: Rec. no. for book: B10384 indexed chapterAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Accounting for housing costs in regional income comparisons. /

by Siminski, Peter | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Saunders, Peter.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2004Description: 17 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2004 Includes bibliographical references (p. 16-17)Availability: (1)

Advance Australia fair? : trends in small area socio-economic inequality, 2001 to 2006 /

by Ngu Vv, Quoc | National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling | Harding, Ann | Tanton, Rob | Nepal, Binod | Vidyattana, Yogi.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM). University of Canberra 2008Description: PDF.Other title: AMP.NATSEM income and wealth report ; issue 20.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2008Summary: "The 20th AMP.NATSEM Income and Wealth Report, Advance ; Australia Fair?, takes a critical look at trends in income, ; unemployment, immigration and other socio-economic factors ; for different geographic regions of Australia, rather than ; individual Australians - drawing on Census data from 2001 and ; 2006." -- Publisher websiteAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Affordable housing in NSW : past to present. /

by Wilkinson, John.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. NSW Parliamentary Library Research Service 2005Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/prod/parlment/publications.nsf/0/c43281eba16c7f36ca2570c40003081c/Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

All change or plus a change ? The global financial crisis and four key drivers of the world economy. /

by Thirlwell, Mark.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Lowy Institute for International Policy 2009Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.lowyinstitute.org/Publication.asp?pid=977' Checked: 2/06/2009 11:32:09 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseSummary: "It's now common to hear the claim that the global financial crisis will fundamentally change the world economy. In a new paper in the Lowy Institute's Perspectives series, Mark Thirlwell asks whether the changing facts about the world economy - plummeting growth, soaring risk aversion, collapsing commodity prices, and a massive expansion in the role of government are so significant that we have to change our minds about the fundamental ways in which the world now works." -- Publisher website.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Are older Australians being short changed? An analysis of household living costs /

by Kelly, Simon | National Seniors Productive Ageing Centre.

Publisher: Braddon, A.C.T. National Seniors Productive Ageing Centre 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2011 Bibliography p. 23 Appendices pp. 24-28Summary: In this report, we examine how well the consumer price index (CPI) measures inflation for the overall Australian community and how living cost pressures are being distributed throughout the population. We focus mainly on older Australian households (those with the head aged 50 years and over) as many of these households are on low incomes, and spend a large proportion of their budget on essential living cost ("non-discretionary") items. ; HOUSEHOLD, INCOME AND LABOUR DYNAMICS IN AUSTRALIA SURVEY (HILDA)Availability: (1)

Are the low income self-employed poor? /

by Bradbury, Bruce | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 1996Description: 26 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Revised version of a paper presented at the 25th Annual Conference of Economics, ANU, Canberra, 22-26 September 1996. December 1996Availability: (1)

Assessing the quality and inter-temporal comparability of ABS Household Income Distribution Survey Data /

by Siminski, Peter | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Saunders, Peter | Waseem, Saba | Bradbury, Bruce.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2003Description: 64p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2003Availability: (1)

At risk of homelessness : the roles of income and rent. /

by Ringheim, Karin.

Publisher: New York, NY Praeger 1990Description: 263 p. Bibliography: p. 242-257. Includes index.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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