Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Affluenza : when too much is never enough. /

by Hamilton, Clive | Denniss, Richard.

Publisher: Crows Nest, N.S.W. Allen & Unwin 2005Description: ix, 224 p.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index.Summary: This book is a critique of the western world s addiction to over-consumption. The authors pose the question: if the economy is doing so, why are Australians not becoming happier? They argue that people focus too much on what they lack. Hamilton and Denniss explore the messages of consumerism and marketing, and the effects of debt, overwork, waste and over-spending. In the final section they propose a refreshing alternative political philosophy, based on a commitment to improving well-being rather than mere accumulation of wealth.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Are the low income self-employed poor? /

by Bradbury, Bruce | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 1996Description: 26 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Revised version of a paper presented at the 25th Annual Conference of Economics, ANU, Canberra, 22-26 September 1996. December 1996Availability: (1)

Business as usual : the roots of the global financial meltdown /

by Calhoun, Craig J | Derluguian, Georgi M.

Publisher: New York New York University Press 2011Description: 312 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.Other title: Possible futures series ; v. 1.Notes: A joint publication of the Social Science Research Council and New York University Press. Includes bibliographical references and index Contents: Machine generated contents note: 1.The End of the Long Twentieth Century / Giovanni Arrighi -- 2.Dynamics of (Unresolved) Global Crisis / Immanuel Wallerstein -- 3.The Enigma of Capital and the Crisis This Time / David Harvey -- 4.A Turning Point or Business as Usual? / Daniel Chirot -- 5.Marketization, Social Protection, Emancipation: Toward a Neo-Polanyian Conception of Capitalist Crisis / Nancy Fraser -- 6.Crisis, Underconsumption, and Social Policy / Caglar Keyder -- 7.The Crisis of Global Capitalism: Toward a New Economic Culture? / Manuel Castells -- 8.The Convolution of Capitalism / Gopal Balakrishnan -- 9.The Future in Question: History and Utopia in Latin America (1989-2010) / Fernando CoronilSummary: Situates the current crisis in the historical trajectory of the capitalist world-system, showing how the crisis was made possible not only by neoliberal financial reforms but by a massive turn away from manufacturing things of value towards seeking profit from financial exchange and credit. Much more basic than the result of a few financial traders cheating the system, this is a potential historical turning point. In original essays, the contributors establish why the system was ripe for crisis of the past, and yet why this meltdown was different. The volume concludes by asking whether as deep as the crisis is, it may contain seeds of a new global economy, what role the US will play, and whether China or other countries will rise to global leadership. The Possible Futures Series gathers together the great minds of social science to address the significance of the global economic crisis in a series of short, accessible books. Each volume takes on the past, present and future of this crisis, suggesting that the crisis has an informative history, that the consequences could be much more basic than stock declines, and that only fundamental changes - not fiscal band aids - can hold off future repetitions.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Climate change and sustainable consumption : what do the public think is fair? /

by Horton, Tim | Joseph Rowntree Foundation | Doron, Natan.

Publisher: York, U.K. Joseph Rowntree Foundation 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2011 Bibliography : p. 81-84Summary: This report explores public attitudes to fairness in the context of sustainable consumption and climate change. Evidence from many areas of behaviour suggests that views about fairness can be powerful in driving pro-social behaviours. This research, through a series of focus groups, explored strategies that can tap into people's sense of fairness around sustainable consumption and climate change to see if this could build public support for behaviour change and sustainability policies.Availability: (1)

Consumer confidence and market experience study 2010 - 2011 /

by Consumer Affairs Victoria.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Consumer Affairs Victoria 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This document presents the findings of the third Consumer Confidence and Market Experience Study commissioned by Consumer Affairs Victoria. The study follows on from the 2008 Consumer Confidence and Market Experience Study and 2006 Consumer Detriment Study. The purpose of the Consumer Confidence and Market Experience Study is to determine the level of consumer confidence in the consumer protection framework, and examine the experience of consumers in the market, including incidences of detriment.Availability: (1)

Consumer price index, Australia /

by Australian Bureau of Statistics.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T.Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) catalogue no. 6401.0 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Published quarterly: March ; June ; September ;December 1972-79 ; 1980-89 ; 1990-99 ; 2000-09 ; 2010Summary: "Quarterly publication showing movements in retail prices of goods and services commonly purchased by metropolitan households. The goods and services are divided into the following groups: food; alcohol and tobacco; clothing and footwear; housing; household contents and services; health; transportation; communication; recreation; education; and financial and insurance services. Indexes for each of these groups and for 'All Groups' are published for each of the state capitals along with Canberra and Darwin, and for the weighted average of the eight capital cities. Details are also shown for about 54 sub-groups and special and analytical series, for the weighted average of the eight capital cities." -- ABS website.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Consumer voices : sustaining advocacy and research in Australia's new consumer policy framework : issues paper /

by Australia. The Treasury.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Treasury 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 8 May 2009Summary: This issues paper outlines the Australian Government?s approach to consumer policy, as well as existing Australian Government support for consumer advocacy and consumer policy research. It raises issues in relation to finding sustainable approaches to supporting consumer advocacy and consumer policy-focused research in the medium to long term.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Distribution of the economic gains of the 1990s : staff research paper. /

by Parham, Dean | Australia. Productivity Commission | Barnes, Paula | Roberts, Paul | Kennett, Sharon.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Productivity Commission 2000Description: xxx,163 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: November 2000 Includes bibliographical references (p. 157-163)Availability: (1)

Do house prices impact consumption and interest rate? : evidence from OECD countries using an agnostic identification procedure /

by Andr , Christophe | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development | Gupta, Rangan | Kanda, Patrick T.

Publisher: Paris, France OECD Publishing 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Working paper No.947Summary: This paper investigates the existence of significant spillovers from the housing sector onto the wider economy for the seven major OECD countries using Uhlig's (2005) agnostic identification procedure. This method allows a housing demand shock to be identified in a six-variable VAR model by imposing sign restrictions on the impulse responses of consumer prices, residential investment, real house prices and mortgage loans, while private consumption and nominal interest rate responses are left unrestricted. The results suggest that consumption responds positively and significantly to a house price shock in Canada,France, Japan and the UK. A significant positive delayed response of nominal interest rates follows a house price shock in Germany, Japan, the UK and the US, suggesting that while central banks do not seem to respond instantly and systematically to a housing demand shock, their repercussions on the economy tend to translate into higher policy rates after a few quarters.Availability: (1)

Evidence versus emotion : how do we really make financial decisions? /

by Australia Institute.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia Institute 2010Description: 38 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2010Summary: Around one in three Australians are regularly putting one or more everyday bills like utilities, car registration and groceries on their credit card but not paying the balance off in full each month. Categorised as 'playing catch-up', these people face higher rates of interest on household bills, due to lack of cash flow. The Australia Institute conducted an online survey of 1,180 adult Australians in October 2010. Respondents were sourced from a reputable online panel provider, and quotas were applied to ensure a representative sample of the broader Australian population by gender, age and household income. Respondents were provided with a small incentive (Availability: (1)

Expenditures on children by families, 2010 /

by Lino, Mark | United States. Department of Agriculture. Center for utrition Policy and Promotion.

Publisher: Alexandria, Virginia U.S. Department of Agriculture. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Cost of raising a child report.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011 Miscellaneous publication number 1528-2010 Bibliography : pp. 24-25Summary: Since 1960, the U.S. Department of Agriculture has provided estimates of expenditures on children from birth through age 17. This technical report presents the most recent estimates for husband-wife and single-parent families using data from the 2005-06 Consumer Expenditure Survey, updated to 2010 dollars using the Consumer Price Index. Data and methods used in calculating annual child-rearing expenses are described. Estimates are provided for major components of the budget by age of child, family income, and region of residence. For the overall United States, annual child-rearing expense estimates ranged between Availability: (1)

Happiness and the Human Development Index : Australia is not a paradox /

by Leigh, Andrew | Australian National University. Centre for Economic Policy esearch | Wolfers, Justin.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian National University. Centre for Economic Policy Research 2005Description: PDF.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Household income sharing, joint consumption and the expenditure patterns of Australian retired couples and single couples. /

by Bradbury, Bruce | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Kensington, N.S.W. University of New South Wales 1996Description: 40 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 1996Summary: The main conclusions of the paper are that income is shared relatively evenly (and the hypotheses of equal sharing cannot be rejected), and that on average couples require about one and half times the income of singles to reach the same living standard. This suggests that current Australian pension payments to singles are relatively too low.Availability: (1)

How much did the 2009 fiscal stimulus boost spending? /

by Leigh, Andrew.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian National University 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Forty percent of households who said that they received the payment reported having spent it. ; Forty percent of households who said that they received the payment reported having spent it - approximately twice the spending rate recorded in surveys assessing the 2001 and 2008 tax rebates in the US, according to this report. ; Using an approach for converting spending rates into an aggregate marginal propensity to consume (MPC), this is consistent with an aggregate MPC of 0.41-0.42. Since this estimate is based only on first-quarter spending, it may be an underestimate of the longer-run impact of the package on consumer expenditure.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Income sharing between parents and young people living at home. /

by Schneider, Judy | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Social Policy Research Centre. University of New South Wales 2003Description: 1 v.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2003 Includes bibliographical references.Availability: (1)

Just get over it : the cost of living in Australia /

by Soutphommasane, Tim | Per Capita.

Publisher: Surry Hills, N.S.W. Per Capita 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2011 Bibliography pp. 27-29Summary: This paper investigates the cost of living in Australia, an issue that has dominated recent political debate. It evaluates whether cost of living complaints are justified in light of economic reality and household consumption patterns. It considers how governments should respond to cost of living issues. While much public discourse suggests there is a generalised cost of living crisis, the reality is less alarming. Inflation figures indicate only a modest increase in the cost of living, even when adjusted to include mortgage interest and consumer credit charges. While the cost of some essential items have experienced price rises that exceed the CPI, with particularly negative effects on those on fixed and low incomes, these must be considered in light of the full economic context. Wage growth, low unemployment and higher household savings levels all indicate a disproportionate level of concern about the rising cost of living. Australian households are, on average, better off now than they ever have been.Availability: (1)

Materialism on the march : from conspicuous leisure to conspicuous consumption? /

by Leigh, Andrew | Frijters, Paul.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian National University. Centre for Economic Policy Research 2005Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://econrsss.anu.edu.au/pdf/DP495.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:25:42 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Money doesn't buy happiness ... or does it? : a reconsideration based on the combined effects of wealth, income and consumption /

by Headey, Bruce | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Muffels, Rund | Wooden, Mark.

Publisher: [Parkville, Vic.] Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2004Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2004 Includes bibliographical references and index.Availability: (1)

Overconsumption in Britain : a culture of middle-class complaint? /

by Hamilton, Clive.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Australian Institute 2003Description: PDF.Notes: Library also holds print copySummary: In the United Kingdom, a high proportion of citizens feel that their incomes are inadequate to buy everything they really need. A companion study to Discussion Paper 49, "Overconsumption in Australia : the rise of the middle-class battler" by Clive Hamilton (B11233).Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

People and the planet /

by Royal Society (Great Britain).

Publisher: London, U.K. The Royal Society 2012Description: PDF.Other title: The Royal Society Science Policy Centre report 01/12.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2012 Includes references p. 107Summary: This report gives an overview of how global population and consumption are linked, and the implications for a finite planet.Availability: (1)

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