Brotherhood of St Laurence

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A tale of two Melbournes? The disparities of place and how to bridge the divide / delivered by Professor Roz Hansen

by Hansen, Roz | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. unpub. 2012Description: 7 p. PDF.Other title: Sambell Oration 2012 | Sambell Oration to the Brotherhood of St Laurence .Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: 27 November, 2012 Professor Roz Hansen, Adjunct Professor, Deakin UniversitySummary: And thank you to executive director Tony Nicholson for paying me the honour of asking me to deliver the Sambell Oration. As chair of the Ministerial Advisory Committee helping the State Government map out a new Metropolitan Planning Strategy – a blueprint to guide Melbourne's expansion and growth over the next 40 years – I have got to know Tony as a member of the committee. I can testify he is passionate about bringing to the table the Brotherhood's concern about weaving together economic and social policies to deliver a more inclusive growth for our city.Availability: (1)

Accommodating Australians : Commonwealth Government involvement in housing /

by Troy, Patrick N.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Federation Press 2012Description: xiii, 320 p. : ill.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and indexSummary: The book discusses the way in which Commonwealth initiative led to the States adopting town planning processes that due to State departure from historic approaches to the provision of urban infrastructure services has helped fuel a massive rise in dwelling prices. This book explores the response of the Australian Government during the bleakest years of WWII when it took stock of the situation facing the housing of the people and the way it developed a housing program in the post war period to improve the way they were accommodated. The ambitions of those who witnessed the extremes of housing deprivation during the Depression and resolved to improve the quality of housing, to make it more affordable and the nation fairer are outlined. It is a story about the rise and fall of public housing and helps explain why Australian housing has now become one of the most expensive in the developed world. It is also about the way Commonwealth initiatives built on the reforming agendas of critics within the States of the prevailing mode of and approach to urban development led to the introduction of town planning in Australia. It is also a sad tale about the way principle and mature consideration of the rational way to develop our cities gave way to pre-occupation with accommodating the short term wishes of developers. This history is an important aspect of Commonwealth-State relations over the last 70 years and explores the way interpretations of the Constitution have evolved to result in the Commonwealth gradually assuming greater authority over the States in the development and management of our accommodation (as in other areas). It in, large measure, documents the fragile and limited nature of the idea of the Federation and the few opportunities taken to see things as a nation rather than a loose coalition of States.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Australian Unity wellbeing index : report 12.1. /

by Cummins, Robert A | Davern, Melanie | Okerstrom, Erik.

Publisher: Geelong, Vic. Deakin University. Australian Centre on Quality of Life 2005Description: PDF.Availability: No items available

Australian Unity wellbeing index : report 13.1. /

by Cummins, Robert A | Knapp, T Meika | Woerner, Jacqui.

Publisher: Geelong, Vic.Australian Unity Wellbeing Index 2005Description: PDF.Summary: The Australian Unity Wellbeing Index is a subjective barometer of Australians satisfaction with their lives and life in Australia. It measures how various aspects of life both personal and national affect our sense of wellbeing.Availability: No items available

Australian Unity wellbeing index : report 14.1 : fifth anniversary special report : summarising the major findings. /

by Cummins, Robert A.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Deakin University. Australian Centre on Quality of Life 2006Description: PDF.Summary: The Australian Unity Wellbeing Index is a subjective barometer of Australians satisfaction with their lives and life in Australia. It measures how various aspects of life both personal and national affect our sense of wellbeing.Availability: No items available

Australian Unity wellbeing index : survey 15 : report 15.0 : part A : the report : Part B : appended tables. /

by Cummins, Robert A | Woerner, Jacqui | Tomyn, Adrian.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Deakin University. Australian Centre on Quality of Life 2006Description: PDF.Summary: The Australian Unity Wellbeing Index is a subjective barometer of Australians satisfaction with their lives and life in Australia. It measures how various aspects of life both personal and national affect our sense of wellbeing.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Australian Unity Wellbeing Index : survey 16 : report 16.1: special report. /

by Cummins, Robert A | Walter, Jenny | Woerner, Jacqui.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Deakin University. Australian Centre on Quality of Life 2007Description: PDF.Summary: The Australian Unity Wellbeing Index is a subjective barometer of Australians satisfaction with their lives and life in Australia. It measures how various aspects of life both personal and national affect our sense of wellbeing.Availability: No items available

Beyond the suburbs : population change in the major exurban regions of Australia. /

by McKenzie, Fiona.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Government Publishing Service 1996Description: xiv, 78 p. : ill., maps.Notes: Cat. No. 9605711 "This report was prepared for the Bureau of Immigration, Multicultural and Population Research, whose work has now been absorbed into the Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs"-- inside cover. Includes bibliographical references (p. 73-78)Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

City Futures Research Centre : UNSW Build Environment [Website] / City Futures Research Centre

by University of New South Wales. City Futures Research Centre.

Publisher: Sydney, NSW. UNSW Built Environment 2015Description: Website.Online Access: Website Summary: Their work advances the understanding of Australia’s cities, their people, the policies that manage their growth, and their impacts on our society and economy. Our research informs solutions to major urban of city equity, productivity, sustainability, resilience, governance and renewal. The Centre works in partnership with government, industry and not for profit sectors, and with communities, to address these issues. Since its establishment in 2005, City Futures has provided a training ground for the next generation of urban thinkers, city shapers, and urban scientists. We provide ethical, evidence-based inputs to contemporary urban policy debates and the planning of Australia’s future cities. The Centre is committed to the United Nations New Urban Agenda in creating a shared vision for a better and more sustainable future and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with a strong focus on Goal 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Competitive cities and climate change /

by Kamal-Chaoui, Lamia (ed.) | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. irectorate for Public Governance and Territorial Development | Robert, Alexis (ed.).

Publisher: Paris, France Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development 2010Description: PDF.Other title: OECD Regional Development working paper ; no. 2, 2009.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 131-133Summary: Cities have a key role to play in the global agenda for addressing the challenge of climate change. Today, approximately half of the world?s population lives in cities; by 2050, that proportion will probablyhave increased to two-thirds. Cities are responsible for the bulk of national output, innovation and employment, and they constitute the key gateways of transnational capital flows and global supply chains (OECD, 2006). As key engines of the global economy, cities are responsible for the bulk of national output, innovation and employment, and they constitute the key gateways of transnational capital flows and global supply chains (OECD, 2006). It is therefore not surprising that cities consume a great majority - between 60 to 80% -of energy production worldwide and account for a roughly equal share of global greenhouse emissions. All projections indicate that this trend will continue as urban populations grow. If urbanization is contributing to the increase in CO2 emissions, many cities arealso likely to be affected by climate change in increasingly detrimental ways. The tendency for cities to be located in coastal areas increases their vulnerability to water-related calamities, increasing the risk to property, livelihoods and urban infrastructure.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Future urban development impacts on low income households /

by Mant, John.

Publisher: unpub. 1991Description: 8 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: At head of title : Australian Council of Social ServiceAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Investing in transport : east west link needs assessment /

by Eddington, Rod | Victoria. Department of Infrastructure.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Victoria. Department of Infrastructure 2008Description: HTML.Other title: Investing in transport report.Notes: March 2008 Summary, Main report, Supporting technical documents. Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: From March 2007, Sir Rod Eddington, an Australian engineer and businessman and a leading international transport expert, conducted an independent study into improving east-west transport connections across Melbourne. With at least 4.5 million people expected to call Melbourne home by 2031, there will be more cars making trips on the roads, more people using public transport, more commuters needing to get to work each morning, and more and more goods moving through the city. For Melbourne to remain an attractive, liveable and successful city, it needs a transport system that can keep up with this growth.Availability: No items available

Local governance and the drivers of growth. /

by Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: Paris, France OECD Publishing 2005Description: 278 p. : ill.Online Access: OECD iLibrary (Read only) Notes: Includes bibliographical references. 1. The drivers of growth: why governance matters / by Sylvain Giguere -- 2. The instruments of good governance / by Xavier Greffe -- 3. Partnerships, relationships and networks: understanding local collaboration strategies in different countries / by Mark Considine -- 4. Globalisation, new public services, local democracy: what's the connection? / by Charles F. Sabel -- 5. Local strategies in a global economy: lessons from competitive cities / by Michael Parkinson -- 6. Financing local economic development: experiences in Europe and the United States / by Randall W. Eberts -- 7. The design and implementation of local development strategies: the case of Central and Eastern Europe / by Scott Abrams and Fergus Murphy.Availability: (1)

Melbourne, let's talk about the future /

by Victoria. Department of Planning and Community Development.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Victoria. Department of Planning and Community Development 2012Description: x, 94 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2012Summary: Great cities don't just happen. For more than 150 years Melbourne has benefitted from sound strategic planning and investment in transport, water storages, parks and social services. Melbourne has a history of designing and developing quality spaces and buildings. In 2012, the city now faces new challenges if it is to remain a great place to live, work, visit and do business. In order to meet these challenges, the Victorian Government is preparing a new Metropolitan Planning Strategy for Melbourne. The Strategy will set a vision for Melbourne to the year 2050 and, together with eight regional growth plans that will cover the balance of Victoria, a state-wide blueprint for managing growth and development. This Discussion Paper has been prepared to generate debate and discussion among Melburnians about the future of our city. As a community we need to talk together about the future.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Planning for healthier growth : how can metropolitan strategic planning address social infrastructure gaps in middle and outer suburban Melbourne? : summary report /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2012 This report is based on notes taken voluntarily by Kirsten Alber, Melinda Rendina, Kimberley Bendall, Courtney Daniels, Melanie Davern and Elissa McMillan at the workshop. Bibliography : p. 14Summary: The Planning for Healthier Growth workshop was held on 14 November 2011 at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne (UoM), under the auspices of the university's Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning and the Brotherhood of St Laurence?s Research and Policy Centre, and with the support of the Melbourne Engagement and Partnerships Office. These proceedings are aimed at informing and stimulating public discussion, debate and research and policy initiatives to address one of the central challenges facing contemporary Australian governments, industries and communities.Availability: (1)

Population growth and sustainability /

by Birrell, Bob | Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. arliamentary Library.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services. 2011Description: PDF.Other title: Australia. Department of Parliamentary Services..Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: This paper explores the role of population growth in the prospects for a sustainable economy and society in Australia. It deals separately with ecological and social issues. On the former it concludes that should Australia?s population reach the 'Big Australia' projection of 35.9 million by 2050, this will not put serious pressure on Australia's non-renewable resource stock or capacity to feed the nation. However such population growth will make the task of reducing greenhouse emissions very difficult. On the social dimension, quality of life issues (including congestion, urban redevelopment and competition for amenity) are a major factor in public concerns about sustainability. The evidence suggests that most people think population growth is a major cause of these problems. State government moves to increase urban density in order to cope with additional capital city residents are likely to exacerbate these quality of life concerns.Availability: (1)

Social cities /

by Kelly, Jane-Frances | Grattan Institute.

Publisher: Carlton, Vic. Grattan Institute 2012Description: PDF.Other title: Grattan Institute report ; no. 2012-4.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2012 Bibliography : p. 61-66Summary: Humans are social animals: relationships are critical to our wellbeing. Indeed, a lack of face-to-face contact can put our health at risk. This report looks at ways to make cities better places to live by increasing our opportunities to connect with other people. It examines how the design and functioning of a city - from transport networks to the availability of parks and sporting grounds to the architecture of public spaces and buildings - can help bring people together or keep them apart. It shows that even modest and inexpensive changes, such as installing benches at the edge of a public area or converting an unused lot into a 'pocket park', can make urban spaces more welcoming. Australian cities are expected to keep growing for the foreseeable future. If they are to absorb more residents and improve quality of life for all, then it is essential that cities provide for our social as well as our material needs.Availability: (1)

Social exclusion and the future of cities. /

by Power, Anne | Wilson, William Julius.

Description: 31 leaves.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: URL: 'http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/publications/casepapers.asp' Checked: 2/03/2009 9:39:47 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Submission to the Inquiry into Growth Corridor Plans /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2011Summary: The Brotherhood of St Laurence supports and welcomes the Growth Corridor Plans. We agree with the principles underpinning the Growth Corridor Plans, especially those which are seeking to: create diverse and vibrant new urban communities; integrate transport and land use planning; plan for local employment creation; create growth corridors with high amenity and character; and stage development to ensure the efficient and orderly provision of infrastructure and services. In order to meet the community service needs of children, young people, families and older people in urban growth areas, we argue there needs to be appropriate physical infrastructure within those localities. As a priority, we request the state government to set aside land and a community sector capital fund to support the establishment of locally based infrastructure and integrated youth services.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The impact of immigration in Australia : a demographic approach. /

by Burnley, Ian H.

Publisher: South Melbourne Oxford University Press 2001Description: xvii, 388 p. : ill.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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