Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Baby boomers : doing it for themselves /

by Kelly, Simon | National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling | Harding, Ann.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling (NATSEM). University of Canberra 2007Description: PDF.Other title: AMP.NATSEM income and wealth report ; issue 16.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2007Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Baby boomers and retirement : dreams, fears and anxieties. /

by Hamilton, Myra | The Australia Institute | Hamilton, Clive.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Australia Institute 2006Description: xv, 71 p.Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 63-65) September 2006 Retirement & ageingAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Cultural Chameleons : an investigation into the construction and influences of working-class identities on the formal learning of white, baby-boomer males /

by Lovett, Trevor | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 9-11Summary: This paper outlines the findings of a qualitative, narrative, retrospective investigation into white, working-class, baby-boomer males? perceptions of their own formal educational experiences. The study while accepting the significance of the socio-economic/class correlation also identified important non-material influences of class on the participants? formal learning. The investigation revealed how discursively marginalized social identities negotiated their relationship with formal learning environments. Social persistence or continuity was considered problematic because many effects normally associated with a stratified social structure were not obvious in the research data. The study showed that the participants' educational potential was affected more by the dynamics of personal interaction than broad socially constructed differences. It was found that the educational and social opportunities of the participant sample tended to be a consequence of the respect individual actors showed for each other both within and outside the context of the school.Availability: (1)

Managing the older worker : how to prepare for the new organizational order /

by Cappelli, Peter | Novelli, Bill.

Publisher: Boston, MA Harvard Business Review Press 2010Description: xx, 208 p. : ill.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: Your organisation needs older workers more than ever: They transfer knowledge between generations, transmit your company's values to new hires, make excellent mentors for younger employees, and provide a "just in time" workforce for special projects. Yet more of these workers are reporting to people younger than they are. This presents unfamiliar challenges that--if ignored--can prevent you from attracting, retaining, and engaging older employees. In Managing the Older Worker, Peter Cappelli and William Novelli explain how companies and younger managers can maximize the value provided by older workers. The key? Recognize that boomers' needs differ from younger generations - and adapt your management practices accordingly. For instance: Lead with mission: As employees age, they become more altruistic. Emphasize the positive impact of older workers' efforts on the world around them. Forge social connections: Many older employees keep working to maintain social relationships. Offer tasks that require interaction with others.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Old enough for the scrapheap? : employment issues for the baby boomers. /

by O'Brien, Martin.

Publisher: 1999Description: p. 207-223.Notes: Rec. no. for book: B9659 indexed chapterAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Sidelined! : workforce participation and non-participation among baby boomers in Australia /

by Bowman, Dina | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Kimberley, Helen.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: x, 37 p. : graphs.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF | Summary Notes: Includes " Sidelined! : workforce participation and non-participation among baby boomers in Australia : research summary."Summary: Sidelined! reports on a qualitative study that provides insight into the contours and experience of mature-age workforce participation in Australia. This study highlighted the widespread and damaging nature of involuntary non-participation and under-participation for older people.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Understanding baby boomers' expectations and plans for their retirement : findings from a qualitative study. /

by Quine, Susan | Bernard, Diana | Kendig, Hal.

Publisher: 2006Availability: No items available

Understanding mature-age workforce participation in Australia /

by Kimberley, Helen | Brotherhood of St Laurence | Bowman, Dina.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A.Older workers: research readings edited by Tabatha Griffin and Francesca Beddie, 2011 2011Description: pp. 84-96.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Indexed chapter by Helen Kimberley and Dina Bowman, Research and Policy Centre, Brotherhood of St Laurence INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: Part of a body of work commissioned by the Brotherhood of St Laurence, this paper addresses the factors affecting the mature-age workforce and consequently reflects the particular focus of the agency on strategies to prevent poverty and disadvantage. Using a multi-method approach, the issue of involuntary non-participation or underemployment is highlighted. The paper begins by highlighting the low level of workforce participation among mature-age people (45-64) in Australia, where the focus of concern is the impact on economic growth, in particular the notion of 'the disappearing taxpayer' (a smaller workforce meeting growing costs). The study critiques this approach and reviews the range of issues which contribute to the capacity of individuals to remain in the workforce and takes a life-course perspective on the generational influences that shape the patterns and experience of people's lives.Availability: (2)

Unready, unwilling and ageing : ethnic baby boomers and their parents /

by Ethnic Communities' Council of Victoria.

Publisher: Carlton, Vic. Ethnic Communities' Council of Victoria 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: ECCV Policy discussion paper 2009.Summary: As this Baby Boomer subgroup approaches the traditional age of retirement with the same reluctance to slow down and change their ways as their mainstream peers, little is known about how well they are preparing for the inevitable impacts of their overseas-born parents becoming elderly and frail. In October 2008, the Ethnic Communities' Council of Victoria (ECCV) Aged Care Committee hosted a public seminar on this timely issue. This discussion paper presents the initial findings of that consultation and highlights some of the key issues raised.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

When I m 64 : the public library after the retirement of the baby boomers. /

by Williamson, Kirsty | Bannister, Marion | Makin, Lynne.

Publisher: Wagga Wagga, N.S.W.Research Applications in Information and Library Studies Seminar 53-66 2006Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Workforce participation and non-participation among baby boomers in Australia : a life-course outline and literature review /

by Berrell, Nicole | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2011Description: 30 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2011 This document is a research support document to the qualitative report. It was completed by Nicole Berrell during an internship with the Brotherhood of St Laurence as part of her Bachelor of Social Science at Swinburne University of Technology (SUT), with Dina Bowman and Helen Kimberley as supervisors.Summary: This is one of several papers, sponsored by the Brotherhood of St Laurence, that address factors affecting the mature-age workforce. It is a supporting document to the main qualitative study by Dina Bowman and Helen Kimberley, Sidelined! workforce participation and non-participation among baby boomers in Australia, and the analysis of HILDA data that was undertaken by NATSEM by Cathy Gong and Justine McNamara. The authors of these reports pay particular attention to the situation of older adults not in employment, who nevertheless wish to continue working. Their findings suggest that, while the debate is often couched in terms of a seemingly homogeneous group, the participation and non-participation of 'baby boomers' in the workforce reflects a complex combination of circumstances, with some unexpected differences and associations.Availability: (1)

Workforce participation and non-participation among baby boomers in Australia : a profile from HILDA data

by Gong, Honge (Cathy) | National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling | McNamara, Justine.

Publisher: Bruce, A.C.T. NATSEM 2011Description: 26 p. : ill.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: March 2011 This is the first of several papers, sponsored by the Brotherhood of St Laurence, that address factors affecting the mature age workforce. Summary: This quantitative study of mature age workforce participation and non-participation, commissioned by the Brotherhood of St Laurence and undertaken by Cathy Gong and Justine McNamara at NATSEM, University of Canberra, showed that baby boomers are by no means a homogeneous group. Analysis of data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics (HILDA) Survey showed, for example, that just over one-third of people aged 45-54 who are not in the paid workforce would prefer to be working.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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