Brotherhood of St Laurence

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The efficacy of early childhood interventions /

by Wise, Sarah | da Silva, Lisa | Webster, Elizabeth | Sanson, Ann.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2005Description: x, 114 p.Online Access: Electronic copy | Link to AIFS website Notes: July 2005 Includes bibliographical references (p. 52-53) Contents: 1. Background and purpose of the project -- 2. Terminology and scope of the review -- 3. Classification of interventions -- 4. Adequacy of intervention design and implementation -- 5. Adequacy of evaluation design -- 6. Effects of early childhood interventions -- 7. Cost-benefit analysis: purposes and principles -- 8. Steps in a cost-benefit analysis -- 9. Overview of cost-benefit calculations: present value, rate of return and cost-effectiveness methodologies -- 10. Valuing spillovers and non-market transactions -- 11. Evaluations of cost-benefit studies of early childhood interventions -- 12. Lessons for Australia -- Appendix 1. Early childhood interventions identified via a search of the literature -- Appendix 2. Summary of evaluated early childhood interventions.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (2).
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The impact of child support payments on the labour supply decisions of resident mothers /

by Taylor, Matthew | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Gray, Matthew.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Institute of Family Studies [AIFS]. Research paper.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010 This report uses data from Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) confidentialised unit record file. Bibliography : p. 20 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: This report analyses the effect of receipt of child support payments on the labour supply of resident mothers. This is an important issue, given the role that paid employment plays in increasing the short- and long-term economic wellbeing of separated mothers. There appears to be no Australian research into this issue, and only a handful of international studies. The effect of receipt of child support on resident mothers, labour supply is estimated using data from an important new Australian data source, the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC). LSAC is a nationally representative large-scale longitudinal survey of two cohorts of Australian children born in 1999-2000 and 2003-04. The first two waves of LSAC provide information on the child support payments received by resident mothers with at least one child under the age of 7 years. Given that the data used in this study were collected in 2004 and 2006, the estimates are for the Child Support Scheme that was in place prior to the reforms that arose from the recommendations of the Ministerial Taskforce on Child Support, which were fully implemented in July 2008. Economic theory suggests that receipt of non-labour market income (such as child support or income support payments) will reduce the labour force participation of mothers (both the probability of being employed and, where they are already employed, the number of hours worked). This is termed the 'income effect' and occurs because the mother is able to achieve the same level of consumption for fewer hours worked than they would in the absence of these payments. ; LONGITUDINAL STUDY OF AUSTRALIAN CHILDREN (LSAC)Availability: (1)

Today's child care, tomorrow's children! /

by Ochiltree, Gay | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Edgar, Don.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 1995Description: 81 p.Notes: missing 2003Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Training carers : perspectives of professionals from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, non-government agencies and government departments. /

by Richardson, Nick | Bromfield, Leah M | Higgins, Jenny R.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2007Description: 8 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cover title. Includes bibliographical references (p. 6)Summary: Carers need effective, culturally-relevant training that will equip them with the knowledge, skills and confidence to meet the needs of the children who come into their care. Current training programs often fail to meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers and non-Indigenous carers of Indigenous children.Availability: (1)

Unemployment and the wellbeing of children aged 5 to 10 years /

by Taylor, Matthew | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Edwards, Ben | Gray, Matthew.

Publisher: Paddington, N.S.W. The Benevolent Society 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2010 Bibliography : p. 24Summary: Unemployment typically has adverse financial consequences and can have negative social and health impacts. The negative effects of unemployment may flow on to affect children, either because of the negative financial impact or because of the impacts on parenting and parental mental health. However the likely impact of increases in the unemployment rate on children's wellbeing and the extent to which there are differences in these effects between geographic areas are not well understood. This report begins to fill this gap by estimating the potential impact of an increase in the unemployment rate on children's behavioural and emotional outcomes in New South Wales (NSW). It also examines the extent to which the negative impacts are concentrated within particular geographic areas. In this report we focus on family joblessness rather than unemployment in the household as it is a more useful measure for families with dependent children.Availability: (1)

Valuing young lives : evaluation of the National Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy. /

by Mitchell, Penny.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2000Description: xiv, 194 p. : ill.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and index.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people in care : perspectives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people. /

by Higgins, Jenny R | Higgins, Daryl J | Bromfield, Leah M.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cover title. Includes bibliographical references (p. 7)Summary: In this paper, international and Australian research on children?s wellbeing and the views of young people in care are reviewed, followed by a review of the literature regarding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people in care. We then discuss the findings from children and young people who participated in this study.Availability: (1)

What is community disadvantage?Understanding the issues, overcoming the problem /

by Price-Robertson, Rhys | Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011 Bibliography : p. 10Summary: This Resource Sheet briefly summarises a number of influential recent approaches to conceptualising and measuring disadvantage. It aims to provide practitioners, service providers and policy-makers with a background on some of the key theoretical and practical tools that currently exist to better understand, and more effectively address, the difficulties faced by many children and families living in disadvantaged Australian communities.Availability: (1)

What role can child and family services play in enhancing opportunities for parents and families? : exploring the concepts of social exclusion and social inclusion /

by McDonald, Myfanwy | Australian Institute of Family Studies.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2011 Bibliography : p. 13-15Summary: Draws upon research to provide practitioners and policy-makers with ideas about how the concept of social inclusion can be used to plan and deliver child and family services in ways that enhance opportunities for parents and families.Availability: (1)

What works to overcome indigenous disadvantage : key learnings gaps in the evidence /

by Al-Yaman, Fadwa | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Higgins, Daryl.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 50 appendices : p. 38-49Summary: This paper provides policy makers with key findings about what works and assesses the gaps in the evidence.Availability: (1)

Why is there a shortage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers? : perspectives of professionals from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, non-government agencies and government departments. /

by Bromfield, Leah M | Higgins, Jenny R | Higgins, Daryl J | Richardson, Nick.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cover title. Includes bibliographical references (p. 7)Summary: There is enormous pressure on the Australian out-of-home care system to meet the demand for suitable placements. At 30 June 2006 there were 27,188 children and young people living within formal out-of-home care placements in Australia. This is almost double the number of children who were living in out-of-home care just ten years ago However there are no national data available on the reasons why children are placed in out-of-home care.Availability: (1)

Why standard assessment processes are culturally inappropriate : perspectives of professionals from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, non-government agencies and government departments. /

by Bromfield, Leah M | Higgins, Jenny R | Higgins, Daryl J.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2007Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Cover title. Includes bibliographical references (p. 8)Summary: Standard assessment processes have a dual purpose. They are designed to determine a carer?s capacity to provide care within a framework of mainstream (Anglo-European) culture, parenting values and family life, as well as middle-class living standards. They are also designed to screen out undesirable carers such as those who are likely to abuse children or expose them to adverse situations (e.g., violence or crime). However, when attempting to assess carers within in an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander context, standard assessment procedures are unsuitable as they fail to elicit relevant information, and overlook the cultural needs of Indigenous children in care.Availability: (1)

Working with families concerned with school-based bullying /

by Lodge, Jodie | Australian Institute of Family Studies. Australian Family elationships Clearinghouse.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2008Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Family Relationships Clearinghouse. Briefing ; no..Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Working with Indigenous children, families, and communities : lessons from practice /

by Price-Robertson, Rhys | Australian Institute of Family Studies | McDonald, Myfanwy.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: March 2011 Bibliography : p. 7 This report was produced in partnership with Peter Lewis & Muriel Bamblett of the Victorian Aboriginal Child Care AgencySummary: Planning and delivering services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, families, and communities can be a complex task for practitioners and policy-makers. Social problems are often deeply entrenched, and need to be approached with consideration of historical, social, community, family and individual factors. Furthermore, as Australian Indigenous cultures are not homogenous, Indigenous communities can differ considerably. Indigenous communities often have characteristics specific to geographic location, with significant variation evident across urban, rural, and remote communities.Availability: (1)

Young people and their parents : supporting families through changes that occur in adolescence. /

by Robinson, Elly | Australian Institute of Family Studies. Australian Family elationships Clearinghouse.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Institute of Family Studies. Australian Family Relationships Clearinghouse 2006Description: PDF.Other title: Australian Family Relationships Clearinghouse. Briefing ; no..Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Youth Suicide Prevention Communications Project. /

by Australian Institute of Family Studies. Youth Suicide Prevention.

Publisher: 23/05/2006 10:12:20http://www.aifs.gov.au/ysp/ 2006Notes: Description based on contents viewed : 23 May 2006 Mode of access : WORLD WIDE WEB ONLINE RESOURCESummary: As part of Australia's National Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy (1995-1999), the Australian Institute of Family Studies was engaged by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care to address the information and communication needs of those involved in youth suicide prevention via the Communications Project and ro evaluate the Strategy. > The Communications Project has now been completed. This web site has been reviewed and revised, and except for the Links page, will no longer be updated.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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