Brotherhood of St Laurence

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An outline of National Standards for Out-of-Home Care : a priority project under the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children : 2009-2020 /

by Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2010Summary: The National Standards for Out-of-Home Care have been designed to deliver consistency and drive improvements in the quality of care provided to children and young people. The 13 National Standards focus on the key factors that directly influence better outcomes for those living in out-of-home care. The measurement of and reporting on, outcomes is a major feature of the refining and improving of the National Standards over the long term. Evidence shows that the experiences and quality of care received in out-of-home care can be critical to determining whether a child or young person can recover from the effects of trauma and more able to access opportunities in life.Availability: (1)

Approaches to personal money management : a population segmentation based on data from the ANZ Survey of Adult Financial Literacy in Australia (2008) /

by Social Research Centre and Data Analysis Australia | Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2011Description: x, 57 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.Other title: Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 57Summary: This report presents findings from a segmentation analysis that used data from the 2008 ANZ Survey of Adult Financial Literacy in Australia. The project profiles the population into segments based on personal money management attitudes and behaviours. The findings are designed to help policy makers better understand how money is managed in Australia, to inform the development of new approaches to assist people in financial difficulty and to prevent people getting into such situations in the first place.Availability: (1)

Background paper to Time for action : the National Council's plan for Australia to reduce violence against women and their children, 2009-2021. /

by Australia. National Council to Reduce Violence Against Women and.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2009Description: 200 p. ; 30 cm.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Companion volume to: Time for action : the National Council's plan for Australia to reduce violence against women and their children, 2009-2021 - 362.82920994 AUS The cost of violence against women and their children 362.82920994 AUS Family & early yearsAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Costs and pathways of homelessness : developing policy-relevant economic analyses for the Australian homelessness service system. /

by Pinkney, Sarah | Ewing, Scott | Swinburne University of Technology. Institute for Social Research.

Publisher: Institute for Social Research, Swinburne University of Technology 2006Description: xvi, 380 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography: p. 359-380 Family & early years Into & out of work School to work Retirement & ageingAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Effectiveness of individual funding approaches for disability support /

by Fisher, Karen R | Social Policy and Research Centre, University of New South ales.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services & Indigenous Affairs 2010Description: iii, 113 p.Other title: Occasional Paper (Australia. Department of Families,.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 111 - 113Summary: This report examines the effectiveness of individual funding of disability support and aimed to inform policy to improve the provision of disability support. Individual funding is defined in this report as a portable package of funds allocated for a particular person that facilitates control over how they purchase their disability support needs. The way individual funding is organised varies in relation to who holds the funds, which parts of it are portable and what disability support types it can be spent on from which parts of the market. Individual funding is more likely to be used by people of working age with low support needs, by male and non-Indigenous service users, by people with one disability and by people without informal care networks.Availability: (1)

Evaluation of income management in the Northern Territory /

by Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Department 2010Description: viii., 87 p.: ill., graphs.Other title: Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 87Summary: This paper is an evaluation of the income management program introduced as part of the Northern Territory Emergency Response that was announced in June 2007. The report is structured around key evaluation questions exploring how well the income management program was implemented and administered, and whether it was achieving its objectives. The evaluation used quantitative data from a client survey and qualitative data from focus groups of key stakeholders, as well as telephone surveys of community store operators, a survey of Government Business Managers and a qualitative report on community consultations.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Footprints in Time - The Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC)' [Website]

by Australia. Department of Social Services.

Online Access: Website | DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: Footprints in Time Key Summary Report from Wave 1 ; Wave 2 ; Wave 3 ; Wave 4 ; Wave 5Summary: Footprints in Time is the name given to the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC), an initiative of the Australian Government. Footprints in Time is conducted by the Department of Social Services (DSS) under the guidance of the Footprints in Time Steering Committee, chaired by Professor Mick Dodson AM. LSIC is one of a suite of longitudinal studies within the National Centre for Longitudinal Data (NCLD) in DSS. The study includes two groups of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander children who were aged 6 to 18 months (B cohort) and 3½ - 5 years (K cohort) when the study began in 2008. In wave 1, over 1,680 interviews were conducted with the children’s parents or primary carers (usually the mothers) and over 265 interviews were conducted with fathers or other significant carers. Subsequent waves experienced strong support from these initial interviewees. To date, Footprints in Time interviewers have successfully contacted and interviewed over 1,200 of these original families in each subsequent wave. Additional families were introduced within our wave 2 interviews and have shown a similarly strong commitment to Footprints in Time. Interviews are primarily conducted by Department of Social Services Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Research Administration Officers (RAOs). Interviews may also be conducted by other National Office Indigenous and non-Indigenous staff when required. Availability: (2)

Housing costs and living standards among the elderly /

by Bradbury, Bruce | Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community services and Indigenous Affairs | Gubhaju, Bina.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. The Department 2010Description: viii., 71 p.: ill., graphs.Other title: Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 71Summary: This paper examines how the living standards of older Australians compare with those of the overall population, how much variation in living standards there is across the elderly population and how their living standards have changed over time. Home ownership, as an important aspect of the retirement support package in Australia, is also taken into consideration. The paper uses data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Household Expenditure Surveys from 1988-89 to 2003-04 and the ABS Surveys of Income and Housing from 2003-04 to 2007-08Availability: (1)

Inclusion for people with disability through sustainable supported employment : discussion paper /

by Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 36 FAHCSIA11017.1007 INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: The discussion paper outlines a number of challenges facing the supported employment system today and focuses on six key outcome areas as pathways for reform.Availability: (1)

Income support customers : a statistical overview /

by Australia. Department of Social Services.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2010Description: pp.: ill., graphs, tables.Other title: Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: All issues are available on the Department's website: 2011 ; 2010 ; 2009 ; 2008 ; 2007 ; 2006 ; 2005 ; 2004 ; 2003 ; 2002Summary: The FaHCSIA Statistical Paper series is produced by the department's Research and Analysis Branch. This series is designed to meet the needs to policy makers and researchers by providing authoritative and reliable data on customer numbers.Availability: (1)

Indigenous home ownership issues paper /

by Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Greenway A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2010Summary: This paper canvasses the issues affecting home ownership amongst Indigenous Australians across Australia, including those factors particular to Indigenous land ownership. It also outlines existing supports and services in place to assist with home ownership and raises questions to stimulate discussion on this important issue. While the aspirations of Indigenous people across Australia will differ, and home ownership may not be possible for everyone, the Australian Government?s aim is to facilitate opportunities for people to exercise choice over their housing circumstances.Availability: (1)

National Housing Supply Council 2nd State of supply report 2010 /

by Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community ervices and Indigenous Affairs. National Housing Supply Council.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T Department of Families, Housing, Community Services & Indigenous Affairs 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: April 2010Summary: While housing affordability for first home buyers and private renters declined over the decade to 2008, the global financial crisis and lowering of interest rates have subsequently meant short-term improvements in affordability for mortgagees. In 2007-08, there were over 300,000 lower income home buyers paying more than 30 per cent of their gross income in mortgage repayments (a common definition of 'housing stress'). Around 160,000 of these households were paying more than half of their income in repayments. Many of these mortgagees would have experienced a lowering of repayments during and after the global financial crisis because of lower interest rates. Renters, however, have not benefited directly from the lowering of interest rates. In 2007-08, some 445,000 lower income households renting privately were in 'housing stress'; around 170,000 paid more than half their gross household income in rent. These affordability outcomes are the direct result of the ways in which housing supply shortages play out in the market. In 2007-08, there were 814,000 lower income private renters for whom the rents charged for some or all of 1.4 million private rental dwellings were nominally affordable. However, over three-quarters of these rental dwellings were in fact occupied by households in higher income groups, leaving a shortfall of almost 500,000 dwellings that were both affordable and available for those in the bottom 40 per cent of the income distribution. The strong demand for housing resulting from population growth, coupled with falls in residential construction in many submarkets, is also likely to lead to tighter rental markets across the country.Availability: (1)

National Housing Supply Council State of supply report 2008 /

by Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community ervices and Indigenous Affairs. National Housing Supply Council.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T Department of Families, Housing, Community Services & Indigenous Affairs 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The National Housing Supply Council's first State of Supply Report focuses on: projections of underlying demand and of land and housing supply over 20 years from 2008 to 2028 the gap between housing demand and supply and implications for submarkets, with particular attention on affordability issues for lower income households a number of current influences on supply and demand, as well as the need for research to better understand how these impact on the housing market discussion of data collection and methodology, including the need for more sophisticated modelling, and the need to improve data collection and analysis, particularly on land supply for residential development. The Council's information gathering and consultation with the housing industry and State, Territory and local governments took place from mid-2008. This was a period of fundamental change in the economic environment, from a period of high interest rates and sustained high levels of economic growth to the sudden and major disruption of the global financial crisis. The Council has endeavoured to factor some of the possible effects of the global financial crisis into our projections of housing demand and supply.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

National plan to reduce violence against women and their children : including the first three-year Action Plan /

by Council of Australian Governments.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography p. 55-58Summary: Reducing all violence in our community is a priority. All forms of violence against women are unacceptable, in any community and in any culture. It is everyone's responsibility to reject and prevent violence. The National Plan targets two main types of violence: domestic and family violence and sexual assault. These crimes are gendered crimes that is they have an unequal impact on women. Whilst there are many forms of violent behaviour perpetrated against women, domestic violence and sexual assault are the most pervasive forms of violence experienced by women in Australia, and require an immediate and focused response.Availability: (1)

Parental divorce and adult family, social and psychological outcomes : the contribution of childhood family adversity /

by Rodgers, Bryan | Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs | Gray, Patricia | Davidson, Tanya | Butterworth, Peter.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2011Description: vi, 47 p. : ill.Other title: Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 43-47Summary: This paper uses data from the Personality and Total Health (PATH) Through Life Project to examine differences in outcomes for children from divorced compared with intact families of origin. The data cover a broad range of adult outcomes relating to family, social and psychological factors and responses to 17 items on childhood family adversity factors experiencedAvailability: (1)

Parental marital status and children's wellbeing /

by Qu, Lixia | Australian Institute of Family Studies | Weston, Ruth.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 80-81 Occasional paper ; no. 46Summary: This paper compares the wellbeing of children whose biological parents are married and those whose parents are cohabiting; it also looks at children in sole-mother families. The researchers from the Australian Institute of Family Studies used data from Waves 1 to 3 of Growing Up in Australia: the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC), a large-scale, nationally representative study of children and families.Availability: (1)

Pension review : background paper. /

by Harmer, Jeff | Australia. Department of Families, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2008Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.facs.gov.au/seniors/pension_review/pension_review_paper.pdf' Checked: 2/03/2009 9:56:34 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success response Retirement & ageingAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Pension Review report . /

by Harmer, Jeff.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Policy outlines for new model of income management : a consulation document /

by Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. unpub. 2010Description: HTLM.Summary: This consulation document outlines five new policy outlines for the income management scheme. The five are: Vulnerable Welfare Payment Recipient Measure; Parental Exemptions - Indicators of financial vulnerability; Parental Exemptions - Parents with children of compulsory school age and under compulsory school age; Class Exemption - Special Benefit; and Matched Savings Scheme (Income Management) Payment.Availability: No items available

Protecting children is everyone's business : National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children : implementing the first three-year action plan, 2009-2012 /

by Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Based on the premise that protecting children is everyone!s business, the National Framework was developed through a strong partnership between governments and the non-government sector and extensive consultation. It is critical that we continue to work together in this way to implement and deliver the National Framework.Availability: (1)

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