Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Alcohol and work : patterns of use, workplace culture and safety. /

by Pidd, Ken | Berry, Jesia G | Harrison, James E | Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2006Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.nceta.flinders.edu.au/workplace/documents/injcat82.pdf' Checked: 22/04/2009 2:28:17 PM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Alcoholics Anonymous : the story of how many thousands of men and women have recovered from alcoholism /

by Alcoholics Anonymous.

Edition: 4th. ed.Publisher: New York, NY Alcoholics Anonymous World Services Inc. 2001Description: xxxii, 575 p.Notes: Fourth edition 2001 by General Services Board of Alcoholics Anonymous Australia with permission Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Alcoholics anonymous : the story of how many thousands of men and women have recovered from alcoholism. /

by Alcoholics Anonymous.

Publisher: New York, NY Alcoholics Anonymous World Services Inc. 1976Description: xxx, 575 p.Online Access: Alcoholics Anonymous Australia website *Reference to Brotherhood of St Laurence & AA Notes: c1993 by General Services Board of Alcoholics Anonymous Australia with permission Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Avoid the harm : stay calm : report on the inquiry into the impact of violence on young Australians /

by Australia. Parliament. House of Representatives. Standing ommittee on Family,Community, Housing and Youth.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2010Description: xvi, 180 p.: ill.Other title: Avoid the harm : stay calm.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: While acknowledging that the survey is not statistically rigorous in terms of population sampling, on the basis of responses received it would appear that youth violence is an issue that concerns most young people. The majority of respondents have witnessed violence and believe that both the incidence and severity of physical violence is increasing. They mainly believe that it occurs between males, although a sizable proportion perceived that females were potentially involved, primarily as victims. Youth violence appears to be occurring across Australia in capital cities, regional centres and through to remote locations. Much of the violence is street or pub/club violence although school or workplace violence is also common. The respondents believe that alcohol and drugs and lack of respect for other people are the main reasons for violence. They believe that education programs are a way to minimise violent behaviour, but support for more police and harsher penalties for perpetrators also featured strongly. Limiting access to alcohol was also raised, but more in the context of the responsible serving of alcohol rather than increasing the legal age of drinking.Availability: (1)

Do you know anyone living in a "lost week-end"? /

Description: 7p.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Availability: Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

Report on socially isolated people in Fitzroy. /

by O'Brien, Terry.

Publisher: Fitzroy, vic Depaul Community Health Centre and Fitzroy Council, Social Planning Office 1977Description: 42p.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Responding to challenges of misuse of alcohol and other drugs by young people of refugee backgrounds : reflections from two projects /

by Foundation House.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Foundation House 2013Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 2013 "The preparation for this report was primarily undertaken by Fritha Melville" Includes bibliographic references pp. 15-17Summary: In 2010 two projects were independently initiated in Western Melbourne, in response to concerns raised by community and local services that mainstream services encountered difficulties engaging young people from refugee backgrounds, especially those considered marginalised and 'at risk'. The projects were the Brimbank Young Men's Project established by the Centre for Multicultural Youth and Engaging Youth: Promoting the Wellbeing of Vulnerable Karen Young Men established by the Victorian Foundation for Survivors of Torture. This report shares reflections from the projects and drawing on the experience of the host organisations and the literature, offers recommendations for the consideration of policy makers, service providers and staff to enable them to engage and work more effectively with young people of refugee backgrounds who may be particularly vulnerable to alcohol and drug misuse.Availability: (1)

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