Brotherhood of St Laurence

Your search returned 54 results.

Not what you expected? Check for suggestions
2008 Immigration detention report : summary of observations following visits to Australia's immigration detention facilities /

by Australian Human Rights Commission.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Australian Human Rights Commission 2008Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

2009 immigration detention and offshore processing on Christmas Island /

by Australian Human Rights Commission.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Australian Human Rights Commission 2009Description: 53 p.: ill. col.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: This report contains a summary of observations by the Australian Human Rights Commission (the Commission) following its July 2009 visit to Australia?s immigration detention facilities on Christmas Island. It follows the Commission?s 2006, 2007 and 2008 annual reports on inspections of immigration detention facilities.Availability: (1)

2011 Immigration detention at Villawood : summary of observations from visit to immigration detention facilities at Villawood /

by Australian Human Rights Commission.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Australian Human Rights Commission 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: The Australian Human Rights Commission visited the immigration detention facilities at Villawood from 21 to 25 February 2011. This statement contains a summary of the key observations and concerns arising from the Commission?s visit. It focuses on conditions as they were at that time.Availability: (1)

A comparative study of housing needs and provisions for recently arrived refugees . /

by Beer, Andrew | Foley, Paul.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2003Description: HTML.Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKAvailability: No items available

Accommodating Australians : Commonwealth Government involvement in housing /

by Troy, Patrick N.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Federation Press 2012Description: xiii, 320 p. : ill.Notes: Includes bibliographical references and indexSummary: The book discusses the way in which Commonwealth initiative led to the States adopting town planning processes that due to State departure from historic approaches to the provision of urban infrastructure services has helped fuel a massive rise in dwelling prices. This book explores the response of the Australian Government during the bleakest years of WWII when it took stock of the situation facing the housing of the people and the way it developed a housing program in the post war period to improve the way they were accommodated. The ambitions of those who witnessed the extremes of housing deprivation during the Depression and resolved to improve the quality of housing, to make it more affordable and the nation fairer are outlined. It is a story about the rise and fall of public housing and helps explain why Australian housing has now become one of the most expensive in the developed world. It is also about the way Commonwealth initiatives built on the reforming agendas of critics within the States of the prevailing mode of and approach to urban development led to the introduction of town planning in Australia. It is also a sad tale about the way principle and mature consideration of the rational way to develop our cities gave way to pre-occupation with accommodating the short term wishes of developers. This history is an important aspect of Commonwealth-State relations over the last 70 years and explores the way interpretations of the Constitution have evolved to result in the Commonwealth gradually assuming greater authority over the States in the development and management of our accommodation (as in other areas). It in, large measure, documents the fragile and limited nature of the idea of the Federation and the few opportunities taken to see things as a nation rather than a loose coalition of States.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Accommodation choices for older Australians : what older Australians and their families need to know /

by Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs 2009Description: vi, 127 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm.Notes: "Information in this booklet is current at 1 June 2009" - verso Includes indexSummary: This book is written for people who are thinking about where they will be living as they get older and for their families. Some people may be thinking about moving for lifestyle reasons. Often, once the family has left home, people think about moving to somewhere smaller and easier to maintain. Once work commitments have lessened or ceased, people may think about the attractions of living in a retirement village with its opportunities for companionship and leisure. Other people are keen to remain in their own homes but might want some more support and help with everyday tasks and perhaps some changes to make living in the house easier to manage. For some older people there will be a move to a residential aged care home which can best meet their needs for care and support. All these situations are covered in this book, as well as the financial aspects. Many people worry about how they will pay for the care and accommodation they need in later life and how any changes in living arrangements may affect their pensions. This book helps you to understand the financial side of your accommodation arrangements and the protection that is in place to help people on a low income to gain access to the care they needAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Active Linking Initiative (ALI) Evaluation /

by Edwards, Robyn | University of New South Wales. Social Policy Research Centre | Fisher, Karen R.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. University of New South Wales, Social Policy Research Centre 2010Description: PDF.Other title: University of New South Wales, Social Policy Research Centre.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: February 2010 Report prepared for Ageing Disability and Home Care, Department of Human Services NSW. Bibliography : p. 58-59Summary: The NSW Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care (DADHC) commissioned the Social Policy Research Centre (SPRC) to evaluate the Active Linking Initiative (ALI). The ALI began in 2000 as one part of the NSW Boarding House Reform Program. ALI aims to link people who live in Licensed Residential Centres (LRC, commonly known as licensed boarding houses) into the community in ways which are meaningful and sustainable. ALI support is a contracted service funded by DADHC and provided by nongovernment organisations (NGO). It aims to facilitate community based activities based on a person's goals, building individual skills to enhance their independence and integration within the community.Availability: (1)

Aged care policy blueprint 2020 /

by Catholic Health Australia.

Publisher: Deakin, A.C.T. Catholic Health Australia 2008Description: PDF.Summary: The last major reform of residential aged care policy occurred in 1997. The benefit of those reforms has now been exhausted. The first major reforms of aged care policy occurred under the Hawke Keating Government. CHA considers that it is time for the next major reforms to be implemented and that it would be appropriate for these to occur under a Rudd Government. ; This policy blueprint is the outcome of a consultation with members of Catholic Health Australia (CHA). One in nine residential aged care beds in Australia is provided through services operated by different bodies of the Catholic Church. CHA, as the peak body for these residential and home care services, speaks on behalf of the largest grouping of aged care services in the Australia. ; CHA adopted in July of 2008 a new vision for aged care which it seeks to see achieved by 2020. This vision is of equity of access to aged care services for all Australians, with a preference for those living in socioeconomic disadvantage.Availability: No items available

Ageing in place : what can we learn from each other? : the sixth F. Oswald Barnett Oration. /

by Tinker, Anthea.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. 1999Description: 28 p.Other title: Oswald Barnett Oration | F. Oswald Barnett Oration ; no.6.Notes: Oration held at St Johns Southgate, Thursday, 9 September 1999.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Ageing in what place? Stage one - case studies /

by Westmore, T | Hanover Welfare Services | Mallett, S.

Publisher: South Melbourne, Vic. Hanover 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: These case studies form part of the final report on Stage One of Hanover Welfare Service's research into the experience of housing crisis and homelessness for older Victorians. This document presents the case studies of fourteen older people interviewed as part of the research. The case studies share incredible stories of hardship and resilience as well as vulnerability and courage. The case studies detail the participant's journeys into housing crisis or homelessness, and provide rich insight into the challenges faced by older Victorians.Availability: (1)

Ageing in what place? The experience of housing crisis and homelessness for older Victorians - Final report /

by Hanover Welfare Services.

Publisher: South Melbourne, Vic. Hanover 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography pp. 41-43 Appendices pp. 44-47Summary: Australia is facing significant demographic shifts over the next decade as the population grows and ages. Currently, services for the ageing population are fragmented with no single government department assuming responsibility for older Australians in all their diversity. ; Homelessness and housing services are reporting an increase in aged people presenting for assistance with no (recent) history of homelessness. Older Australians in private rental, or those entering private rental for the first time, appear to be particularly vulnerable. While the population is diverse, these people all have insecure tenure and limited income. ; In Australia there is no coherent response for older people in housing crisis or at risk of homelessness. In Victoria, the service response for the aged is focused on individuals with chronic health issues and homeless histories. Currently, the homelessness service sector doesn't provide a clearly differentiated response to those at risk of housing crisis or homelessness who are ageing.Availability: (1)

An interim evaluation of the Miller Live N Learn campus . /

by Randolph, Bill | Wood, Helen.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Commonwealth-State Housing Agreement National Data Reports 2003-04 : crisis accommodation program /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)

Community land trusts : what are they? /

by Johnston, Craig | Shelter N.S.W.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Shelter N.S.W. 2009Description: PDF.Other title: Shelter Brief ; no. 39.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2009 Bibliography : p. 21-26Summary: Community land trusts is a type of nonprofit organization that that acquires, owns and stewards land so that it is used for welfare purposes, such as affordable housing and related community facilities and amenities, and so that the cost of the land is effectively taken out of the cost of using that housing and community services by consumers. The organization takes the land out of the market economy and into the social economy, by not participating in normal profit driven processes of land ownership and development It undertakes development of affordable housing and related community facilities and amenities on that land, or it leases the land to other nonprofit organizations to develop affordable housing or related community facilities and amenities on the land. In the latter case, the lease conditions provide for a peppercorn rent, but provide for the dwellings to remain 'perpetually affordable' through conditions on resale - in the case of affordable owner-occupied housing - and conditionson tenancy allocation and rent-setting - in the case of affordable rental housingAvailability: (1)

Crisis Accommodation Program 2006 07 : Commonwealth State Housing Agreement national data report. /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2008Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/hou/cap06-07/cap06-07.pdf' Checked: 6/10/2008 10:49:50 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Crisis Accommodation Program 2008-09 /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2010Description: RTF.Summary: This report presents data for the 2008?09 Commonwealth State Housing Agreement (CSHA) Crisis Accommodation Program (CAP) data collection. This is the last of the reports for this program: as the CSHA finished at 31 December 2008, the program is now funded under the National Affordable Housing Agreement (NAHA).Availability: No items available

Decent not dodgy : 'secretshopper' survey /

by Victorian Council of Social Service.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Victorian Council of Social Service 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 12Summary: To find out more about the quality of rental properties in Victoria, VCOSS surveyed 116 properties on the rental market across metropolitan Melbourne and Geelong. While the majority of these properties met basic standards proposed by VCOSS, 12 per cent were uninhabitable, featuring two or more of the following: extensive mould, no heating, lack of electrical safety switch, and gaps in the walls and roof. Overall, 10 per cent of properties surveyed lacked heating, 19 per cent had visible and extensive mould, 10 per cent had holes in the ceiling, walls or floor, and 33 per cent did not have an electrical safety switch.Availability: (1)

Demand for government-funded specialist homelessness accommodation 2008-09 : a report from the SAAP National Data Collection. /

by Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2010 Cat. no. HOU 230 This report was written by staff of the SAAP National Data Collection Agency at the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW). The Information Services and Publishing Unit of the AIHW helped in preparing the report for publication.Summary: This report presents an overview of the expressed demand for government-funded specialist homelessness accommodation in 2008?09. It is accompanied by a summary publication Demand for government-funded specialist homelessness accommodation 2008-09: summary. Data presented in this report and its summary exclude Victorian data. In Victoria, accommodation for homeless people is also provided through the Transitional Housing Management program. As accommodation provided through transitional housing is not recorded in this report it is therefore not possible to derive turn-away rates for Victoria that are comparable with information reported in previous years, or with those reported by other states and territories. For more information on the reporting of accommodation data in Victoria in 2008?09, refer to Government-funded specialist homelessness services 2008-09 The AIHW and the Victorian Government are working to improve data recording for future reporting.Availability: (1)

Excluded families. Leonard J. Thierney

by Tierney, Leonard James.

Publisher: [New York City, New York, U.S.] [unpublished] 1976Description: 184 leaves PDF; CD [5 files].Online Access: Electronic copy | Dr Leonard James Tierney O.A.M. [bio] Notes: Thesis completed at Columbia University, USA 1976; Thesis is attached as a PDF to this record but is also available on CD in the BSL Archives in five parts. Incomplete print version of Leonard Tierney's thesis. Missing chapters relate to methodology. CD contains five PDF files which make up the thesis: File 01 : Introduction File 02 : The material world of excluded families File 03 : The family life of excluded families File 04: The process of exclusion File 05: Conclusions "Extracts from a Doctoral Thesis School of Social Work, Columbia University" - CD coverSummary: Tierney, Leonard James, 'Excluded Families', Leonard Tierney's doctoral thesis was about following up with a group of families who had lived in emergency housing at Camp Pell during the post-war period. Tierney described them as 'excluded families' due to these families' difficulties with housing, employment and other social services. Tierney observed that a high proportion of members of the families involved in his research study had been involved with the Social Welfare Department - the family's unstable housing situation often resulting in children being admitted into 'care'.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Forced exit: a profile of the young and homeless in inner urban Melbourne. /

by Hirst, Claudia.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Salvation Army [1989]Description: 216 p. Bibliography: p. 212-216.Notes: Published as a result of the Youth Homelessness Policy Development Project, part of the Salvation Army's Crossroads Youth ProjectAvailability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Hosted by Prosentient