Brotherhood of St Laurence

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'For all our children' : report of the independent inquiry into the provision of universal access to high quality preschool education /

by Walker, Kathy | Australian Education Union.

Publisher: Southbank, Vic. Australian Education Union 2004Description: 74 p. : ill.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : p. 65 Includes appendicesSummary: As a relatively wealthy country, Australia is one of the four lowest spending of 36 countries on preschool education for children aged three years and over. The Commonwealth government provides assistance to all other sectors of education, but since 1985 has provided no support to preschools. This national under-resourcing of preschool education underpins many of the barriers that currently prevent universal access to high quality preschool education. Within it, different systems are providing different levels of commitment to preschool education, leading to inequities in the cost to parents and the level of support and resources provided to services. The AEU initiated this independent inquiry because of our concern about the children who continue to miss out on such access. The inquiry is underpinned by a commitment to equity and the belief that all children in Australia should have access to a high quality free public preschool education.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

"Doing it differently" : Report 1: a collaborative project of Anglicare Victoria, the Brotherhood of St Laurence and the Centre for Adolescent Health Royal Children's Hospital. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2005Description: 10p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Progress report for the Frank and Flora Leith Trust. Progress report no. 1Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

"Doing it differently" : Report 2: a collaborative project of Anglicare Victoria, the Brotherhood of St Laurence and the Centre for Adolescent Health Royal Children's Hospital. /

by Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2006Description: 9p.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: September 2006 Progress report for the Frank and Flora Leith Trust. Progress report no. 2Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).
Items available for reference: BSL Archives (1).

A literature review of school practices to overcome school failure /

by Faubert, Brenton | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Publisher: 2012Description: PDF.Other title: OECD Economics Department. Working paper ; no. 68.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: January 2012 Bibliography : p. 27-30Summary: This working paper was prepared as part of the OECD thematic review Overcoming School Failure: Policies that Work, www.oecd.org/edu/equity. The project provides evidence on the policies that are effective to reduce school failure by improving low attainment and reducing dropout, and proactively supports countries in promoting reform. The project builds on the conceptual framework developed in the OECD?s No More Failures: Ten Steps to Equity in Education (2007). Austria, Canada (Manitoba, Ontario, Qu bec and Yukon), Czech Republic, France, Greece, Ireland, Netherlands, Spain and Sweden took part in this project. This working paper is part of a series of papers prepared for the thematic review Overcoming School Failure: Policies that Work covering the topics of policies to reduce dropout and in-school practices to reduce school failure. These report have been used as background material for the final comparative report Equity and Quality in Education: Supporting Disadvantaged Schools and Students (OECD, 2012), which gives evidence on the policy levers that can help overcome school failure and reduce inequities in OECD education systems. It focuses on the reasons why investing in overcoming school failure -early and up to upper secondary- pays off, on alternatives to specific system level policies that are currently hindering equity, and on the actions to be taken at school level, in particular in low performing disadvantaged schools.Availability: (1)

A social inclusion action plan : opportunities and challenges : discussion paper /

by Swinburne University of Technology.

Publisher: Hawthorn, Vic. Swinburne University of Technology 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: August 2010 Bibliography : p. 28 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This discussion paper outlines the challenges and opportunities for Swinburne University of Technology in responding to the emerging social inclusion policy agenda in Australia. One of the significant policy agendas of both the State and Federal governments is Social Inclusion. As a result of the Bradley Review of Higher Education, all Universities will be allocated targets to increase their enrolments of students from a low Socio-economic background. It will be critical for Swinburne to have a clear understanding how we will engage with such groups and build educational opportunities. As a dual-sector University, Swinburne is ideally placed to address these issues, having the capability of providing pathways for a very broad range of students and to ensure they are adequately prepared to succeed.Availability: (1)

Adolescent overload? : report of the inquiry into combining school and work : supporting successful youth transitions /

by Australia. House of Representatives Standing Committee on ducation and Training.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 2009 Chair: Ms Sharon Bird, MP. Includes bibliographical references.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Against the odds : influences on the post-school success of 'low performers' /

by Thomson, Sue | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Hiliman, Kylie.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2010Description: 36 p. : ill., graphs, tables.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography : pp. 32 Appendices : pp. 33-36 INTO AND OUT OF WORK SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: The link between academic achievement and labour market outcomes is well established. But how well does a student's achievement in a test predict their later success in life? This study examines this question, with 'success' considered to encompass satisfaction with life together with the extent to which young people are fully occupied with education, employment or a combination of these. Low performers in mathematics in the 2003 Programme for International Student Assessment were the focus. The study found that 'low performing' status has little impact on future success. Further, students who saw the value of mathematics for their future success were more likely to achieve this success.Availability: (1)

Are young people's educational outcomes linked to their sense of control? /

by Baron, Juan D | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied conomic and Social Research | Cobb-Clark, Deborah.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Melbourne Institute working paper ; no. 5/10.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: May 2010 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This paper analyzes the link between young people's sense (locus) of control over their lives and their investments in education. We find that young people with a more internal locus of control have a higher probability of finishing secondary school and, conditional on completion, meeting the requirements to obtain a university entrance rank. Moreover, those with an internal locus of control who obtain a university entrance rank achieve somewhat higher rankings than do their peers who have a more external locus of control. Not surprisingly, there is a negative relationship between growing up in disadvantage and educational outcomes. However, this effect does not appear to operate indirectly by increasing the likelihood of having a more external locus of control. In particular, we find no significant relationship between family welfare history and young people's locus of control.Availability: (1)

Attitudes, intentions and participation in education : year 12 and beyond /

by Australian Council for Educational Research.

Publisher: Camberwell, Vic. Australian Council for Educational Research 2010Description: PDF.Other title: Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Briefing ; no. 20.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: This briefing paper draws on findings from several LSAY Research Reports which report on how student attitudes and engagement in the formative school years influence subsequent participation in post-compulsory education and training. Data is used from two LSAY cohorts: students who were in Year 9 in 1995, and students who were in Year 9 in 1998. Attitudes to school in the LSAY program are based on student responses to a set of 30 items, and intentions to further study are recorded in Year 9. This paper, published by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER), is part of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) research program.Availability: (1)

Benchmarks and growth and success : oh, my! /

by Kingsbury, G. Gage.

Publisher: Camberwell, Vic. Australian Council for Educational Research 2005Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Building engagement, building futures : our strategy to maximise the participation of 16-24 year olds in education, training and work /

by Great Britain. Department for Education.

Publisher: London, U.K. HM Government 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: December 2011 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Increasing the participation of 16-24 year olds in learning and employment not only makes a lasting difference to their individual lives, but is central to our ambitions to improve social mobility and stimulate economic growth. Building Engagement, Building Futures sets out how our radical reforms to schools, vocational education, skills and welfare provision will all make a significant difference to young people's opportunities and support. The British Government recognises that in some areas we need to go further, in particular to help the most vulnerable young people at risk of long-term disengagement.Availability: (1)

Building learning communities with character : how to integrate academic, social, and emotional learning /

by Novick, Bernard | Kress, Jeffrey S | Elias, Maurice J.

Publisher: Alexandria, Virginia Association for Supervision & Curriculum Development 2002Description: ix, 137 p.Summary: Social and emotional learning and character education are complementary approaches to strengthening a person's ability to understand, manage, and express the social and emotional aspects of life and to organize action in a positive, goal-directed manner. For children, social-emotional learning and character education underpin their ability to successfully manage the tasks of everyday life such as learning, forming relationships, solving everyday problems, and adapting to the complex demands of growth and development. We feel these approaches greatly help school administrators improve the quality of student and staff learning and the climate of their schools. ; This book is designed for administrators at any level of experience with social-emotional and character education programs. It is intended for people with little or no prior background in these programs or related areas; for people with some knowledge, but need help in introducing the programs to their school; and for people who may have begun the implementation process, but want additional ideas to increase the chance of success. Interest in social-emotional learning and character education is growing, and many administrators have been exposed to ideas from a variety of sources. These include popular books (e.g., Daniel Goleman's Emotional Intelligence, 1995), magazine articles, and journals targeting administrators (Elias, Zins, Weissberg, & Associates, 1997;Educational Leadership Special Issue, May, 1997),and media-based staff development tools (National Center for Innovation and Education, 1999). Appendix A provides a basic overview of social-emotional learning.[Preface-Extract]Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Building relationships for better outcomes : Peninsula Youth Connections evaluation stage 2 : research summary

by Barrett, Anna | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2012Description: 4 p. : ill.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The second stage of the evaluation of Peninsula Youth Connections, operated by the Brotherhood of St Laurence and TaskForce, focused on young people's experiences of the service and their outcomes. The young people emphasised the importance of the friendly, respectful and supportive interactions and the flexibility of the program. The great majority successfully re-engaged with education and training, showing the value of this case management model.Availability: (1)

Building relationships for better outcomes : Peninsula Youth Connections evaluation stage 2 report

by Barrett, Anna | Brotherhood of St Laurence.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. Brotherhood of St Laurence 2012Description: x, 57 p. : ill.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Notes: This report represents Stage 2 of a three-stage evaluation. Full report and Research summary PDF is of full report Bibliography : p. 57Summary: The second stage of the evaluation of Peninsula Youth Connections, operated by the Brotherhood of St Laurence and TaskForce, focused on young people's experiences of the service and their outcomes. The young people emphasised the importance of the friendly, respectful and supportive interactions and the flexibility of the program. The great majority successfully re-engaged with education and training, showing the value of this case management model.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Care-system impacts on academic outcomes : research report /

by Wise, Sarah | Anglicare Victoria. Social Policy and Research Unit | Pollock, Sarah | Mitchell, Gaye | Argus, Cathy | Farquhar, Peta.

Publisher: Collingwood ; Melbourne Anglicare Victoria and Wesley Mission Victoria 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: June 2010 Bibliography : p. 58-61 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: Children in out-of-home care are changing schools often, repeating grades, dropping out early and suffering higher rates of mental and physical health conditions which limit their participation at school. Despite the importance of a quality education, children and youth who live away from the families of their birth parents are known to experience poor education outcomes compared to children and young people in the community generally. Although Australian research is somewhat limited, the findings are unequivocal; children in out-of-home care perform academically below what is normal for their age, are at risk of disengaging or are disengaged from school and often don t achieve any academic qualification.Availability: (1)

Centre for Independent Studies submission to the NSW Community Discussion Paper: Improving educational outcomes for Aboriginal people /

by Hughes, Helen | Centre for Independent Studies (Australia) | Hughes, Mark.

Publisher: St Leonards, N.S.W. Centre for Independent Studies 2012Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: 29 March 2012Summary: Submits summary of research findings to support recommendation to give principals more autonomy to opt out of Indigenous specific programs and instead (focussing on problem, or failing schools) receive equivalent funds for additional teachers and programs that principals and their teachers believe will deliver results.Availability: (1)

Childhood economic resources, academic performance, and the choice to leave school at age sixteen. /

by Maani, Sholeh A | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research | Kalb, Guyonne.

Publisher: [Parkville, Vic.] Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research 2003Description: 28 p.Online Access: Electronic copy Availability: (1)

Cultural Chameleons : an investigation into the construction and influences of working-class identities on the formal learning of white, baby-boomer males /

by Lovett, Trevor | The Australian Sociological Association.

Publisher: unpub. 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Conference paper presented at The Australian Sociological Association (TASA) Conference. Social Causes, Private Lives (2010 : North Ryde, N.S.W.) Bibliography : p. 9-11Summary: This paper outlines the findings of a qualitative, narrative, retrospective investigation into white, working-class, baby-boomer males? perceptions of their own formal educational experiences. The study while accepting the significance of the socio-economic/class correlation also identified important non-material influences of class on the participants? formal learning. The investigation revealed how discursively marginalized social identities negotiated their relationship with formal learning environments. Social persistence or continuity was considered problematic because many effects normally associated with a stratified social structure were not obvious in the research data. The study showed that the participants' educational potential was affected more by the dynamics of personal interaction than broad socially constructed differences. It was found that the educational and social opportunities of the participant sample tended to be a consequence of the respect individual actors showed for each other both within and outside the context of the school.Availability: (1)

Does combining school and work affect school and post-school outcomes? /

by Anlezark, Alison | National Centre for Vocational Education Research | Lim, Patrick.

Publisher: Adelaide, S.A. National Centre for Vocational Education Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Bibliography p. 29 Appendices pp. 30-52 SCHOOL TO WORKSummary: In this report the authors seek to answer the question of whether combining school and work is detrimental or beneficial to a student's school educational performance and labour market outcomes. They find that young people who combine school and work are distributed right across the school population. Results show that individuals can combine school and work with minimal impact on their study if the hours are modest and those working longer hours show a stronger orientation towards work than study. The authors used data from the 2003 cohort (Y03) of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth.Availability: (1)

Does it pay for Indigenous youth to go to school? : variation in the predicted economic benefits of high school. /

by Biddle, Nicholas.

Publisher: 2006Notes: SCHOOL TO WORKAvailability: No items available

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