Brotherhood of St Laurence

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Renewable energy development and the Native Title Act 1993 (Cwlth) : the fairness of validating future acts associated with renewable energy projects / Ganur Maynard ; Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research

by Maynard, Ganur | Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research.

Canberra, ACT : Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research (ANU), 2022Description: v, 31 p. : ill. (Online Resource).Online Access: Website Summary: Increasing demand, innovations in technology, and extensions to electricity grid infrastructure are likely to lead to a growth in renewable energy development on native title land and water. The likelihood that native title holders and claimants will benefit from this development will depend in part upon the legal regime that governs native title. The prevailing legal regime governing renewable energy development on native title land and water involves two principal alternatives to permitting development: voluntary land use agreements and compulsory government acquisition of native title. While the procedures associated with these alternatives afford native title holders and claimants more procedural protection than some commentators have suggested, they fail to attain the standard of ‘free, prior, and informed consent’ prescribed by international best practice and the philosophical and moral arguments that underpin that standard. To remedy this failure, the Native Title Act 1993 (Cwlth) should be amended to place less weight on economic and similar considerations when authorising the compulsory acquisition of native title for renewable energy development, or prohibit the compulsory acquisition of native title generally, except for in certain exceptional circumstances. While this paper focuses on renewable energy in particular, a number of its conclusions could apply to issues that attenuate native title generally. . [Abstract] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Submission regarding 'minimum energy efficiency standards for rental homes in the ACT' consultation paper / BSL

by Brotherhood of St Laurence | Sullivan, Damian.

Publisher: Fitzroy, Vic. : Brotherhood of St Laurence, 2021Description: 4 p. PDF.Other title: Submission re Minimum energy efficiency standards for rental homes in the ACT | [Submission to] Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development Directorate ACT Government.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: The BSL strongly supports minimum energy efficiency standards for rented homes, which we see as a vital policy that will lower cost of living and improve health and comfort for renters, particularly the people facing disadvantage who we work with. Standards are particularly effective at improving the quality of the poorest quality homes, which are often rented by people on low incomes. People in these poor quality homes are too often in an unenviable position – high rent and low income give them limited choice in the market, if they end up in a poor quality home (as they often do) they face higher electricity bills or poor health and wellbeing outcomes. Minimum standards can go some way to addressing this issue. Standards will also contribute to Australia’s climate change response and improve air pollution. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Net zero momentum tracker : energy sector / (ClimateWorks Australia) (Monash Sustainable Development Institute)

by ClimateWorks Australia | Monash University. Monash Sustainable Development Institute.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. ClimateWorks Australia 2021Description: 50 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: This report analyses the 20 highest emitting electricity generators and energy (electricity and gas) retailers in Australia. These companies account for almost one-third of the country’s total emissions. This assessment considers specific requirements and opportunities associated with the critical role the energy sector plays in enabling decarbonisation across all sectors of Australia’s economy. It focuses on Australia’s electricity generators and significant ‘gen-tailers’ – companies that both generate electricity and retail energy to consumers. Collectively, the 20 companies assessed are responsible for 71 per cent of total national electricity generation and account for 89 per cent of Australia’s electricity sector scope 1 and 2 emissions. For these companies, fossil fuels purchased or burnt for the power they generate are a material source of emissions (scope 1 and 2). Where companies also retail gas, we have included this as part of our analysis, as gas retail can be a significant source of indirect (scope 3) emissions when gas is used by their customers. Each company’s decarbonisation commitments have been assessed against ClimateWorks’ Decarbonisation Futures scenarios (ClimateWorks 2020). These scenarios map least-cost sector decarbonisation trajectories for Australia. This modelling indicates that for scenarios in line with Australia’s share in limiting global emissions, the electricity sector should achieve at least 64 per cent in emissions reductions by 2030 (from a 2017 base year), reach near zero emissions by 2040 and zero emissions by 2050. Overall, energy sector commitments are insufficient for Australia to achieve a Paris-aligned transition to net zero. [Summary] Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

The Brundtland City Energy Network /

by Brundtland City Energy Network.

Publisher: 11/21/2003 00:25:37http://brundtlandnet.esbensen.dk/ 2005Notes: Description based on contents viewed : 11/21/2003 00:25:37 Mode of access : WORLD WIDE WEB ONLINE RESOURCESummary: The Brundtland City Energy Network (BCEN) is an initiative to link cities and towns in Europe in addressing one issue: sustainable energy use. In Brundtland Cities there is a recognition that energy plays a pivotal role in both economic development and quality of life - but that both are seriously threatened this century by the environmental problems associated with current energy use patterns. There is also a recognition that it is not enough to tackle this issue at a global and national level - but that practical, workable solutions also require strong locally based action.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

International Energy Agency : energy security, growth and sustainability through co-operation and outreach. /

by International Energy Agency.

Publisher: 02/20/2007 11:52:46http://www.iea.org/ 2007Notes: Description based on contents viewed : 02/20/2007 11:52:46 Mode of access : WORLD WIDE WEB ONLINE RESOURCESummary: The International Energy Agency (IEA) acts as energy policy advisor to 26 member countries in their effort to ensure reliable, affordable and clean energy for their citizens. Founded during the oil crisis of 1973-74, the IEA s initial role was to co-ordinate measures in times of oil supply emergencies. As energy markets have changed, so has the IEA. Its mandate has broadened to incorporate the Three E s of balanced energy policy making: energy security, economic development and environmental protection. Current work focuses on climate change policies, market reform, energy technology collaboration and outreach to the rest of the world, especially major producers and consumers of energy like China, India, Russia and the OPEC countries.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

International Energy Agency : Agence Internationale de l'Energie /

by International Energy Agency.

Publisher: Paris, Francehttp://www.iea.org/ 2007Notes: Description based on contents viewed : 07/17/2007 15:31:21 Mode of access : WORLD WIDE WEB ONLINE RESOURCESummary: The International Energy Agency (IEA) acts as energy policy advisor to 26 Member countries in their effort to ensure reliable, affordable and clean energy for their citizens. Founded during the oil crisis of 1973-74, the IEA s initial role was to co-ordinate measures in times of oil supply emergencies. As energy markets have changed, so has the IEA. Its mandate has broadened to incorporate the Three E s of balanced energy policy making: energy security, economic development and environmental protection. Current work focuses on climate change policies, market reform, energy technology collaboration and outreach to the rest of the world, especially major producers and consumers of energy like China, India, Russia and the OPEC countries.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Clean Energy Council /

by Clean Energy Council.

Publisher: Southbank, Vic. Clean Energy Council 2009Notes: WebsiteSummary: The Clean Energy Council is an amalgamation of the Australian Wind Energy Industry Association (Auswind) and the Australian Business Council for Sustainable Energy (BCSE). With over 400 businesses covering a quarter of Australia's total electricity production including gas, wind, hydro and bioenergy; and in the spectrum of business in the low-emission energy and energy efficiency sectors. Including solar PV, solar hot water, biomass, geothermal and cogeneration. ; The clean energy sector is focused on tackling climate change in Australia. We maintain that as stationary energy is responsible for 50% of Australia's emissions - with electricity production by far the largest contributor. Any responsible remedy to climate change must tackle Australia's electricity mix.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

National Energy Policy - framework 2030 : strategic directions paper /

by Department of Resources, Energy & tourism.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Department of Resources, Energy & Tourism. 2009Description: PDF.Notes: URL: 'http://tinyurl.com/dxez2z' Checked: 2/06/2009 11:33:44 AM Status: Live Details: HTTP status 200 - Usual success responseSummary: This document sets the scene for the development of the Energy White Paper by broadly mapping out its intended scope and identifying some of the specific work being undertaken as input for consideration. The release of this document will be followed by the release of a series of detailed discussion papers in March and April 2009. The discussion papers will address international energy; realising Australia s energy resource potential; the legal, institutional and governance framework; competitive markets, structural reform and investment; maximising the value of technology in the energy sector; and our people, demographics, workforce and Indigenous participation.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Energy democracy : community-scale green energy solutions /

by Fazen, Amy McKnight | Center for Social Inclusion | James, Kimberly.

Publisher: New York, NY Center for Social Inclusion 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Summary: Energy Democracy is a policy framework with the goal of transforming neglected and isolated communities in the United States, often poor, and often communities of color into energy producers who contribute to the nation's overall capacity, add clean energy to the grid, enhance their economic and political ties across the region, and supply their own energy needs. Without intervention, communities of color risk missing a transformative opportunity for a meaningful role in America's changing energy economy.Availability: (1)

Green Start : program guidelines : round one /

by Australia. Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency.

Publisher: [Canberra, A.C.T.] Australia. Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2010Summary: The Australian Government is committed to developing programs and rebates to support householders, industry and the community to save energy and reduce emissions. The Green Start program will help households improve the energy efficiency of their homes by providing grants to individuals or organisations to undertake on-site home energy assessments of eligible residential homes. The program will also provide grants to individuals or organisations to assist low income and disadvantaged Australian households, including support for implementing projects or actions to reduce energy use.Availability: (1)

Australian sustainable energy : zero carbon Australia stationary energy plan /

by Wright, Matthew | University of Melbourne. Melbourne Energy Institute | Hearps, Patrick.

Publisher: Parkville, Vic. University of Melbourne. Melbourne Energy Institute 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: Zero Carbon Australia outlines a coherent and thoroughly researched blueprint showing how 100% renewable energy is achievable using technologies that are commercially available today: wind power and concentrating solar thermal with molten salt storage. It goes through the options, costs and benefits, confirming that a 10 year transformation of the stationary energy sector is achievable and affordable. This will also add huge stimulus to the new green economy and create jobs.Availability: (1)

Report of the Prime Minister's Task Group on Energy Efficiency /

by Australia. Department of Climate Change and Energy fficiency.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Australia. Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2010 Bibliography : p. 265-270 Chair: Martin ParkinsonSummary: The former Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd established a Task Group on Energy Efficiency to advise the Australian Government, by mid-2010, on options to improve Australia's energy efficiency by 2020. The Task Group's terms of reference were explicit in focusing on the need to deliver a step-change improvement in energy efficiency by 2020. In order to be at the forefront of OECD energy efficiency improvement Australia will need to take dramatic and sustained action.Availability: (1)

Clean Energy Australia 2010 /

by Clean Energy Council.

Publisher: Southbank, Vic. Clean Energy Council 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: INTO AND OUT OF WORKSummary: The Clean Energy Australia report provides a snapshot of the industry for 2010. It includes new modelling that predicts the creation of more than 55,000 clean energy jobs over the next decade, many of which will be in regional areas. It also includes data on the installation of household solar power.Availability: (1)

National strategy on energy efficiency /

by Council of Australian Governments.

Publisher: Canberra, A.C.T. Commonwealth of Australia 2009Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Updated July 2010Summary: The Strategy set out in this paper is designed to substantially improve minimum standards for energy efficiency and accelerate the introduction of new technologies through improving regulatory processes and addressing the barriers to the uptake of new energy-efficient products and technologies. The Strategy aims to encourage and support innovation in energy efficient technologies and approaches. It incorporates and builds on measures already agreed by COAG and the Ministerial Council on Energy through the National Framework on Energy Efficiency (NFEE).Availability: (1)

Green streets, strong communities : what communities can do for emissions reductions and what emissions reductions can do for communities /

by Platt, Reg | Cook, Will | Pendleton, Andrew.

Publisher: London, U.K. Institute for Public Policy Research 2011Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: July 2011 Includes bibliographical referencesSummary: This is an evaluation of the British Gas Green Streets community energy challenge in which 14 groups from dramatically different communities in England, Scotland and Wales were selected to spend a share of 2 million on a variety of microgeneration and energy efficiency measures in community buildings and surrounding households in pursuit of three objectives: to save energy, to generate energy, and to engage the wider community.Availability: (1)

Clean Energy Australia report 2020

by Clean Energy Council.

Publisher: Melbourne, Vic. Clean Energy Council 2020Description: 86 p. : ill. PDF.Online Access: DOWNLOAD PDF Summary: Another year of extraordinary growth saw records tumble in 2019 as state governments, industry and communities embraced the transition to clean energy. There were 34 large-scale projects completed in 2019, increasing Australia’s large-scale renewable energy capacity by 2.2 GW and generating $4.3 billion in investment and more than 4000 new jobs. Renewable energy was responsible for 24 per cent of Australia’s total electricity generation in 2019, an increase of 2.7 percentage points on 2018. For a brief period, renewables passed the 50 per cent mark of total generation in the National Electricity Market in November. While this was only fleeting, it will be an increasingly common occurrence as renewable energy penetration increases in the coming years. Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Making the switch : Australian clean energy policies /

by The Climate Institute.

Publisher: The Climate Institute 2007Description: PDF.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

Renewable energy investment opportunities and abatement in Australia /

by Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

Publisher: Sydney, N.S.W. Bloomberg New Energy Finance 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: Commissioned by The Climate Institute and Westpac May 2010Availability: (1)

Subsidizing energy efficient household capital : how does it compare to a carbon tax? /

by McKibbin, Warwick J | Brookings Institution | Morris, Adele C | Wilcoxen, Peter J.

Publisher: Washington, DC Brookings Institution 2010Description: PDF.Online Access: Electronic copy Notes: October 13, 2010Summary: Proponents of ambitious climate policy often support imposing both a price on carbon and 'complementary policies' to provide incentives for the deployment of energy-efficient and low carbon technologies. Current U.S. law offers an extensive variety of tax benefits for certain kinds of energy production and conservation, including incentives for renewable electricity production, energy efficient household investments, and bio-fuel production. The U.S. Congress expressed its continued enthusiasm for these measures in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act), which extended many consumer energy-related tax incentives as part of the fiscal stimulus package. In particular, the Recovery Act expanded two energy-related tax credits for households: the non-business energy property credit and the residential energy efficient property credit. The non-business energy property credit equals 30 percent of homeowner expenditure on eligible investments, up to a maximum tax credit of Availability: (1)

World Energy Outlook 2021 / International Energy Agency (IEA)

by International Energy Agency (IEA).

Publisher: [Paris] : IEA Publications, 2021Description: 1 online resource (383 pages) : illustrations.Online Access: Website Summary: Against the backdrop of turbulent markets and a crucial meeting of the COP26 conference on climate change in Glasgow, the 2021 World Energy Outlook (WEO) provides an indispensable guide to the opportunities, benefits and risks ahead at this vital moment for clean energy transitions. The WEO is the energy world’s most authoritative source of analysis and projections. This flagship publication of the IEA has appeared every year since 1998. Its objective data and dispassionate analysis provide critical insights into global energy supply and demand in different scenarios and the implications for energy security, climate targets and economic development. In 2020, even while economies bent under the weight of Covid-19 lockdowns, renewable sources of energy such as wind and solar PV continued to grow rapidly, and electric vehicles set new sales records. The new energy economy will be more electrified, efficient, interconnected and clean. Its emergence is the product of a virtuous circle of policy action and technology innovation, and its momentum is now sustained by lower costs. In most markets, solar PV or wind now represents the cheapest available source of new electricity generation. Clean energy technology is becoming a major new area for investment and employment – and a dynamic arena for international collaboration and competition. The World Energy Outlook 2021 (WEO-2021) is a special edition. It is designed to inform the energy and climate debates at the UNFCCC Conference of the Parties (COP26) in November 2021 and beyond. As such, it departs from the usual WEO structure in the way it organises and presents the material and analyses. The WEO-2021 chapters:  Chapter 1 provides an overview of key themes, drawing on material from the other chapters and augmented with additional analysis.  Chapter 2 presents the latest energy data to set the scene and describes the scenarios used in this year’s analysis, the assumptions that underpin them, and how and why they differ from each other.  Chapter 3 focuses on the gap between the announced pledges, made by governments in the run-up to COP26, and the goal to limit the rise of the global average temperature to 1.5 °C, and examines in detail how this gap can be closed.  Chapter 4 examines what it will take to implement the announced pledges, and looks broadly at the projections for energy demand and electricity across all of our scenarios.  Chapter 5 continues the multi-scenario approach and explores the outlook for various fuels.  Chapter 6 presents a cross-cutting thematic discussion of the various energy security hazards that could arise during energy transitions, both in domestic energy systems and internationally.Availability: Items available for loan: Brotherhood of St Laurence (1).

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